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NEWS
November 11, 2004
On November 8, 2004, LEILA (nee Rutherford) TURK; beloved wife of the late Karl H. Turk Sr.; devoted mother of Karl Herbert Turk Jr., of Emmaus, PA, and Mariellen Schultz of Jasper, GA; dear grandmother of Debbie Rowson, Steve, Hope and Doug Schultz, and Michael and Laura Anne Turk. She is also survived by seven great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Margaret Johnson. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Thursday 4 to 6 P.M. Funeral Service will be held Friday 10:30 A.M. at First English Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3807 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD 21218.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2012
As an American of Turkic descent, I am outraged Gov. Rick Perry's response to Brett Baier's Turcophobic and twisted question about Turkey ("Turkey rejects Perry comments," Jan. 18). Gov. Perry made a disastrous mistake by saying that Turkey is governed by terrorists, that it shouldn't receive U.S. foreign aid and that its membership in NATO should be questioned. Turkey is the only country in the Middle East whose government is democratically elected by full participation of all of its citizens.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1996
Morris Turk, a retired Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge who was active in dozens of organizations, died Saturday night of apparent heart failure at his Annapolis home after being ill with cancer for several years. He was 75.Judge Turk was appointed to the bench in 1974 by then-Gov. Marvin Mandel and was elected in 1976 to a full 15-year term. He stepped down in July 1988, when his cancer was diagnosed, but continued in private practice and arbitration work."Morris did yeoman's service for the bench in this county," said Raymond G. Thieme Jr., administrative judge for the Fifth Circuit, which includes Anne Arundel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
Just like the inventor's assistant concealed inside a chess-playing robot, The Mechanical beats with a human heart and soul. But there are so many distracting gears and wheels involved in this world premiere at Theatre Project, so many hidden compartments with false bottoms, it can be difficult for the audience to penetrate to the living core. The MacArthur Award-winning Bond Street Theatre has a fascinating story to tell, a stunning visual theatrical vocabulary, and skilled performers to pull both off. The play, written and directed by Michael McGuigan, melds the familiar, fictitious story of Frankenstein's monster with the less well-known, but equally strange real-life story of a machine named "The Turk."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2000
K. Herbert Turk Sr., former president of Pemco Corp. in Baltimore, died Thursday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 94 and lived at the Brightwood Club Association retirement community in Lutherville. A Baltimore native, Mr. Turk was a graduate of Polytechnic Institute and studied at the Johns Hopkins University before joining the firm founded by his father, Karl Turk Sr., and uncle Heinrich Turk. Pemco makes glazes and industrial coatings. One of Pemco's creations was frit -- a custom-made glass powder used in porcelain, enamel and ceramic glazes that could be fused to steel at high temperatures.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | May 7, 2003
Bob Turk is a nice guy. A very nice guy. Everybody says so. "I can't even remember what he reports -- he's just part of the fiber of the city," says Maggie Miceli, 30, a native Baltimorean who currently lives in Washington. "He's been on television as long as I've been alive." Chris Godwin, a 23-year-old security guard from Baltimore, describes Turk this way: "He's just a typical person like you or I." You don't have to take their word for it. Executives at several local stations say surveys consistently show the cheerful Turk -- WJZ's weather forecaster for the past 30 years -- among the most popular people on the city's airwaves.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
ASHBURN, Va. -- It became the day of accountability.Less than 24 hours after the Washington Redskins failed to hold a three-touchdown lead against their chief rival in their home stadium, they tried to explain the plays that finalized a 41-35 overtime loss to the Dallas Cowboys in what many are referring to as The Meltdown.With Dallas facing a third-and-two on its 24-yard line, the Redskins played a two-deep zone, thinking the Cowboys would run. Backup safety Matt Stevens then bought into Dallas' play-action fake to Emmitt Smith by taking a couple of steps toward the line of scrimmage.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1999
ASHBURN, Va. -- The Washington Redskins have to avoid a trap today, and it has nothing to do with their opponent, the Chicago Bears.After suffering their second loss of the season last week against Dallas, the Redskins (4-2) have a locker room in disarray, with closed-door meetings and "Fingergate," an internal investigation into how punter Matt Turk broke his left middle finger.So the major question is not whether the Redskins can stop the Bears' running game today in Landover, but whether they can block out all the controversy.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | November 13, 2007
A woman stands holding up two loaves of Turkish bread. A little girl in a hot pink headscarf and yellow jeweled top smiles broadly. And a wall hanging of Mecca and Medina flashes on the screen as 14-year-old Myra Illysova explains, "It's a symbol of Muslims. Every Muslim house has one." The pictures provide glimpses of the lives of these Meskhetian Turk refugees from Russia, now high school students who belong to Baltimore City Community College's Refugee Youth Project. For the past four days, the 20 students have documented their lives and resettlement as part of a photo camp run by National Geographic, one of 10 camps across the world this year that focused on young refugee populations.
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | February 12, 1992
Like most articles of fashion, the union suit -- you do remember the union suit, don't you? -- has undergone an evolution over the decades:The union suit of the 1880s, when it was invented, was a one-piece men's or boys' underwear made by uniting the undershirt to the drawers. Sleeves and legs could be long or short. It was basic underwear, complete with drop seat.By 1940, the union had been divided and conquered by separate undershirts and boxer shorts, and it joined the endangered list.
