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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
The last 10 years have been very good for wine.Most of the world's great wine regions improved the quality of their product. California gained sophistication. Bordeaux gained consistency. The Rhine and the Mosel began to find a market. Even Burgundy, at long last, rose above fraud and incompetence and took advantage of some overdue good luck.But even these triumphs pale beside the tale of Tuscany, the north-central Italian region that once was known mainly for its industrial-strength Chianti.
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By Julekha Dash | March 31, 2014
Step into the Secolari shop at The Mall in Columbia, and you'll feel as though you're in a Tuscan farmhouse rather than a suburban shopping center. The walls are lined with stainless-steel containers, called fusti, filled with 20 different olive oils and 14 types of vinegar and aged balsamic. There's bread for sampling, along with other gourmet items proffered on rustic wooden tables designed by the store owners and made by a local lumber company. Champagne mimosa vinegar, basil-flavored olive oil, pear ginger wasabi balsamic, blackberry with roasted pepper vinegar and blood orange olive oil are some of Secolari's most unusual and popular flavors.
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FEATURES
By William Rice and William Rice,Chicago Tribune | December 9, 1992
Go ahead, tell the author of "Giuliano Bugialli's Foods of Tuscany" (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $50) that there's nothing new in his book.He'll only smile.The large, weighty, color-photo-filled, coffee-table volume is, he says, about "the Tuscany that was, that I'd like to see back."The man who speaks during a brief visit to Chicago is one of America's leading cooking teachers as well as author of four other cookery books, including "Giuliano Bugialli's Foods of Italy." He has spent part of each year in Florence for nearly two decades, teaching cooking classes and writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
I think of Bottega, Adrien Aeschilman's small and crazily charming new restaurant in Charles North, as the kind of place you'd want your best friend to open, if your friend was as talented and gracious as Aeschilman. Bottega might make you think of Philadelphia, where there was an explosion about 10 years ago of tiny mom-and-pop BYOB restaurants, many of them about the postage-stamp size of Bottega, which seats around 20 people, tops. The boutique BYOB trend never really caught on in Baltimore, but with Bottega, you can see how a city full of diners fell in love with it. First of all, Bottega is a great-looking place, full of rusticity, like the rough-hewn tables, farmhouse chic tableware and the parti-colored wooden floor planks that Aeschilman salvaged from a West Virginia barn.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Tuscany-Canterbury, a North Baltimore neighborhood known for its architectural diversity, has been named to the National Register of Historic Places. Much of the credit for the designation goes to Eileen Higham, a psychologist who began to write a book-length history of the community -- the world outside her Tudor-style window -- five years ago. Her research led to the application for historical status. Higham, who has lived with her husband in the neighborhood since 1970, fits the informal profile of the 3,000 residents of this triangular enclave north of the Johns Hopkins University campus, bounded by University Parkway, Charles Street and Linkwood Road: bookish, academic or professional and settled.
BUSINESS
By David Novich and David Novich,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 21, 1998
At the corner of Tuscany and Canterbury roads -- among the high-rise apartments and redbrick townhouses -- stands an Elizabethan half-timber and a modern Tudor-influenced structure. What they represent is an anomaly in this changing city community.Go to the former on a weekend night, and you'll see Johns Hopkins University students dimming the party lights of the three-story fraternity house at 3906 Canterbury, with the sounds of alternative bands permeating the streets.Go to the latter on a weekday afternoon, and you'll experience a two-block line of double-parked station wagons and minivans lined up in front of the Calvert School on Tuscany, with anxious mothers honking and children playing on the curb.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Is anyone in Anne Arundel County -- or anywhere -- missing a goat? A female in very poor condition that's being called Tuscany was found wandering near Linthicum on Thursday and county officials are trying to find out who she belongs to and how she got there. Animal Control responded to a call on Friday after an 11-year-old found Tuscany on River Road in northern Linthicum. The goat had a chain weighing more than 23 pounds hanging from her neck. Though the chain wasn't tight, it was so heavy that it had become embedded in the goat's neck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Calvin Trillin | May 4, 2003
"May is a perfect time to be in Tuscany -- a time when it's still not too hot for a contessa to spend some time next to the pool, gazing approvingly over the vineyards that surround her."
FEATURES
August 23, 2008
Debbie Reichlin had had her fill with the quarter-acre suburban lot, but she wasn't done with gardening. When she and her husband, Doug, moved into Tuscany-Canterbury a few years ago, she found she could plant her flowers and have time to enjoy them, too. See what she did in her small city garden at baltimoresun.com/gardener.
