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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A French country chateau on a private island sounds like something from an episode of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous," but it can be found as close by as the Gibson Island community in Anne Arundel County. Built of fieldstone in 1926 and sitting on almost 1.5 acres of land, the house at 803 Rackham Road is an impressive structure featuring a two-story turret and a three-story tower with panoramic views of the Magothy River and Chesapeake Bay. "This house is an absolute treasure," said Ellie Shorb, listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A French country chateau on a private island sounds like something from an episode of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous," but it can be found as close by as the Gibson Island community in Anne Arundel County. Built of fieldstone in 1926 and sitting on almost 1.5 acres of land, the house at 803 Rackham Road is an impressive structure featuring a two-story turret and a three-story tower with panoramic views of the Magothy River and Chesapeake Bay. "This house is an absolute treasure," said Ellie Shorb, listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2002
HATTERAS, N.C. - Navy divers running short of time, money and favorable weather gingerly lifted the 120-ton turret of the USS Monitor from the Atlantic yesterday, salvaging a chapter of naval history. Rusty, covered with barnacles and still sporting the dents inflicted by Confederate shells during its only battle 140 years ago, the Monitor's massive iron turret was lifted from the sea shortly before sunset. It was greeted with waves of exultant cheers from more than 100 Navy divers who had worked six weeks to salvage the massive Civil War relic.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
She is 71 years old, and she has no memory of his voice. But that was her father on the recording, and he called her his "Margaret Ann. " She was glad she was alone when she heard him speak, she said. It was just such a surprise. His voice was so clear, he sounded so much like the rest of his Catonsville family. He spoke slowly and gently. He sounded calm. Sgt. Cody L. Wolf, a turret gunner, died when his plane was shot down over Germany on Jan. 11, 1944. It was just weeks after his holiday greeting had been recorded as part of a 1943 Sunpapers Christmas Show produced by the newspaper's war correspondents in England.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
HATTERAS, N.C. - Just after midnight on the last day of 1862, the U.S. Navy's famed ironclad warship, the USS Monitor, foundered while under tow in a storm off Cape Hatteras. Sea water poured in under the ship's 22-foot-wide rotating gun turret. It doused the ship's boilers, silenced its steam engine and stilled its pumps. The Monitor - veteran of the historic clash with the Confederate ironclad Merrimac 10 months earlier - was sinking, and its sailors were scrambling to escape their iron coffin before it plunged 220 feet to the bottom.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2002
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Jeff Johnston crouches low with his hammer and chisel, tapping patiently at what looks like dirty concrete surrounding a piece of rusted iron. His hardened-steel tools resound, the sound rising up from the bottom of a deep, 20-foot-wide shaft that resembles a giant, mineral-encrusted water main. For more than eight weeks now, Johnston and his fellow archaeologists have battled this stubborn material for hours at a time, laboring to unlock the secrets of one of history's most famous warships.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - It was pleasant, "clear and pleasant," as the Monitor prepared to leave Hampton Roads on Dec. 29, 1862, light winds out of the southwest. The sailors were excited. After months of patrol duty that held none of the thrill of the great Battle of Hampton Roads, Va., they'd received orders to sail to Beaufort, N.C., then on to Charleston, S.C., for possible engagement with Confederate forces. But this time they were being towed. An almost disastrous trip from New York 10 months ago convinced the Navy that while the Monitor might have been a scrappy fighter, it was plain unseaworthy in rough conditions.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Navy divers excavating the sunken turret of the USS Monitor off Cape Hatteras found bone fragments yesterday that could be remains of crewmen who went down with the famed warship 140 years ago. Officials working at the site, 20 miles off the North Carolina coast, said military scientists will analyze the fragments to determine whether they are the remains of Civil War sailors deserving of a naval burial more than a century after their death. `An effect on all of us' The discovery was a sobering reminder that the ironclad shipwreck, with its prized 150-ton turret made of Baltimore iron, served for decades as a gravesite for four U.S. Navy officers and 12 crewmen who failed to escape when the Monitor sank during a storm off the cape on Dec. 31, 1862.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - At night on the Atlantic, a pumpkin half-moon casts the ribs of a giant crane in silhouette as the barge it rests on rocks with the rhythms of the Gulf Stream. Sixteen miles off Cape Hatteras, calm and clear. The salvage barge Wotan seems a living creature, 300 feet long. Generators constantly hum, TV monitors glow, loudspeakers carry the rasping sounds of breathing: ahh, hahh, ahh, hahh. On deck is a small city, with sleeping quarters that look like condos three stories high, connected by stairways and catwalks.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - On a sultry day in midsummer, John D. Broadwater dons a headset in a small control shack as Navy divers lower themselves into the turret of the Monitor. Just days before, a huge crane had lifted a 32-ton piece of the famous ship's deck and armor plating off the turret, exposing it for the first time in 140 years. The rasping, metallic sound of the divers' breaths fills the shack. "If you can get in closer and get a little more detail, it would be helpful," he tells one of the divers carrying a video camera.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