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 2008
GRACE BAY, Turks and Caicos -- Legendary rocker Keith Richards was out of uniform. No dangling cigarette, no wailing guitar, no stormy look. As a matter of fact, he was grinning. And scratching the tummy of a shaggy black munchkin of a dog. It was late January, and the Rolling Stones member was chilling on a dock overlooking the turquoise waters surrounding Parrot Cay, a Caribbean islet that bills itself as "the world's most exclusive resort." The 1,000-acre private island is in Turks and Caicos, a semi-obscure archipelago east of Cuba that has been propelled into the limelight by its rising popularity with the glitterati.
NEWS
By Asso Ahmed and Alexandra Zavis and Asso Ahmed and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | March 6, 2008
SULAYMANIYA, Iraq -- Turkey unleashed air and artillery strikes against Kurdish guerrillas in northern Iraq yesterday, officials here said, five days after the Turks completed a major ground offensive in the mountainous border region. Turkey declared at the time that it had achieved its goal of denying the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, a free hand to attack its territory from sanctuaries in Iraq's semi-autonomous Kurdish region. But U.S. and Turkish military analysts were skeptical that the operation would have more than a temporary effect.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, speaking shortly after Turkey sent about 300 troops across the border in pursuit of Kurdish separatist guerrillas, cautioned yesterday against any action that could destabilize Iraq. Turkey's one-day incursion began hours before Rice arrived in Kirkuk in the latest attempt to revive Iraq's stalled reconciliation process after a sharp downturn in violence. U.S. officials have reported a 60 percent drop in attacks nationwide since the completion of a 28,500-troop buildup in June.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | November 13, 2007
A woman stands holding up two loaves of Turkish bread. A little girl in a hot pink headscarf and yellow jeweled top smiles broadly. And a wall hanging of Mecca and Medina flashes on the screen as 14-year-old Myra Illysova explains, "It's a symbol of Muslims. Every Muslim house has one." The pictures provide glimpses of the lives of these Meskhetian Turk refugees from Russia, now high school students who belong to Baltimore City Community College's Refugee Youth Project. For the past four days, the 20 students have documented their lives and resettlement as part of a photo camp run by National Geographic, one of 10 camps across the world this year that focused on young refugee populations.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2007
ISTANBUL, TURKEY -- The Turkish government is coming under enormous domestic pressure to crush Kurdish rebels in northern Iraq, but even as they shell rebel positions and move tens of thousands of troops to the border, leaders are reluctant to invade because of the international isolation and military quagmire likely to follow. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan would prefer to avoid a full-scale invasion, according to people familiar with his thinking, and is pursuing diplomatic options.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 22, 2007
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- A brazen ambush by Kurdish militants that left at least 12 Turkish soldiers dead touched off a major escalation in Turkey-Iraq tensions yesterday, bringing fears that Turkey would retaliate immediately by sending troops across the border into Iraq. But Turkey's prime minister said he delayed a decision after Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice personally intervened. The ambush by a large group of Kurdish militants about three miles from the border with Iraq early yesterday was seen as a direct provocation on the part of the militants, who have increasingly staged raids into Turkey from hideouts in the mountains of northern Iraq.
NEWS
May 18, 2005
On May 16, 2005, JOHN WILLIAM EVANS, age 93, of Baltimore, MD, beloved husband of M. Dorothy Evans (nee Hart), devoted father of Nancy E. Turk and her husband Wilfred and Rosemarie E. Kaufman and her husband David, loving grandfather of Brian L. Turk and his wife Emily, Kathleen A. Turk, Kevin M. Turk, Brent D. Kaufman and Todd E. Kaufman, cherished brother of Melvin Evans and brother-in-law of John W. Hart. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD on Wednesday, May 18, 2005 from 2 to 4 and from 6 P.M. until time of Masonic service at 8 P.M. and on Thursday, May 19 from 10 A.M. until time of funeral service at 11 A.M. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The TV soap opera "L.A. Law" is rarely as explosive as the courtroom mini-series that was played out for real here this week, when a feisty diet doctor defended himself against charges that he failed to keep adequate records of addictive pills.During a two-day civil trial in U.S. District Court, Dr. Ellis Turk called his only witness a liar, argued vociferously with a normally mild judge and objected to nearly every question posed by his opposing counsel.There were accusations of conspiracy amid much finger-pointing, name-calling and gavel-banging.
NEWS
By Christian Berthelsen and Christian Berthelsen,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The Iraqi parliament began debate yesterday on a resolution condemning Turkey for its recent decision to authorize strikes against Kurdish rebels inside Iraq, as an estimated 15,000 Kurds from a village on the border between the two countries protested the Turkish move. Debate on the measure, which will urge Iraq's northern neighbor to rely on peaceful means to resolve disputes, is likely to last several days. Several party leaders in parliament voiced support for such a resolution, but some said the wording must be tempered also to condemn attacks by the Kurdish rebels and voice understanding for Turkey's position.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A House committee voted yesterday to condemn the mass killings of Armenians in Turkey in World War I as an act of genocide, rebuffing an intense campaign by the White House and warnings from Turkey's government that the vote would gravely strain relations with the United States. The vote by the House Foreign Relations Committee was nonbinding and so largely symbolic, but its consequences could reach far beyond bilateral relations and spill into the war in Iraq. Turkish officials and lawmakers warned that if the resolution is approved by the full House, they would reconsider supporting the American war effort, which includes permission to ship essential supplies through Turkey and northern Iraq.
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