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By GEORGE F. WILL | March 19, 1992
Trenton, New Jersey. -- It has been said that Britain is an island, France is a nation, Germany is a language and Egypt is a river. In the jaundiced eyes of many Americans, New Jersey is a river of concrete, a turnpike. It is a state to be gotten through to get somewhere else. But for students of contemporary politics and governance, New Jersey is a fascinating lesson in the limits of both.Both are the business of Donald DiFrancesco, 47. He is one of the people in American politics usually referred to as ''unsung,'' and he would probably prefer to stay that way, considering the anti-political lyrics of the moment.
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NEWS
March 16, 2013
(Reuters) - A bus carrying a university women's lacrosse team crashed on the Pennsylvania Turnpike on Saturday, killing the driver and one of the passengers, turnpike and hospital officials said. In addition to the driver, the bus was carrying 23 students and three coaches from Seton Hill University, a Catholic school in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, turnpike spokesman Bill Capone said. Head Coach Kristie Quigley and Assistant Coach Cristen Sanfilippoi, are both from Baltimore, according to the team's website.
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FEATURES
By Vincent Canby and Vincent Canby,New York Times News Service | February 18, 1991
Dan Aykroyd wrote the screenplay for, co-stars in and make his debut as a movie director with "Nothing But Trouble," a charmless feature-length joke about the world's most elaborate speed trap.It's somewhere off the New Jersey Turnpike, a place called Valkenvania, presided over by an ancient justice of the peace named Alvin Valkenheiser (Mr. Aykroyd).The movie is about the one wild night spent in Valkenheiser's dungeons by Chevy Chase, Demi Moore and other unlucky motorists, all arrested by the Valkenvania sheriff (John Candy)
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
A college lacrosse coach from Baltimore County died after the team's bus crashed on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, also killing the driver and injuring 20 others Saturday morning, authorities said. Kristina Quigley, 30, the head coach for the Seton Hill University women's lacrosse team, died in the crash near Carlisle, Pa. Quigley, now of Greensburg, Pa., was six months pregnant. She died after being flown by helicopter to Penn State Hershey Medical Center, said turnpike spokesman Bill Capone.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 2000
SECAUCUS, N.J. -- Every car owner eventually meets that one road in life with a personality that must be confronted or avoided, cajoled or negotiated on a daily basis, and perhaps no road has a personality as widely known as the New Jersey Turnpike, the service entrance to New York City. The turnpike is the fast lane to New Jersey's personality. It is everything everybody else says about New Jersey -- paved, crowded, smelly in the summer, bleak in the winter, a passage to somewhere more desirable.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Mortified by what he calls Pennsylvania' callous treatment of the man who drove the national Christmas tree to Washington, state Rep. John Lawless says he wants to repay the $266 that a truck driver shelled out to get the tree off the Pennsylvania Turnpike.So, he said yesterday, he intends to dip into his campaign funds, find out the address of the Minnesota veterans' organization that already has reimbursed trucker Dick Willie and send the money to the club."I don't know what the ethics rule is on using campaign funds," he said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- What if Pennsylvanians had been asked this question a decade ago:Should we tear down the tollbooths on the Pennsylvania Turnpike and let people drive free, or should we authorize new turnpike construction and raise the tolls?Is there any doubt what the outcome would have been?The Pennsylvania legislature did take up that question in 1985. To anyone familiar with the workings of the legislature and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, the decision would be no surprise: Legislators voted to authorize construction and raise the tolls perpetuating a system that provides benefits for politicians and jobs for their friends.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- As drivers on the Pennsylvania Turnpike fume at interchange detours and backed-up exit ramps, it's not just time they're wasting.Electronic tolls save money in wasted fuel and productivity. After the system was installed in Oklahoma, hydrocarbon emissions were reduced by 83 percent, carbon monoxide by 75 percent, and nitrous oxide by 50 percent, according to the Intelligent Transportation Society of America.And with the turnpike's congestion, you might think electronic toll collection would be among the commission's top priorities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 1998
Electronic toll collection that eliminates the need to stop and pay tolls, known as E-Z Pass, is available to motorists using the Delaware Turnpike (Interstate 95).As motorists drive through the E-Z Pass toll lanes on the turnpike, an overhead antenna reads account information from an electronic "tag" affixed to the vehicle and the toll amount is deducted from their prepaid account.The system is widely used in New York City.Applications are available by calling 888-288-6865.Pub Date: 11/13/98
NEWS
November 12, 2006
Triadelphia Turnpike "ELLICOTT CITY - The Triadelphia road, in the first district of Howard County, was formally transferred [yesterday] by the county commissioners to the Triadelphia Turnpike Company. ... Several miles of the pike have already been finished, a large force of hands are now employed, and work is being rapidly pushed forward. The new road when completed will prove of great advantage and convenience to a large number of farmers in Howard County, and a considerable portion of Montgomery County, who heretofore have experienced much inconvenience in hauling their produce over soft roads."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
