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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 21, 2007
If you've driven by Oakland Mills High School in the early morning or evening, you might have noticed strobe lights flashing from the roof. The lights are a way to repel about 100 turkey vultures that roost on the roof and rip away patches of material in the process. The vultures started showing up in November, and school officials are illuminating the strobe lights every day from 5 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. and from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Maintenance workers are exploring the use of reflectors to repel the birds.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 21, 2007
If you've driven by Oakland Mills High School in the early morning or evening, you might have noticed strobe lights flashing from the roof. The lights are a way to repel about 100 turkey vultures that roost on the roof and rip away patches of material in the process. The vultures started showing up in November, and school officials are illuminating the strobe lights every day from 5 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. and from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Maintenance workers are exploring the use of reflectors to repel the birds.
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NEWS
December 19, 1993
Nature is fighting back. At least, large animals are. Humans have gobbled so much habitat in North America that species formerly driven away are learning to adapt and are re-invading human domain. Many people who worship nature in the abstract find it discomfiting on close examination.This is much more than the raccoons flourishing in Baltimore City storm drains and red foxes in wooded parks. And the deer invading suburbia to the horror of gardeners. And the bear that traversed Baltimore County on a bee line for the Inner Harbor until barred by the Beltway.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
In the late afternoon sun, dozens of ominous, dark-winged birds soar over the quiet Gables at Columbia community in Long Reach village. They perch on the evergreens, land on roofs and chimneys, swoop down on a rotting tree by a nearby pond. The vultures of Howard County are back - and residents from Columbia to Glenwood are fed up. "The other day, I was out here, it was like a tornado and black funnel of them," said Margaret Dymond who lives near the Gables, one of several neighborhoods in the county coping with the noise and mess of the flying scavengers.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
LINGANORE -- While hanging Christmas lights on his deck the other day, Nick Hylton turned and caught a glimpse of the beach across from his contemporary, two-story home on Lake Linganore. Where he usually sees an empty, sandy stretch, he saw black. Lots of black.The vultures were back.About 200 turkey vultures (and probably some cousins) on this particular morning. Thigh-high. Some stretching 6-foot-wide wings.Standing.Silent.All staring with those penetrating eyes protruding from blood-red, bald, crinkly-skinned heads similar to those of turkeys.
NEWS
By Catherine Dold and Catherine Dold,New York Times News Service | March 29, 1992
LORIDA, Fla. -- Turkey vultures circled overhead as Lou Toth pointed his boat up the Kissimmee River, or C-38 as it has been known since the Army Corps of Engineers turned it into a poker-straight canal 20 years ago."Turkey vultures are not normally found in a wetlands ecosystem," he said. "This river might not look so bad, but biologically it is very degraded."Originally the Kissimmee meandered among 43,000 acres of wetlands, said Mr. Toth, a senior environmental scientist with the South Florida Water Management District.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
In the late afternoon sun, dozens of ominous, dark-winged birds soar over the quiet Gables at Columbia community in Long Reach village. They perch on the evergreens, land on roofs and chimneys, swoop down on a rotting tree by a nearby pond. The vultures of Howard County are back - and residents from Columbia to Glenwood are fed up. "The other day, I was out here, it was like a tornado and black funnel of them," said Margaret Dymond who lives near the Gables, one of several neighborhoods in the county coping with the noise and mess of the flying scavengers.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
For almost half a century, an obscure street above Ellicott City hasplayed host every year to a rather gruesome gathering.Each winter, a band of gangly, red-headed creatures with a fancy for freshly killed animals swoops in and sets up housekeeping in the trees and on rooftops overlooking Sylvan Lane, a winding street that traces the rimof the Ellicott City gorge west of the Patapsco River.They are turkey vultures -- buzzards, to some. And for five months of the year this symbol of death, stuff of horror films and staple of Loony Toons helps greet the day for the dozen or so families who live along the charming, narrow road.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
DREHERSVILLE, PA. -- Where on these corduroy mountains are the hawks of spring? Each autumn, thousands of raptors from 16 species soar over Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, one of the world's leading showcases for birds of prey. They use winds along the 300-mile-long Kittatinny Ridge as an escalator to ease their southward migration to Florida, Mexico and South America for the winter. Thousands of human birders enjoy the action. But not many hawks pass by on their spring flight north -- several dozen a day instead of hundreds.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 2002
THERE'S BEEN something of an avian mystery unfolding in Central County for the past few months. Residents have noticed that the usual winter birds - the jays, the cardinals, the wrens and the chickadees - have been joined by enormous birds roosting high in the treetops. It turns out that the giant black birds, visible in the leafless trees like great lumps of blackened bark, are nothing more than big, old buzzards. They are sometimes spotted in Central County in other seasons, but when they're roosting in trees with full leaves, they're virtually invisible.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 2002
THERE'S BEEN something of an avian mystery unfolding in Central County for the past few months. Residents have noticed that the usual winter birds - the jays, the cardinals, the wrens and the chickadees - have been joined by enormous birds roosting high in the treetops. It turns out that the giant black birds, visible in the leafless trees like great lumps of blackened bark, are nothing more than big, old buzzards. They are sometimes spotted in Central County in other seasons, but when they're roosting in trees with full leaves, they're virtually invisible.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
DREHERSVILLE, PA. -- Where on these corduroy mountains are the hawks of spring? Each autumn, thousands of raptors from 16 species soar over Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, one of the world's leading showcases for birds of prey. They use winds along the 300-mile-long Kittatinny Ridge as an escalator to ease their southward migration to Florida, Mexico and South America for the winter. Thousands of human birders enjoy the action. But not many hawks pass by on their spring flight north -- several dozen a day instead of hundreds.