NEWS
May 11, 2006
On May 8, 2006 JAMES MCHENRY GILLET (MAC) survived by many loving cousins. A Graveside service will be held at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Owings Mills on Thursday, May 11 at 2 P.M. Memorial service will follow in the church at 2:30. In lieu of flowers contributions to The Calvert School, 105 Tuscany Road, Baltimore, MD 21210 or St. Andrew's School, 350 Noxontown Road, Middletown, DE 19709. Arrangements by the family owned Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 18, 2013
Attorney Robert Erwin pruned ivy on a tree outside his house Sunday afternoon as cars rolled through Baltimore City's new roundabout at 39th Street and Canterbury Road. So, he was asked, is the traffic-calming device a good thing or a bad thing? “It's a bad thing,” Erwin declared. “It doesn't seem to be slowing down traffic, especially early in the morning during rush hour. And B, I think it's ugly.” But four days earlier, as a month of construction work wound down on the controversial traffic circle, 25 residents came together at the finished site July 10 for a group photo that also served as a show of solidarity and support, at least until the novelty wears off. “We're trying to be positive about it,” said Kenna Forsyth, a 37-year resident.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 11, 2013
Construction of a mini-traffic circle began Monday at 39th Street and Canterbury Road in Tuscany-Canterbury, and is already affecting one local restaurant in a roundabout way. Dino Zeytinoglu, owner of La Famiglia, an Italian restaurant in the Broadview Apartments near the circle site, said he had a party of 106 people coming for dinner Monday night and was worried that they would have difficulty getting to the restaurant, especially on a rainy...
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The style of fence is called "Barcelona," but some residents of Tuscany-Canterbury say it reminds them more of Berlin. It's the "Gorbachev fence" to the mother of neighbor Fred Chalfant, who often walks his dog past the barrier, which is six-feet tall, topped with spikes and divides West 39th Street down the middle. Last week, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke called it “a Berlin Wall of a fence,” as she demanded justification for the fence's appearance, in a letter to the city's Department of Transportation, which erected the fence in mid-April.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Department of Transportation has a message for the residents of Tuscany-Canterbury: Do not walk on our grass. But instead of little signs, the transportation department conveys that message with a six-foot, spike-topped fence. The barrier runs down the middle of the newly seeded median it is protecting. "They say it's to protect the grass, but a light layer of hay would have remedied that," said Sandra Snow, who lives and works in the neighborhood. "A nice path, a walkway, a low hedge - there are so many things that could have been done.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Is anyone in Anne Arundel County -- or anywhere -- missing a goat? A female in very poor condition that's being called Tuscany was found wandering near Linthicum on Thursday and county officials are trying to find out who she belongs to and how she got there. Animal Control responded to a call on Friday after an 11-year-old found Tuscany on River Road in northern Linthicum. The goat had a chain weighing more than 23 pounds hanging from her neck. Though the chain wasn't tight, it was so heavy that it had become embedded in the goat's neck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
John Houser III enjoyed his meal at Cafe Tuscany (formerly A Little Bit of Tuscany) more than he thought he would. He reports in his review that Cafe Tuscany was worth the one-hour drive. But, of course, Cafe Tuscany is in a lot of our readers' neck of the woods. Here's John on the shrimp picatta: "This recipe was run into the ground during the 1990s and became a culinary pariah. Here it is un-ironic and delicious, showing why it became popular in the first place. " I love that feeling of "OH, that's what this is supposed to be!
NEWS
April 21, 2006
Jocelyn Fenwick Jones, a homemaker and former hospital administrator, died of renal and heart failure Tuesday at Georgetown University Hospital. She was 46. She was born in Baltimore and raised on Cloverhill Road in Tuscany-Canterbury. She attended the Calvert School and was a 1977 graduate of St. Timothy's School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from Georgetown University, where she also was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned a master's in business from George Washington University in 1984.
BUSINESS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Contributing Writer | May 22, 1994
The high-rise apartments standing in a tight semi-circle around Tuscany-Canterbury have the unintended effect of insulating this small, city community.Sounds of howling sirens and complaining car horns on nearby North Charles Street come muffled over the apartment penthouses and float down, as if wrapped in feathers, upon Tuscany-Canterbury's rowhouses and Tudor-style homes.The community also seems to lack the city's speed; short, winding and narrow streets see to that, requiring drivers to crawl rather than race from place to place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Forty-five minutes into the one-hour drive from Baltimore to Cafe Tuscany in Westminster , I'm cursing my editor. With all of the restaurants in Baltimore, why is it necessary to go this far out for Italian food? "This place better be worth it," I said jokingly to my companion as we pulled up in front of the storefront-like facade on Main Street. Later, while walking out the front entrance, I wanted to call my editor and thank him for sending me out for a great dinner. Opened in 2008, Cafe Tuscany (formerly A Little Bit of Tuscany)
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