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NEWS
November 15, 1991
Despite President Bush's pronouncement last week that the recession is over, there are millions of Americans who know full well that it isn't -- notably the 3 million people who are still out of work and whose unemployment benefits have run out.For them, and for many others facing benefit cutoffs soon, extended aid may be the only thing standing between them and impoverishment as they struggle to find work in a debilitated economy. Until recently, however, President Bush resisted extending unemployment benefits, vetoing or blocking two bills passed by Congress because, he said, paying for them would have "busted the budget."
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Emotional about Ray Rice's release and still stinging from a season-opening defeat, the Ravens play AFC North rival Pittsburgh Steelers in two days. The quick turnaround looms for the Ravens following a disappointing game Sunday in which they lost, 23-16, to the Cincinnati Bengals. The potential of falling into an 0-2 hole in the division makes the Steelers game a pivitol one for a team that just dismissed one of its top players. "It was a tough loss," veteran defensive end Chris Canty said.
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NEWS
March 29, 2006
Once asked for the key to success as a college basketball coach, John Wooden, the legendary former UCLA coach, reportedly replied with one word: recruiting. That certainly seems to be true for Brenda Frese, who, in her four years as the University of Maryland women's basketball coach, has relentlessly nabbed top recruits. The result has been a remarkable turnaround for UM's once-moribund women's program: three straight trips to the NCAA tournament, a No. 3 national ranking and, with a gutsy overtime victory over Utah (and the lingering effects of a team-wide scourge of stomach flu)
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
EXPLORE
September 9, 2011
I want to thank the police and other emergency personnel who helped to "evacuate" us from the flooded Route 29 south on Sept. 7. We spent about 35 minutes waiting for our chance to turn around and get onto 29 north, but there was no agitation or frustration as we all sat and waited for our turn. The situation was handled so smoothly that I wanted to cheer. Heather Dorst Oakland Mills
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 11, 2001
The mammoth ballroom at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel teemed with 850 guests gathered for Steppin' Out to the Rhythm and Blues -- TurnAround Inc.'s annual fund-raiser. A bar in the center of the room supplied drinks, while food stations scattered around the cavernous room offered specialties of the house from 50 area restaurants and caterers, with space left over on the dance floor to boogie to blues and Motown tunes. And, let's not forget that Mercedes and Harley Davidson motorcycle -- both parked in the middle of the room -- each up for grabs in raffles.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Chesapeake Biological Laboratories, the Baltimore-based drug manufacturing contractor, reported a $2.4 million profit yesterday for the year ending March 31 - a marked financial turnaround for a company that posted a $5.4 million loss last fiscal year . The profit, Chesapeake's first in three years, came after the company tapped former pharmaceutical industry executive Thomas P. Rice to take over in December 1998 as chief executive officer. At the time, Chesapeake had a new Baltimore plant but faced widening losses and needed more customers.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Pat Skerry has spent the past 30 minutes pacing the perimeter of the court, tossing out gentle pointers in his New England-inflected patter. One of his Towson Tigers fires an ill-conceived pass that ends up rattling among the seats at SECU Arena. The third-year coach abruptly morphs into a different animal. "Instead of acting like little kids, let's execute 'Hook' correctly," he bellows, referring to one of his team's plays. "Guard!" he barks after a subsequent defensive lapse.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | November 13, 1994
When John Collard was hired in 1988 to help revive Delta Data Systems, a board member of the troubled manufacturer voiced a concern: "It's not clear to me that you're tough enough," he told Mr. Collard.Puzzled by the remark at the time, Mr. Collard said he's learned since then that the toughness factor should be part of any job interview with a "turnaround" manager promising to fix a broken company."The thing to ask turnaround people is, 'When was the last time you went into a company and took 400 employees down to 200?
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1997
In another indication of a turnaround, McCormick & Co. Inc. yesterday reported its second straight quarter of earnings growth.The Sparks-based spice giant said that net income for the quarter that ended Feb. 28 was $15.2 million, up about 63 percent from $9.4 million in the year-ago period."
