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NEWS
June 2, 2010
The coverage of the unfortunate incident in the seas near Gaza has focused thus far on whether Israel acted appropriately, with much international condemnation predictably alleging she did not. What is ignored in the typical focus on Israel as the aggressor in any conflict in that part of the world is whether Turkey was justified in what may turn our to be an at least unofficially sanctioned act of provocation. I have read several reports that speculate that Israel's action in enforcing its blockade of Gaza has endangered its relationship with its "closest" friend in the region.
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SPORTS
August 23, 2014
Turkey shoot Today , Aug. 24: The Baltimore County Game & Fish Protective Association will conduct a turkey shoot on club grounds at 3400 Northwind Road in Carney from noon to 3 p.m. Test your skill for a chance to win a turkey, ham or bacon. For further information, call Greg at 410-598-4970. Artificial reefs Monday, Aug. 25: Erik Zlokovitz of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources will discuss artificial reefs at the monthly meeting of the Perry Hall chapter of Maryland Saltwater Sportsfishing Association at 7:30 p.m. at Gunpowder VFW Post 10067 at 6309 Ebenezer Road.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 23, 1990
Here are some post-Thanksgiving Day leftovers of local lingo, Baltimore bits, Maryland memos and financial items from beyond the Beltway:LOCAL LINGO: "Devastation of small-capitalization stocks has been the broadest in recent history; from its high point the NASDAQ index is down more than 30 percent vs. S&P 500-index off 18 percent since midyear." (Smith Barney via Rick Faby) . . . "The most sobering current condition is that of the federal government. Historically, federal coffers were full when a slowdown arrived, cushioning bumps when entitlement payouts rose and tax revenues fell.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Gulay U. Lannon, a homemaker who enjoyed playing the piano and singing, died June 7 of cancer at her daughter's Rodgers Forge home. She was 75. The former Gulay Ulular was born and raised in Samsun, Turkey, where she graduated from a French-American high school. She met her future husband, Cormac Martin Lannon, while he was serving with the U.S. Air Force in Turkey. They were married in 1963 and later settled in Mount Washington. Her husband, a civil engineer who retired as head of construction management for the city Department of Public Works, died in 2009.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 8, 2010
To steal a theme from Ronald Reagan, "It is Thanksgiving again in America," and we are in for a miserable holiday. You know the kind of holiday I'm talking about. Where manners and tradition require you to break bread with people who irritate the living daylights out of you, including the two or three who can be counted on to do something so unpleasant as to make the day dreadfully memorable. The kind of holiday where divorces and remarriages and loans that never got paid back and thank-you notes that were never sent create a seething undercurrent that is as ready to bubble to the surface as the fat under the turkey's skin.
NEWS
December 1, 2013
President Obama will get a break from "Obamacare" when he pardons the traditional Thanksgiving turkey. Each of us can also set aside our cares by pardoning a turkey and choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance - one that gives thanks for our good fortune, health and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: •You will stay alert through the entire football game. •You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball?"
NEWS
January 20, 1991
Use of Turkish air bases allows U.S. bombers instant access to targets in northern Iraq from safe air space, without having to cross all of defended Iraq first. The Turkish parliament's granting of this right on the second day of the war helped the U.S. aerial campaign, and showed that Turkey has identified the winner and wishes to be found on the safe side.This action, pressed by President Turgut Ozal and opposed by the opposition on grounds of endangering the country, follows Turkey's closure of oil pipelines to Iraq in August.
NEWS
April 21, 1993
Few political leaders have had such a clear vision of their nation's place in a changing world as President Turgut Ozal of Turkey. It was no accident that his death of a heart attack Saturday, at age 66, came just after an arduous 12-day tour of five republics in Central Asia with Islamic populations and Soviet pasts. His death leaves a void for Turkey and the free world.Mr. Ozal came to the fore as a politician of the 1980s, the first elected prime minister after a military regime. He championed democracy, secularism and the free market.
NEWS
July 3, 1993
Turkey can kill the terrorist Kurdish Workers' Party (PKK) with firmness toward it and kindness toward Kurds. This it seemed to be doing when the late Turgut Ozal was president and increased Kurdish cultural rights in 1991, and when the PKK called a cease-fire last March. Several things happened. The popularity of PKK went down; Mr. Ozal died; Turkish security forces brutally attacked PKK suspects in southeastern Turkey. The PKK eruption in June is the delayed result.What motivates Abdullah Ocalan, the PKK leader operating from exile in Syria-controlled Lebanon, is unclear.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
SOME EXPRESSIONS of Islamic faith that would barely raise an eyebrow in the United States -- wearing a veil in a public building, for instance -- are illegal in Turkey. Adamantly secular since 1923, Turkey has fiercely clung to the image of itself as the modern exception in the Muslim world. Yet modernism has a way of growing old. Long after its big neighbor to the north abandoned the cult of Lenin, Turkey still adorns every office and every piece of money and every school building with the image of Mustafa Kemal, or Ataturk, the founding father who wore wing collars, outlawed the fez, drank raki with gusto -- and scorned what he saw as the irrationality of organized religion.
