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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The style of fence is called "Barcelona," but some residents of Tuscany-Canterbury say it reminds them more of Berlin. It's the "Gorbachev fence" to the mother of neighbor Fred Chalfant, who often walks his dog past the barrier, which is six-feet tall, topped with spikes and divides West 39th Street down the middle. Last week, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke called it “a Berlin Wall of a fence,” as she demanded justification for the fence's appearance, in a letter to the city's Department of Transportation, which erected the fence in mid-April.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Louise Mullan Flanigan, who owned and operated the Ambassador Gift Shop for six decades in a landmark Tuscany-Canterbury apartment house her father built, died Saturday in her sleep of undetermined causes at Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 101 and had lived in Guilford. Born Clementine Louise Mullan in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas F. Mullan, a builder, and his wife, Clementine L. Mullen, a homemaker. Her father was an original owner of the Baltimore Colts and was later treasurer of the Baltimore Orioles, beginning in the 1954 season.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 18, 2013
Seventeen people and one dog gathered in Wyman Park on Sunday for a two-hour tour of tracks, tunnels, charcoal burns and other evidence of the old Maryland and Pennsylvania railroad line, better known as the Ma and Pa, which ran 77.2 miles between Baltimore and York, Pa., from 1901 to 1954. "I've always been curious about that railroad," said Eric Jack, 60, of Hampden. "I didn't even know it came down here," said Deletta Scopel, also 60 and of Hampden, who came with her friend, Theo Pinette, 63, of Stone Hill.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 18, 2013
Seventeen people and one dog gathered in Wyman Park on Sunday for a two-hour tour of tracks, tunnels, charcoal burns and other evidence of the old Maryland and Pennsylvania railroad line, better known as the Ma and Pa, which ran 77.2 miles between Baltimore and York, Pa., from 1901 to 1954. "I've always been curious about that railroad," said Eric Jack, 60, of Hampden. "I didn't even know it came down here," said Deletta Scopel, also 60 and of Hampden, who came with her friend, Theo Pinette, 63, of Stone Hill.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Carl S. Hyman, an executive of a firm that tests students and assesses their achievement both in the U.S. and overseas who was also a Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood activist, died of lung cancer Sept. 5 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 57. Born in Baltimore and raised on Taney Road in Cheswolde, he was a 1973 Polytechnic Institute graduate. His father, David Hyman, was an architect, civil engineer and Johns Hopkins University professor who specialized in Mesoamerican archaeology.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
John Elsen III, a mechanical engineer who owned a roofing business, died Nov. 15 of injuries from a fall off a roof in North Baltimore. He was 62 and lived in Overlea. Born in Chicago and raised in Evanston, Ill., he earned a degree in mechanical engineering from Minnesota State University. Mr. Elsen moved to Baltimore more than 20 years ago and founded C. Joy Roofers, a business named for his daughter. He had many customers in North Baltimore. "He became a fixture in this neighborhood," said Andrew J. O'Brien, who lives in the Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
There are some widely shared opinions about the Ambassador Dining Room, the Indian restaurant that has operated on the ground level of the Ambassador apartment building since 1997. The first of them, which is nearly unanimous, is that the terrace is a knockout. Set at the back of the main dining room, it overlooks the lush and fragrant gardens behind the apartment building in Baltimore's Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood. It's good to be back here, under cover, sitting on a wide comfortable chair at your formally set table.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Doris C. Simpson, an avid gardener and birder who had been a garden club president, died Tuesday from cerebrovascular disease at the Cathedral Village retirement community in Philadelphia. She was 94. The former Doris McElroy Cullings was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., and after the death of her parents, she and her sister were raised by their paternal grandmother. In 1940, she earned a bachelor's degree in music from Rhodes College in Memphis, and the next year, married her college sweetheart, Dr. Thomas W. Simpson.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Joan C. Moag, a family matriarch who started a successful home wallpapering business on a whim, died of complications of cancer and Alzheimer's disease Monday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 78 and had lived in Tuscany-Canterbury. Born Joan Swanson in Chicago, she attended Aquinas High School and Loyola University of Chicago. She married John Andrew Moag, a neighbor who lived on the same block, in 1953. They spent their honeymoon in Paris and lived for a year in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was stationed with the Army.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Marianna Inga Burt, an attorney who represented children, died of cardiovascular disease March 12 at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 80 and lived in the Tuscany-Canterbury section of North Baltimore. Born Marianna Koenig in Hoganas, Sweden, she was the daughter of a chemist, Walter Koenig, and his wife, Elisabeth. She and her family moved to Germany in 1944 and lived in Stendal. She graduated from high school in what became East Germany during the Soviet occupation. Her family eventually left East Germany and relocated to West Germany.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 18, 2013
Attorney Robert Erwin pruned ivy on a tree outside his house Sunday afternoon as cars rolled through Baltimore City's new roundabout at 39th Street and Canterbury Road. So, he was asked, is the traffic-calming device a good thing or a bad thing? “It's a bad thing,” Erwin declared. “It doesn't seem to be slowing down traffic, especially early in the morning during rush hour. And B, I think it's ugly.” But four days earlier, as a month of construction work wound down on the controversial traffic circle, 25 residents came together at the finished site July 10 for a group photo that also served as a show of solidarity and support, at least until the novelty wears off. “We're trying to be positive about it,” said Kenna Forsyth, a 37-year resident.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Doris C. Simpson, an avid gardener and birder who had been a garden club president, died Tuesday from cerebrovascular disease at the Cathedral Village retirement community in Philadelphia. She was 94. The former Doris McElroy Cullings was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., and after the death of her parents, she and her sister were raised by their paternal grandmother. In 1940, she earned a bachelor's degree in music from Rhodes College in Memphis, and the next year, married her college sweetheart, Dr. Thomas W. Simpson.
FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
There are some widely shared opinions about the Ambassador Dining Room, the Indian restaurant that has operated on the ground level of the Ambassador apartment building since 1997. The first of them, which is nearly unanimous, is that the terrace is a knockout. Set at the back of the main dining room, it overlooks the lush and fragrant gardens behind the apartment building in Baltimore's Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood. It's good to be back here, under cover, sitting on a wide comfortable chair at your formally set table.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 11, 2013
Construction of a mini-traffic circle began Monday at 39th Street and Canterbury Road in Tuscany-Canterbury, and is already affecting one local restaurant in a roundabout way. Dino Zeytinoglu, owner of La Famiglia, an Italian restaurant in the Broadview Apartments near the circle site, said he had a party of 106 people coming for dinner Monday night and was worried that they would have difficulty getting to the restaurant, especially on a rainy...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Marianna Inga Burt, an attorney who represented children, died of cardiovascular disease March 12 at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 80 and lived in the Tuscany-Canterbury section of North Baltimore. Born Marianna Koenig in Hoganas, Sweden, she was the daughter of a chemist, Walter Koenig, and his wife, Elisabeth. She and her family moved to Germany in 1944 and lived in Stendal. She graduated from high school in what became East Germany during the Soviet occupation. Her family eventually left East Germany and relocated to West Germany.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Carl S. Hyman, an executive of a firm that tests students and assesses their achievement both in the U.S. and overseas who was also a Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood activist, died of lung cancer Sept. 5 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 57. Born in Baltimore and raised on Taney Road in Cheswolde, he was a 1973 Polytechnic Institute graduate. His father, David Hyman, was an architect, civil engineer and Johns Hopkins University professor who specialized in Mesoamerican archaeology.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Louise Mullan Flanigan, who owned and operated the Ambassador Gift Shop for six decades in a landmark Tuscany-Canterbury apartment house her father built, died Saturday in her sleep of undetermined causes at Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 101 and had lived in Guilford. Born Clementine Louise Mullan in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas F. Mullan, a builder, and his wife, Clementine L. Mullen, a homemaker. Her father was an original owner of the Baltimore Colts and was later treasurer of the Baltimore Orioles, beginning in the 1954 season.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 1, 2013
About a dozen Tuscany-Canterbury residents, including their city councilwoman, gathered Wednesday for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the neighborhood's new traffic circle, which they hope will make the intersection of 39th Street and Canterbury safer. "It's kind of a non-threatening place, but it's busy," said 14th District Councilwoman and longtime resident Mary Pat Clarke. Clarke was relieved when the circle, a hotly debated traffic-calming device, opened last month. "This is the first time since I moved here in 1967 that I pull into this intersection from Canterbury (Road)
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The style of fence is called "Barcelona," but some residents of Tuscany-Canterbury say it reminds them more of Berlin. It's the "Gorbachev fence" to the mother of neighbor Fred Chalfant, who often walks his dog past the barrier, which is six-feet tall, topped with spikes and divides West 39th Street down the middle. Last week, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke called it “a Berlin Wall of a fence,” as she demanded justification for the fence's appearance, in a letter to the city's Department of Transportation, which erected the fence in mid-April.
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