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NEWS
January 29, 2006
For an animal revered as an emblem, Maryland's diamondback terrapin isn't getting much respect. Once abundant in the Chesapeake Bay's brackish waters, the turtle was devastated by overharvesting a century ago and has suffered a dramatic loss of habitat, particularly nesting beaches, since then. How many diamondbacks are left in a state that touts the species as the official state reptile and University of Maryland mascot? Nobody knows for sure. This much is clear: Demand for the turtles is escalating, particularly among Asian gourmets here and elsewhere around the country, and Maryland has done little to protect the species from being wiped out. Marguerite M. Whilden, a former Maryland Department of Natural Resources employee who now runs the nonprofit Terrapin Institute, purchased and released into the wild 3,000 terrapin from Maryland seafood dealers last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
In America, the land of strongly held opinions, a whiff of controversy about the proper way to celebrate Independence Day seems positively patriotic. So it was in Bel Air. Complaints of animal cruelty didn't stop the frog-hopping contest or turtle race at Shamrock Park on Friday morning, though organizers said that the number of contestants - 144 frogs and 105 turtles - was down from last year. A (comparatively) speedy turtle named Squirt won a trophy on behalf of 14-year-old Jessica Douglass of Whiteford, who has been coming to the derby for as long as she can remember.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, Baltimore Sun Media Group | July 2, 2013
Turtle derbies are almost as old as the republic, and still a staple in Maryland, a state that loves its terrapins. But conservationists and wildlife biologists say it's time to end this tradition, for the sake of the animals supposedly being celebrated. Warning of the risk of spreading diseases to both wild turtles and children, local, state and national conservation groups have called on organizers of Bel Air's Fourth of July festivities to cancel their annual turtle derby, one of the largest held in the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 1, 2014
Fells Point corner establishment Todd Conner's has been around for a number of years and up to this point, never registered on my radar as a place that had a cocktail list. To be fair, it does, in fact, have one. But it's fairly new so it's my fault for not stopping by more often. I'll take my punishment later - no time like the present to enjoy some recently created, frequently rotating libations courtesy of the ol' Todd. Todd Conner's new-ish cocktail program is spearheaded by bartender Paull ("with two Ls")
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
It's one for the medical textbooks -- a 93-pound sea turtle that couldn't see, but whose sight was saved by cataract surgery.The loggerhead turtle still is recovering and could use a pair of spectacles.A team of ophthalmologists -- an animal eye doctor and a human eye doctor -- performed successful surgery on the turtle June 11 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to give it a fighting chance to return to the wild.Aquarium officials said they believe it was the first time a sea turtle had undergone surgery for cataracts.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | October 12, 1994
BACK BAY, Va. -- The crashing waves off the coast here never looked so good . . . at least to this far-sighted sea turtle.Having had his sight restored by Baltimore surgeons, he swam off to freedom yesterday and into the annals of medical history, the only sea turtle to have undergone cataract surgery."
NEWS
November 9, 1994
One of Maryland's shyest, most elusive creatures -- the North American bog turtle, or Clemmys muhlenbergii -- may delay the construction of Carroll County's long-sought Hampstead bypass. State officials told the county's elected leaders last week that the small reptile was recently spotted in a wetland located on the north end of the highway's proposed path. Because of that sighting, transportation officials said they may be forced to design a new route for the $35 million highway to avoid the turtle's habitat.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
A 2-foot-long sea turtle appears to be healing nicely at the National Aquarium in Baltimore after being struck by a houseboat near Ocean City.Aquarium specialists were preparing to truck the turtle to Assateague State Park today and, after tagging it, to set it free.The 70-pound juvenile loggerhead turtle was struck Saturday. Bleeding and dazed, he was picked up in the Isle of Wight Bay by other boaters who saw the accident. They turned the reptile over to the Ocean City Coast Guard station.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
A 2-foot-long sea turtle appears to be healing nicely at the National Aquarium in Baltimore after being struck by a houseboat near Ocean City."If everything checks out all right . . . we will probably release him pretty quickly . . . [perhaps] by the end of the week," said animal-care specialist Cheryl Messinger.The 70-pound juvenile loggerhead turtle was struck Saturday. Bleeding and dazed, he was picked up in the Isle of Wight Bay by other boaters who saw the accident. They turned the reptile over to the Ocean City Coast Guard station.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | October 20, 2007