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Legg Mason plans to close a deal this month to restructure $650 million in debt, a move designed to lock in favorable interest rates for the long term while taking advantage of the market's sustained appetite for corporate bonds. The money raised from the sale will be used to pay off $650 million of notes due in 2019, which the Baltimore-based money manager issued two years ago at a rate of 5.5 percent. The firm's total debt of just over $1 billion would remain unchanged. Legg's decision to restructure debt follows the path of dozens of companies, including asset managers Invesco, Janus Capital Group and Icahn Enterprises, that have pursued refinancing in expectation of rising interest rates.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 27, 2014
Election year 2014 is the third time the Republican Party has hitched its wagon to the tea party. In 2010, angry tea partiers shouted down incumbents in town hall meetings, put Democrats into a defensive, crotch-covering crouch and delivered the House of Representatives to the GOP. In 2012, tea party zeal morphed into extreme stupidity and weirdness that freaked out moderate voters and wasted a Republican opportunity to win the Senate. Now, two years later, the tea party is both chastened and more entrenched.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
For top-seeded Duke, No. 5 Denver, No. 6 Notre Dame and No. 7 Maryland, Saturday's semifinal round of the NCAA tournament at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore takes center stage in terms of preparation and focus. But for two of those teams, Monday's title game is nearly as imposing. Championship weekend presents the two programs that advance to the tournament final with the unique dilemma of going all-out in Saturday's semifinals, recovering physically on Sunday, and finding enough in the fuel tank to play in Monday's final.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
After Johns Hopkins and Mount St. Mary's played Saturday with differing results -- the No. 9 Blue Jays beat No. 5 Maryland and the Mountaineers fell to Bryant -- both teams will share similar concerns as they head into Monday's 4 p.m. game at Waldron Family Stadium in Emmittsburg. Both sides will have to figure out how to rebound from physically taxing games and find enough energy to work for a victory. Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala has already called Monday's matchup “a trap game” that looms as a potential upset for the Blue Jays (7-3)
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Pat Skerry has spent the past 30 minutes pacing the perimeter of the court, tossing out gentle pointers in his New England-inflected patter. One of his Towson Tigers fires an ill-conceived pass that ends up rattling among the seats at SECU Arena. The third-year coach abruptly morphs into a different animal. "Instead of acting like little kids, let's execute 'Hook' correctly," he bellows, referring to one of his team's plays. "Guard!" he barks after a subsequent defensive lapse.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
In trying to sum up the past five years, Rob Ambrose thought back to his introductory press conference as Towson University's football coach. "I said, 'If we hadn't won some ball games by year three, I hope they had [a] good furniture budget, because I was going to break something,'" he recalled. By the time Ambrose was hired, the university and its boosters had become accustomed to such gung-ho talk from new coaches, few of whom delivered the winning programs Towson sought. "He came off to me as maybe a little too optimistic about what he could do," former Towson president Robert L. Caret said with a chuckle.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1997
The bankruptcy trustee for Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. sued Ernst & Young International Inc. yesterday for negligence and fraud, charging that the accounting and consulting firm's handling of the Maryland clothing retailer's turnaround led to its collapse.In the lawsuit, filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, trustee Deborah Hunt Devan seeks $1 billion in compensatory damages and $3 billion in punitive damages, plus costs and interest."We have not yet seen a copy of the complaint. We have no comment beyond that," said Patrice Ingrassia, a spokeswoman at Ernst & Young's New York headquarters.
NEWS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | December 29, 2008
The Ravens completed an improbable turnaround from a dysfunctional, 5-11 also-ran to confident playoff team yesterday behind a rookie quarterback and first-year coach. Playing in front of a full-throated crowd of 71,366 at M&T Bank Stadium, the Ravens thumped the Jacksonville Jaguars, 27-7, to clinch the sixth seed in the American Football Conference. Now 11-5, they will play the Miami Dolphins in South Florida next weekend in the first round of the NFL playoffs. -The Dolphins captured the AFC East title on the final weekend of the regular season with a 24-17 victory over New York Jets.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson | November 6, 2013
Tight end Dennis Pitta is closer than ever to returning, according to coach John Harbaugh. Pitta underwent surgery in July to repair a fractured and dislocated right hip and remains on the injured reserve-designated to return list. Pitta can return to practice whenever he's healthy enough. Without Pitta in the lineup, tight ends Dallas Clark and Ed Dickson have combined for only 32 catches for 375 yards and two touchdowns. “Everything I've been told is that he's on schedule, but I still think it's pretty vague and generic,” Harbaugh said of Pitta, who caught 61 passes for 669 yards and seven touchdowns last season.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
Even before Saturday night's pivotal Colonial Athletic Association showdown with No. 7 Towson, Delaware appeared to be fighting an uphill battle. Not only were the Tigers playing in the friendly confines of Johnny Unitas Stadium, but the No. 21 Blue Hens would also have to pull off the upset without starting junior quarterback Trent Hurley, who was injured in the team's 35-13 rout of Rhode Island a week ago. But Delaware did the unthinkable, scoring 22 unanswered points in the last 12 minutes of the fourth quarter to stun Towson, 32-31, before an announced 8,741.
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