NEWS
By Kathleen J. Smith | May 1, 2014
Russia annexed Ukraine's southern Crimea region, despite the fact that a significant minority of the Crimean population are not ethnically Russian nor interested in joining the Russian Federation. Approximately 12 percent of the Crimean population - over 250,000 people - are ethnically "Tatar," a largely pro-Ukrainian, Sunni Muslim group. They have an embattled history with Russia. In 1944, Stalin exiled the Tatar population to Central Asia, and over half of the population died in the forced migration.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Two days after he was in New York to accept the NFL's Salute to Service Award, Ravens coach John Harbaugh embarked on another trip to honor the U.S. military. Harbaugh this week has joined Gen. Raymond Odierno, the Army chief of staff, on a trip to the Middle East to visit American troops in Turkey and Afghanistan. Since becoming the Ravens' coach, Harbaugh has developed a close relationship with Odierno, who has attended the team's practices and who presented Harbaugh with an Outstanding Civilian Service Award in 2012.
NEWS
December 1, 2013
President Obama will get a break from "Obamacare" when he pardons the traditional Thanksgiving turkey. Each of us can also set aside our cares by pardoning a turkey and choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance - one that gives thanks for our good fortune, health and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: •You will stay alert through the entire football game. •You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball?"
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Upon further review, Thursday's 94 th annual Turkey Bowl was not, the first overtime game in series history. It was at least the second. In 2000, the annual Thanksgiving Day classic went into two overtimes before Calvert Hall stopped a two-point conversion attempt to preserve a 7-6 win . The Sun regrets the error.
BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, Alison Knezevich, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Anna Szuba of Pasadena shopped on Thanksgiving last year -- two hours in line to get in the store and three hours in line to get out. No thanks, she said. This year she started around midnight Friday and worked through her gift list among much smaller crowds. Black Friday is drawing shoppers this year as always, but it's a far more sedate scene locally and nationally with the continuing rise of Thanksgiving sales. Szuba appreciates it. She went to three stores after finishing a late shift at work, and by 5:30 a.m. at Toys R Us in Glen Burnie, she was about done.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Nothing was going to stop Loyola's Jake Nordhausen from ending his team's four-year losing streak to archrival Calvert Hall in Thursday's 94th annual Turkey Bowl. Especially not the Cardinals' offensive line. In what's believed to be the second overtime game in series history, Nordhausen, a 6-foot-4 junior, broke through the line and dove forward to block Jake Soriano's extra-point attempt in overtime, sealing Loyola 21-20 win over the Cardinals before an announced 7,709 at Towson University's Johnny Unitas Stadium.
NEWS
By Oz Bengur | June 6, 2013
As the Arab Spring unfolded in Egypt and other countries in the Middle East, Turkey was held out as a model for how Islam and democracy could co-exist. This week's massive civil unrest in Turkey, erupting over the destruction of the Gezi Park in Istanbul's center, raises the broader question of whether that model is viable. The response to the protests has been harsh. Police liberally used tear gas and water hoses in a counterproductive attempt to quell the unrest. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan was dismissive of the protesters' demands and, showing his characteristic pugilism (he is a former boxer)
FEATURES
November 7, 1990
It's not too soon to call the turkey hotline. Butterball's Turkey Talk-Line is open now through late December. Call them at 1-800-323-4848.Their hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. On Thanksgiving they will be open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.The toll-free hotline available to callers nationwide who have questions about any and all turkey preparations -- from how to buy the bird to how to fix leftovers. Forty-four home economists and nutritionists are available to answer questions. This is the hotline's tenth year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Brickell, For The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
There's nothing wrong with slapping together some bread, mayo and turkey in the days following Thanksgiving . But eating what seems like an endless stream of cold sandwiches after the holiday can get a bit dull. So avoid getting stuck in the boring leftovers rut; these recipes from local chefs and food experts will make creative use of your post-Thanksgiving fixings. John Shields John Shields is a fixture at his restaurant, Gertrude's. But not on Thanksgiving - that's his time to relax and enjoy reconnecting with family.
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