The local trucker who police say was driving the tanker that leaked a 40-mile ribbon of roofing asphalt onto the Pennsylvania Turnpike last week, snarling holiday traffic and damaging hundreds of cars, has been issued two tickets. George Delaney, 50, of Glen Burnie, received citations from Pennsylvania State Police for failure to secure a load and failure to obey a state trooper. The trucking company, MTS Express LLC of Stevensville, has placed Delaney on administrative leave and impounded the truck.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
A bus from New York to Baltimore caught fire around noon Saturday and became "fully engulfed" in flames on the southbound side of the New Jersey Turnpike, police said. There were 11 passengers on board the bus and all were evacuated unharmed, said a spokesman for the Cranbury Station of the New Jersey State Police. The fire took place near Exit 8A, about three hours north of Baltimore on Interstate 95. "The fire started after a right rear tire blow out, the driver pulled over to assess the situation, then continued to the nearest service station before noticing smoke coming from the rear wheel well," Simon Fitzgerald, a passenger on the bus, said in an e-mail Saturday evening.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,gettingthere@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Many Americans are pinning high hopes on the economic stimulus bill that President Barack Obama stampeded through Congress last week: millions of jobs, repairs to crumbling infrastructure and a defibrillator jolt to the flat-lining economy. But could Big Stim also help end the notorious backups at Delaware's Interstate 95 toll plaza? Delaware Gov. Jack Markell thinks so. The boss rooster of the Blue Hen State announced last week - in advance of the final vote on the $787 billion package - that the bill could help relieve backups at the Newark toll plaza by speeding a project to add two E-ZPass lanes in each direction.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 7, 2008
Gas crisis or no, millions of Americans are hitting the road this summer, and many will travel that magical stretch of road known as the New Jersey Turnpike, where they'll stop at its various service areas which are, well, not so magical. These are named after great Americans, for some reason, and include the Vince Lombardi Service Area, the Thomas Edison Service Area, the Grover Cleveland Service Area, the Molly Pitcher Service Area and so on. You wonder what someone like Thomas Edison would think about having a rest stop named after him. This was maybe the greatest inventor in history, the man who gave us the electric lightbulb, the phonograph and 1,000 other inventions.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 3, 2007
So here comes another slick move by our grubby little neighbor state to the northeast, which exists for the sole purpose of annoying the tens of thousands of out-of-state motorists who pass through it every day. I speak here, of course, of Delaware, which has just raised its tolls and will now charge you $4 instead of $3 for the pleasure of traveling the grim, traffic-choked, 11-mile stretch of Interstate 95 known as the Delaware Turnpike. And you get hammered for the 4 bucks in both directions, too!
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2006
Bringing a fledgling privatization trend from the Midwest to Maryland's doorstep, Pennsylvania Gov. Edward G. Rendell is seeking offers for the sale or long-term lease of the Pennsylvania Turnpike - a nearly 70-year-old icon of innovative American engineering. Rendell's objective is to raise billions of dollars for Pennsylvania transportation projects that otherwise might require increased taxes. His model: Indiana, where an Australian-Spanish conglomerate owns a toll road. The turnpike was the first major U.S. toll road of the automobile era and a prototype for the Interstate Highway System.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 16, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - The Pennsylvania Turnpike's numbers are almost up. The turnpike commission said the familiar interchange numbers - from No. 1 on the Ohio border to No. 30, 359 miles away at the Delaware River Bridge, to No. 39 in the Poconos - will be phased out in favor of milepost numbers. By spring, new signs will show both the old exit numbers and the new ones. The Valley Forge exit, known since the mid-1950s as Exit 24, will become Exit 24/326. In about two years, when the old numbers are dropped altogether, it will become Exit 326. The oft-quaint names, such as Wyoming Valley, Donegal and Willow Hill, will remain.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | February 18, 1994
KISSIMMEE, Fla. -- "Strong odor -- next four miles -- do not stop -- keep moving."That's the message motorists get from flashing signs on a stretch of Florida's Turnpike near the Yeehaw Junction exit.This is one smell you don't want a whiff of. In fact, the air near this southern Osceola County town is so foul this week that at least two people got sick, prompting the state to action."We put those up to keep people from stopping there, possibly inhaling it and getting sick," Kim Poulton, a Turnpike spokeswoman, said yesterday.
NEWS
November 12, 2006
Triadelphia Turnpike "ELLICOTT CITY - The Triadelphia road, in the first district of Howard County, was formally transferred [yesterday] by the county commissioners to the Triadelphia Turnpike Company. ... Several miles of the pike have already been finished, a large force of hands are now employed, and work is being rapidly pushed forward. The new road when completed will prove of great advantage and convenience to a large number of farmers in Howard County, and a considerable portion of Montgomery County, who heretofore have experienced much inconvenience in hauling their produce over soft roads."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 15, 2004
THIS IS A STORY that will either make you smile and reaffirm your faith in humanity, or make you sad that an incident like this is even considered a big deal in this day and age. It begins the other day after we drove up to see my in-laws on Long Island for my niece's high-school graduation party. We'd been there a few minutes when my wife said to me: "Go out to the car and get my purse, and we'll give Stephanie her present." Fine. I went out to the car. No purse. When I reported back that there was no purse - and therefore no present for the happy graduate - my wife gave a start, as if someone jabbed her with a cattle prod.
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