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Turning Point

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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
The conviction of a former Baltimore County man in a deadly hotel bombing in Indonesia is seen as a turning point in the long-delayed prosecution of terror suspects at Guantanamo Bay. Majid Shoukat Khan, who on Wednesday admitted to conspiring with Osama bin Laden and 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammad in plots in Indonesia, Pakistan and the United States, is the first of the 14 so-called high-value detainees at Guantanamo Bay to be convicted....
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NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 30, 1994
Coincidental, accidental pairings appear on tonight's schedule: "The Cosby Mysteries" has a show about twins, directly opposite the twin stars of "Sister, Sister." And "48 Hours" looks at romantic scam artists -- the same topic explored on a competing series, "Law & Order."* "The Cosby Mysteries" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2) -- Stephen Schnetzer plays two roles in tonight's show, appearing as twin brothers -- but one of them is very quickly killed. A corpse is a corpse, of course, of course, but how do you tell which twin is the corpse?
NEWS
August 8, 2014
After months of hesitation, President Barack Obama has authorized the use of U.S. military force, including limited airstrikes, against Islamic militants in Iraq who in recent months have overrun large parts of the country and now threaten the northern city of Erbil as well as tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians trapped atop a barren mountain where they sought refuge after fleeing their homes. Up to now Mr. Obama has gone out of his way to avoid American involvement in the multiple conflicts roiling the region, including the bitter civil war in Syria that has claimed more than 140,000 lives and given rise to a radical extremist group, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, that now controls large swaths of territory on both sides of the Syrian-Iraqi border.
NEWS
October 19, 1992
Some highlights are easily observed in the history of Baltimore City. Such as the first charter in 1796. A number of annexations that expanded the city to its current borders. The great fire of 1904. The exodus of the middle class that began after World War II and continues unabated.Baltimore has now reached another turning point. For the first time in its recorded history, the wealth contributed by residents through income taxes has declined. While statewide taxable income edged up from $55.4 billion to $56.4 billion between 1990 and 1991, city residents' taxable income fell from $4.86 billion to $4.85 billion, according to data from the state comptroller's office.
SPORTS
By Dave Glassman and Dave Glassman,Contributing Writer | February 27, 1992
Not surprisingly, the coach and his leading scorer have a slight disagreement. Nothing major, but each sees a different turning point in Catonsville's 19-2 season.To coach Art Gamzon, the Comets' 12-point loss to Lake Clifton in a Christmas tournament, "was an awfully big game for us. I think we gained their respect because we hung on until the last few minutes. The kids became convinced this would be another special season."Teron Owens, the Comets' slender 6-foot-3 senior tri-captain and leading scorer (21.2 points)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 28, 1994
I'm a little wary of writing advance reviews of newsmagazines these days, since current events -- Haiti being the most recent example -- have a way of taking precedence and pre-empting, if only temporarily, the segments sent out for preview. However, tonight's scheduled "Turning Point" report is sufficiently riveting to take the chance.* "Baseball" (8 p.m.-10:30 p.m., Channels 22, 67) -- Ken Burns, I suspect, is the historian's equivalent of a classical-music critic -- the closer he gets to the present day in terms of his chosen field, the less fun he has. The last quarter-century of baseball is crammed into this final installment, and, with instant replay rising to the fore and making images almost too common, there's a little less grace in this concluding episode than in all those before it. I also feel, quite strongly, that Mr. Burns ended "Baseball" prematurely, before getting to the 1993 Phillies-Toronto Blue Jays World Series.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
A turning point can be as sweeping as a rickety wood-and-cloth contraption taking flight for the first time, as seemingly inconsequential as the color of a chicken. Sometimes we see them coming. Often we don't, and only in hindsight is it possible to pick out the moment that changed an individual, a product, an industry, the world. Clear as day or shrouded in obscurity, pivotal ideas and events are happening all the time, ripples that turn into tidal waves. Today, The Sun explores people, places and things that seem poised for a turning point in the world of business in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 17, 1992
"Don't be taken in by appearances," they tell us. "You can't eat atmosphere." They have a point; I, too, have eaten my share of lousy meals in charming rooms-with-views.Wait till you see the Turning Point Inn, though. Sitting far back from the road, surrounded by lawns and trees, its Georgian beauty beckons the visitor down the long drive. Could such a handsome place offer anything but delectable food?Inside, the inn (which offers bed-and-breakfast as well as meals) was still decorated for the holidays, with a Victorian Christmas tree dominating the foyer.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 8, 2007