Architectural and decorative detail are built into this Charles Village Victorian house. The main floor's high ceilings have plaster relief designs, some leafy, some geometric. Underfoot, the wood floors feature parquet patterns with distinctive border designs. Deep crown moldings, marble fireplaces and pocket doors add to the picture. A turret distinguishes the house, its windows making the parlor and a third-floor suite bright. "There are lots of arches in this house. You see them repeated in the hallways," said Brett Cohen.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Five years after Navy divers pulled it from the seas off Cape Hatteras, N.C., the massive cast-iron propeller of the USS Monitor is nearing the end of the conservation process and being prepared for public display at the Mariners' Museum. So, too, are dozens of pieces of machinery associated with the famous Civil War ship's steam engine, which was recovered in 2001, and numerous personal artifacts rescued from the inside of the gun turret after it was retrieved in 2002.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2002
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Jeff Johnston crouches low with his hammer and chisel, tapping patiently at what looks like dirty concrete surrounding a piece of rusted iron. His hardened-steel tools resound, the sound rising up from the bottom of a deep, 20-foot-wide shaft that resembles a giant, mineral-encrusted water main. For more than eight weeks now, Johnston and his fellow archaeologists have battled this stubborn material for hours at a time, laboring to unlock the secrets of one of history's most famous warships.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2002
HATTERAS, N.C. - Navy divers running short of time, money and favorable weather gingerly lifted the 120-ton turret of the USS Monitor from the Atlantic yesterday, salvaging a chapter of naval history. Rusty, covered with barnacles and still sporting the dents inflicted by Confederate shells during its only battle 140 years ago, the Monitor's massive iron turret was lifted from the sea shortly before sunset. It was greeted with waves of exultant cheers from more than 100 Navy divers who had worked six weeks to salvage the massive Civil War relic.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - At night on the Atlantic, a pumpkin half-moon casts the ribs of a giant crane in silhouette as the barge it rests on rocks with the rhythms of the Gulf Stream. Sixteen miles off Cape Hatteras, calm and clear. The salvage barge Wotan seems a living creature, 300 feet long. Generators constantly hum, TV monitors glow, loudspeakers carry the rasping sounds of breathing: ahh, hahh, ahh, hahh. On deck is a small city, with sleeping quarters that look like condos three stories high, connected by stairways and catwalks.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - It was pleasant, "clear and pleasant," as the Monitor prepared to leave Hampton Roads on Dec. 29, 1862, light winds out of the southwest. The sailors were excited. After months of patrol duty that held none of the thrill of the great Battle of Hampton Roads, Va., they'd received orders to sail to Beaufort, N.C., then on to Charleston, S.C., for possible engagement with Confederate forces. But this time they were being towed. An almost disastrous trip from New York 10 months ago convinced the Navy that while the Monitor might have been a scrappy fighter, it was plain unseaworthy in rough conditions.
NEWS
By Mark St. John Erickson and Mark St. John Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2003
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. -- Five years after Navy divers pulled it from the seas off Cape Hatteras, N.C., the massive cast-iron propeller of the USS Monitor is nearing the end of the conservation process and being prepared for public display at the Mariners' Museum. So, too, are dozens of pieces of machinery associated with the famous Civil War ship's steam engine, which was recovered in 2001, and numerous personal artifacts rescued from the inside of the gun turret after it was retrieved in 2002.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | December 30, 1990
A card table made for Thomas Willing, Colonial Philadelphia merchant, mayor and "reluctant rebel," is expected to bring between $1 million and $1.5 million when it is auctioned at Sotheby's on Feb. 1.Found in 1964 in a packing crate in the basement of a former bank at 305 Chestnut St. in Philadelphia, where it had been stored since 1898, it has been used for the last quarter century by a Pennsylvania family who are descendants of the original owners.Neither...
NEWS
By Edward Collimore and Edward Collimore,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 4, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - In the last frightening moments, the sailors mounted the gun turret of the famed Civil War ship and waited for rescue while mountainous waves crashed around them and the deck heaved beneath their feet. Many crewmen leaped from their perch to bobbing longboats. Some missed and drowned. Then, at 1 a.m. on Dec. 31, 1862, the ship's red-and-white lantern lights disappeared in the roiling Atlantic Ocean off Hatteras, N.C. "The Monitor is no more," wrote survivor William F. Keeler.
NEWS
By Paul Clancy and Paul Clancy,THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT | August 4, 2002
NORFOLK, Va. - On a sultry day in midsummer, John D. Broadwater dons a headset in a small control shack as Navy divers lower themselves into the turret of the Monitor. Just days before, a huge crane had lifted a 32-ton piece of the famous ship's deck and armor plating off the turret, exposing it for the first time in 140 years. The rasping, metallic sound of the divers' breaths fills the shack. "If you can get in closer and get a little more detail, it would be helpful," he tells one of the divers carrying a video camera.
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