What is this huge turtle I found in my yard? The shell is 12 inches long, 8 inches high, and light brown with black squares. We took the turtle to the state park and let it go near water so it wouldn't get hit by a car. The African leopard tortoise you found was undoubtedly someone's pet. This animal can grow to 20 inches. Try to retrieve the tortoise and contact your neighbors to find out who lost it. Also, alert park staff, so they can be on the lookout for the tortoise and help save it. If the tortoise is not found and brought indoors, it will not survive the winter.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Police conducting a search warrant in West Baltimore got a surprise when they encountered three alligators, a pit bull and a turtle.  On Nov. 21 police raided a second-floor apartment in the 1900 block of McCulloh St., in the Druid Heights neighborhood, where they found smoking devices, razors, and baggies with drug residue, and ammunition, police wrote in a court documents. Also in the hallway: two alligators and a turtle. A pit bull was in the kitchen, and another alligator was found in the rear second-floor bedroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
Casi Dow and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
I may have been a little too excited for the premiere of "Top Chef New Orleans. " I had a dream the night before that I was on the show and immediately thrown into a Quickfire Challenge. This was an issue because: 1) I am not a chef, barely a home cook - as evidenced by my dinner of toast and cereal last night; and 2) the challenge was to create a meal out of jellybeans. And I don't mean cooking with jellybeans. I mean that's all we had. A pile of jellybeans. We were asked to put what flavors we thought would work well together on a plate and serve them to Tom Colicchio.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
In "college town" Towson, even the sports bar needs our tax money to build up and sell more booze ("State board OKs Greene Turtle loan," Aug. 22). The Green Turtle got a state-approved loan in 1995. Now, it borrows $893,000, $240,000 from Maryland, to add 60 roof seats to 120 enclosed seats. Interesting that the previous day's newspaper reviewed a legislator arrested for drunken driving ("Del. Dwyer charged with driving under the influence," Aug. 21). Greater Baltimore Medical Center helped me in 1992, guaranteeing to the bank 100 percent of my independent medical practice loan of $50,000.
NEWS
August 24, 2013
As a previous small business owner, I agree with Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot and others who want to dismiss the idea of using a state loan (as well as Baltimore County taxpayers' money) to renovate The Greene Turtle in Towson ("Don't fear this Turtle," Aug. 21). What makes this business so special to acquire county and state money? I live in Harford County and see every season the fall of local establishments. That's the gamble you take when owning a business. The family owners should look on their side and think "what are we doing wrong?"
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The state Board of Public Works approved Wednesday a controversial loan to the owners of the Greene Turtle franchise in Towson over the objections of Comptroller Peter Franchot. Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp joined Gov. Martin O'Malley in voting in favor of the $240,000 loan after saying her concerns about the deal had been resolved. The issue was deferred at the board's meeting last month after Kopp raised questions about the loan. Franchot restated his opposition, contending that Towson is not the type of blighted community that is intended to benefit from the Neighborhood Business Works program.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
It is not every day that a state senator objects to a business in his district receiving a state-subsidized loan to renovate or revitalize a building. Sen. James Brochin's opposition to a proposed $240,000 loan to The Greene Turtle in Towson rests on one principle - that government shouldn't be in the business of subsidizing business. "There are many other businesses in my district that are expanding and hiring people that are as worthy as Greene Turtle ," Mr. Brochin wrote in an Aug. 14 letter to two of the three members of the Board of Public Works.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
Among the thousands of visitors to the National Aquarium in Baltimore this summer is a rare, endangered sea turtle. But aquarium officials hope his - or her - stay is a short one. An injured Kemp's ridley sea turtle arrived at the aquarium last week after being rescued near Hoopers Island on the Eastern Shore. The 20-inch turtle, measured by its shell, was found with a recreational fishing hook lodged deep in its throat, just above the stomach, and a flesh injury along the side of its mouth, likely caused by the fishing line.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
It is an argument often heard that Maryland has an unfriendly business climate. It is doubtful that opinion is shared by the owners of the Greene Turtle, a sports bar in Towson undergoing expansion that has been selected to receive a $240,000 state loan. The loan might have gone largely unnoticed had not politicians started raising questions over whether this is the best use of public money. Two members of the three-member state Board of Public Works, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy Kopp, have asked why a sports bar in the middle of a booming college town cannot finance its own expansion.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
An O'Malley administration plan to lend $240,000 to a Towson sports bar to finance its expansion is raising questions about the role of government in promoting economic development. This week, the Board of Public Works opted to delay deciding whether to approve the loan to the Greene Turtle in Towson, whose franchise owners want to double its size to meet an anticipated increase in competition from nearby projects. State and local development officials called the loan necessary to keep downtown Towson vibrant, especially at a time when private financing is difficult to secure.
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