Roots, the ABC miniseries based on Alex Haley's novel about his family's ancestry, not only changed the face of television when it premiered in 1977, it also radically altered the culture in ways that are still being felt today - 30 years later. TV One, the Maryland-based cable channel seen in 36.6 million homes and targeted to African-American viewers, tonight will mark the anniversary with the first of six evenings of Roots. The miniseries will be accompanied by vignettes about the impact of Roots and appearances by cast members including LeVar Burton, Louis Gossett Jr., Richard Roundtree, Leslie Uggams and Ben Vereen.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 17, 2013
The greatest words any American ever said were spoken by a gaunt, war-haunted man in a tiny Pennsylvania college town 150 years ago Tuesday. The celebrated orator Edward Everett had spoken first, a gusty address that began with a nod toward "this serene sky, overlooking these broad fields now reposing from the labors of the waning year," and wheezed to a close two hours later with a reference to "the glorious annals of our common country....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
The turning point for the Wham City Comedy Tour came at a gig in Buffalo, N.Y. And, in typical Wham City fashion, it took some unexpected chaos and quick improvisation to reach it. On Monday, the tour - which consists of six comedians from the city's experimental arts collective Wham City and a director, all traveling the Northeast and Midwest in a white van for about three weeks this month - played an arts gallery/performance space called the...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
No. 15 Johns Hopkins' 7-4 upset of No. 4 Maryland on Saturday at Byrd Stadium in College Park has the potential to be a turning point for the program, which had just labored through a four-game stretch in which it had lost three times - including two in a row. But senior midfielder John Ranagan, who sparked the Blue Jays (7-4) with a three-point effort on two goals and one assist, did not take the bait on articulating the significance of the victory over the Terps. “I'm not really sure,” he said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The owner of a Baltimore substance abuse center led a protest of more than 120 people Thursday morning at the doors of Johns Hopkins Hospital, saying the medical giant owes his organization more than $100,000 in Medicaid payments. The Rev. Milton E. Williams, who operates the Turning Point Substance Abuse Clinic in East Baltimore, said his organization had provided hundreds of patients with free care because a Hopkins affiliate has not reimbursed it for treating Medicaid patients.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
The fate of the Chesapeake Bay may be found in its tributaries. Mattawoman Creek, one of the bay's healthiest, is losing ground to development and now stands "at a turning point" as Charles County plans for future growth in its watershed, a state-led task force warns. The combined state-federal task force, led by the Department of Natural Resources , says that the Mattawoman is losing the "near to the ideal" condition that characterized its waters nearly two decades ago. Although its watershed is still largely forested, and the stream itself retains one of the state's most diverse populations of fish, "possible signs of stress associated with human development have appeared.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 27, 1993
Los Angeles -- The networks aren't really introducing a new prime-time newsmagazine every week. It just seems that way.This week there is another new one, though, as ABC News premieres "Turning Point" at 10 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13).The concept for the show is based on the belief that there are key points in time when people's lives are changed forever -- when "history hangs in the balance," to use ABC's description of a turning point. Using various ABC News correspondents, the magazine will deal with one such stories each week in its hourlong format.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Reporter | November 18, 2007
The Navy defense had been pushed around all season, giving up points with abandon, including 209 in its past five games. But yesterday, with the Midshipmen's starting quarterback sidelined, the defense pushed back and anchored Navy's 35-24 victory over Northern Illinois. Navy vs. Army Dec. 1, noon, M&T Bank Stadium, chs. 13, 9, 1090 AM
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
With Osama bin Laden dead, the war in Iraq over and the war in Afghanistan winding down, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told graduating midshipmen Tuesday to prepare themselves for "one of the key projects" of their generation: building American strength in the Asia-Pacific region. "America's future prosperity and security are tied to our ability to advance peace and security along the arc extending from the Western Pacific and East Asia into the Indian Ocean and South Asia," he told the Class of 2012 during the graduation ceremony at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2012
On the heels of one of the most uplifting road trips in recent memory, the Orioles suddenly find themselves at their first critical juncture of the young season, but here's the reason that it might not suck all the wind out of their terrific start: For once, they weren't blindsided by it. Two bullpen-busting marathons in Boston forced the front office to make a series of roster moves this week, and the struggles of starters Tommy Hunter, Brian...
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