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Turners Station

NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
The people in the small, isolated southeastern Baltimore County village of Turners Station don't know the ins and outs of a $1.1 billion county budget that's controlled from faraway Towson.But they know what it means when their recreation center worker is promoted to a new location and not replaced, and when their community building, a former school house called the Fleming Center, isn't being cleaned or maintained properly.They also know how to call a meeting and complain. In fact, they've called two, and they're still complaining.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2003
Fannie Posey Major Parsons, a businesswoman and community leader known as "Momma" by the legions of Turners Station residents who looked to her for guidance, died Thursday at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 98 and died of apparent heart failure. Mrs. Parsons was considered a pioneer of the once-bustling Dundalk enclave that was home to hundreds of African-American steelworkers and their families. Family members said that besides owning the community's first coin-operated laundry and High's dairy store, she was the first woman in Turners Station to get a driver's license and own a car. She was said to have the first telephone, and opened her doors to others who wanted to use it. It seemed she knew everybody, and everyone knew her. "All the little kids on the street -- she knew who their parents were and their parents' parents," said her granddaughter, Angela Faidley of Essex.
NEWS
By Jazzmen Tynes and Jazzmen Tynes,sun reporter | July 21, 2007
Four years ago, residents of the Turners Station area of Dundalk took stock of their community and found plenty of room for improvement. A lack of streetlights made some spots attractive to drug dealers. Alleys and sidewalks were crumbling and in need of repair. Some aging houses presented safety hazards, and zoning regulations dictated that vacant lots were too narrow for new homes big enough to attract families.
NEWS
September 24, 2007
Rosa V. Adams, a homemaker and longtime resident of Sparrows Point and Turners Station, died Tuesday of complications from dementia at Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital. She was 85. She was born Rosa Cragway in Bent Creek, Va., and moved with her family to Sparrows Point in 1928 when her father took a job as a laborer at Bethlehem Steel Corp. "She grew up in the 800 block of J St., one of two streets designated for blacks on Sparrows Point, the town Bethlehem built for its workers," said her son, Michael Adams, an assistant city editor for The Sun. "She attended an all-black elementary school within walking distance of the sprawling steel mill, but Sparrows Point did not have a black high school, and there were none elsewhere in Baltimore County," he said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
When the covers were pulled away, Kweisi Mfume could hardly believe it: KWEISI MFUME COURT, proclaimed the two signs that were posted high on the sides of two townhouses in the southeast Baltimore County community where he lived as a child."
NEWS
By Brendan Kearney and Jonathan D. Rockoff and Brendan Kearney and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
With a pride of place that comes with their decades of homeownership, some longtime Turners Station residents fondly recall the bustling community of old, while shaking their heads at signs of their beloved neighborhood's decline. Pointing to potholes in roads, deteriorating sidewalks, abandoned and dilapidated houses and waist-high weeds, these residents blame county officials for assuring them that the problems will be fixed, but then moving so slowly that little has been done. Although small in comparison with complaints of city neighborhoods just a five-minute drive away on Interstate 95, the concerns reflect the lingering heritage of a once-thriving black community whose blue-collar residents worked the steel mills at Sparrows Point and patronized neighborhood shops, a theater and semiprofessional ballpark.
NEWS
By Mia D. McNeil and Mia D. McNeil,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2000
Turners Station's new community center embraces history, but also caters to future generations. Seniors can enjoy their days at the Fleming Community Center with sewing, pool and card games, while children can entertain themselves with a large gym and playground, or use the 17 computers in the Kay Ruppersberger Learning Resource Center. The center, a gray-bricked complex in the middle of the historically black east-side community, had its grand opening on July 7. It houses a Baltimore County Department of Aging Senior Center, programs run by the Department of Recreation and Parks, a reading and learning center, and a soon-to-open Head Start Center.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1997
James Camp, a barber whose four-chair shop in Turners Station attracted an array of people daily to discuss politics, lack of money, wayward fashions, sports and other topics, died Wednesday of cancer at Joseph Richey Hospice in Baltimore. He was 84.Some of the people who went to Jimmy's Barber Shop on Oak Street even got a haircut, but they often seemed the minority."People would sometimes go there all day just to sit and talk," said Jim Barnes, for many years a customer of Mr. Camp and a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | March 9, 2007
Run-down house ignites dispute in Balto. County Code inspectors who visited an uninhabited house in the Turners Station community of Baltimore County last fall reported that the floor was bare earth and the sky could be seen through holes in the roof. After months of issuing citations, the county government is ready to send in the wrecking ball. But relatives of the woman who owns the house are fighting the government's plans to demolish it, saying the county illegally issued the citations and more than $90,000 in fines.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Janet M. Hamlett, a retired National Security Agency analyst and active church member, died Tuesday of cancer at Northwest Hospital. She was 63. The daughter of Olion Craig, a Bethlehem Steel Corp. steelworker, and Allie Mae Craig, a homemaker, the former Janet Maria Craig was born in Baltimore and raised in Turners Station. After graduating from Dundalk High School in 1968, Ms. Hamlett went to work as an NSA intelligence analyst at Fort Meade, where she also worked as a cryptologist.
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