NEWS
December 19, 1993
Nature is fighting back. At least, large animals are. Humans have gobbled so much habitat in North America that species formerly driven away are learning to adapt and are re-invading human domain. Many people who worship nature in the abstract find it discomfiting on close examination.This is much more than the raccoons flourishing in Baltimore City storm drains and red foxes in wooded parks. And the deer invading suburbia to the horror of gardeners. And the bear that traversed Baltimore County on a bee line for the Inner Harbor until barred by the Beltway.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
LINGANORE -- While hanging Christmas lights on his deck the other day, Nick Hylton turned and caught a glimpse of the beach across from his contemporary, two-story home on Lake Linganore. Where he usually sees an empty, sandy stretch, he saw black. Lots of black.The vultures were back.About 200 turkey vultures (and probably some cousins) on this particular morning. Thigh-high. Some stretching 6-foot-wide wings.Standing.Silent.All staring with those penetrating eyes protruding from blood-red, bald, crinkly-skinned heads similar to those of turkeys.
NEWS
By Catherine Dold and Catherine Dold,New York Times News Service | March 29, 1992
LORIDA, Fla. -- Turkey vultures circled overhead as Lou Toth pointed his boat up the Kissimmee River, or C-38 as it has been known since the Army Corps of Engineers turned it into a poker-straight canal 20 years ago."Turkey vultures are not normally found in a wetlands ecosystem," he said. "This river might not look so bad, but biologically it is very degraded."Originally the Kissimmee meandered among 43,000 acres of wetlands, said Mr. Toth, a senior environmental scientist with the South Florida Water Management District.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
For almost half a century, an obscure street above Ellicott City hasplayed host every year to a rather gruesome gathering.Each winter, a band of gangly, red-headed creatures with a fancy for freshly killed animals swoops in and sets up housekeeping in the trees and on rooftops overlooking Sylvan Lane, a winding street that traces the rimof the Ellicott City gorge west of the Patapsco River.They are turkey vultures -- buzzards, to some. And for five months of the year this symbol of death, stuff of horror films and staple of Loony Toons helps greet the day for the dozen or so families who live along the charming, narrow road.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
According to the memoirs of Samuel Mason, two types of squirrels had been known to live in Harford County at the end of the 1800s, the gray squirrel and the red squirrel. The last red squirrel Mason observed in the area was spotted July 22, 1944. Through research and investigation, Mason also noted the appearance of mockingbirds in the area, which were "rare in Harford County much before 1920," and Japanese honeysuckle, "which has deluged Harford's wood to their eventual devastation." Mason's observations of nature, published in 1955, also indicate that few deer and no beavers were present in the county earlier in the 20th century.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
BETTERTON -- Turners Creek is a long way from San Juan Capistrano, and the birds that have begun pecking on pickup trucks, foraging through garbage cans and roosting in the park pavilion near the Sassafras River will never be mistaken for swallows.Like uninvited guests crashing a family picnic, swarms of black vultures have taken up residence in the park in northern Kent County. Casting a pall over the waterfront site, the scavengers have ignored every effort to scare them off, including timed explosive blasts and loud whistles.
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