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By TERRY TANG | May 21, 1995
Okay, it's only politics. But even by that standard, the Republican turnabout on Medicare is breathtaking.Last October, Washington Sen. Slade Gorton's TV ads criticized his opponent, Ron Sims, for supporting President Clinton's 1993 deficit-reduction package, focusing on a $56 billion cut to Medicare spread over five years. Not a single Republican in Congress voted for that budget, and most used it to pummel Democrats at the polls.Now the Republicans are about to go Mr. Clinton five times better.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Jurors in the theft trial of Sheila Dixon signaled Monday that they were stymied on one or more charges against the Baltimore mayor, then abruptly changed course and asked the judge to let them resume deliberations this morning. The flurry of activity, after six days of discussions and a four-day holiday break, gave no clear indication of where the jurors might be headed. After the jury forewoman dispatched a note declaring that the jurors "can not come to a unanymous[sic]
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a swift and highly unusual turnabout, a federal appeals court yesterday decided against allowing two Midwestern states to enforce their laws against a late-term abortion procedure.The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago acted 24 hours after it had cleared the way for Illinois and Wisconsin to put into effect laws that ban this method of ending pregnancies.Saying it was acting on its own, the court said it will reconsider a plea by abortion rights groups that the two laws be put on hold until the Supreme Court can rule on their constitutionality.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and John Fritze and Kelly Brewington and John Fritze,Sun reporters | October 2, 2007
Elated city leaders were fast to spread the news: For the first time in decades, Baltimore's population has increased, reversing a half-century of decline, according to revised estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Mayor Sheila Dixon announced the revised estimate yesterday, calling the nearly 900-person gain between 2005 and 2006 a "reversal of fortune." The new figures come after Baltimore officials challenged the city's 2006 estimate, released in June. The adjusted figure puts Baltimore's population as of July 1, 2006, at 640,961, up 897 from the 2005 Charm City count of 640,064.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ending a brief but giddy era of fiscal plenty, the Bush administration released figures yesterday showing that the projected federal budget surpluses outside of the Social Security system had dwindled to almost nothing for the next several years. For the current fiscal year, the administration estimated, the government would run a surplus outside of Social Security of about $600 million, almost negligible in a $1.9 trillion budget and a $10 trillion economy. In April, the White House had projected a surplus of $122 billion in the non-Social Security system for the fiscal year, which ends Sept.
NEWS
April 5, 1993
POLICE LOG* Wilde Lake: 6100 block of Turnabout Lane: Someone slashed four tires on a 1983 Ford Escort between midnight and 6 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
July 5, 1996
Police logWilde Lake: In the 6100 block of Turnabout Lane, someone tried to steal a 1991 Honda Accord Monday or Tuesday.
NEWS
August 1, 1996
An article about a shooting in Tuesday's Howard County edition of The Sun misstated the location of Turnabout Lane, which is in Columbia's Harper's Choice village.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/01/96
NEWS
October 19, 1994
POLICE LOG* Wilde Lake: 10400 Green Mountain Circle: Someone smashed a window at the Learnwood Child Development Center and stole pineapples Thursday night or Friday morning.* Harper's Choice: 5900 block of Turnabout Lane: Someone entered the Harpers Forest Apartments' rental office and stole cabinets between Friday at 3 p.m. and Monday at 10 a.m.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to the Sun | June 15, 2007
The upcoming 35th season of Annapolis Opera will be the last of Dennis Monk's presidency - four years of growth that moved the company from a shaky financial status to relative security. In a note to subscribers that accompanied the 2007-2008 season announcement, Monk lamented that classical music is not as accessible on radio and television as it was in decades past when opera luminaries such as Jan Peerce and Robert Merrill were frequent guests on popular radio and television shows. Concerned about the many people never exposed to opera, Monk said, "It is the company's mission to bring the best of opera close to home at affordable prices.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | June 11, 2007
When Marin Alsop starts her inaugural season as Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director in September, she'll have a tough act to follow - herself. As music director-designate this season, Alsop has already shaken things up considerably. If You Go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall; 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore. For tickets, call 410-783-8000 or go to baltimoresymphony.org.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A leading House Republican said the White House provided Congress for the first time yesterday with some operational details about the National Security Agency's warrantless domestic wiretapping program. "There are some operational issues that they still don't want to go into in detail," said Rep. Heather Wilson of New Mexico, who announced the apparent turnabout less than a day after she went public with criticism of the Bush administration's refusal to provide the information.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
Howard County police said yesterday that the two people who were shot Tuesday night in the Harper's Choice village of Columbia may have been involved in a continuing dispute with each other. Sherry Llewellyn, a police spokeswoman, said the department would only release the ages of the men involved - a 17-year-old and 22-year-old. Details about the dispute, the weapons involved and who instigated the shooting could not be answered because the incident is under investigation, according to Llewellyn.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 1, 2004
Two people were shot last night near an apartment complex in Columbia's Harper's Choice village and were flown by helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, authorities said. Conditions of the victims and details of the incident were not available. About 10:15 p.m., county police and fire department medics responding to a reported shooting at the Harpers Forest Apartments on Turnabout Lane found the victims bleeding from gunshot wounds. A state police helicopter from Norwood in Montgomery County arrived within minutes to transport the victims, authorities said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
Antwon Ash, power-suited and bright-eyed, set up behind a table before the start of a job fair yesterday and prepared to talk career opportunities. Except he was looking, not offering. Frederick County is trying a role reversal as it brings employers and would-be employees together: Recruiters are the ones walking from booth to booth, instead of waiting for people to come to them. Job fairs, like want ads, are a long-standing tradition and they're largely the same wherever you go. But here and there, organizers are putting new spins on the ritual: job-seekers giving speeches, bringing in displays, logging onto the Web for a virtual experience.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2003
The summer that Barry Williams took over at Southern High School, firefighters arriving to investigate smoke in a classroom tried to reassure the new principal in a back-handed way -- and prepare him for the worst. "Don't worry about it," they told him, with a friendly pat on the back. "You'll see a lot of us." Williams had been there less than a month, having been assigned by Baltimore school officials to fix a school that was badly bruised and nearly broken. The task was daunting enough, and the firefighters' warnings didn't help.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and Bill Atkinson and June Arney and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2003
Under mounting pressure, Baltimore's convention and visitors bureau said yesterday that it will release to the public a consultant's report that roundly criticized its operations as ineffective and called its management weak. After first promising to release the report, executives of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association reneged, and for weeks have refused to release the document. As criticism grew, BACVA released a 15-page summary of the report on Feb. 21. But that did not quell demands for full disclosure.
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