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By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
A Federal Hill woman seeking to become the first Baltimore resident with a wind turbine on her roof failed to win approval from city officials yesterday. The effort by Marsha Vitow brought opposition from neighbors concerned about safety and aesthetics and confounded city officials, who work for a mayor with a "cleaner, greener" agenda but had to deal with the city codes now on the books. Vitow needed a variance to build above the 35-foot residential height limit but the law didn't allow for wind turbines.
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NEWS
April 28, 2014
As the former director of the Atlantic Test Ranges at Patuxent River, Maryland I have been reading with interest the various articles related to the effects of wind turbines on instrumentation radar systems located at this facility. I am a recognized national expert on test range operations with over 40 years of experience in this field. I would like to let the public know that wind turbine development on the Eastern Shore is a real encroachment threat to sensitive test measurements performed by the Navy at Patuxent River.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | October 3, 2009
Light breezes and low elevations make Baltimore County uninviting territory for big wind farms, but the terrain could be more promising for residents hoping to trim electric bills and their "carbon footprint" with a home turbine. The outlook could hinge on deliberations going on now, as the county revises the zoning code to cover such projects. Meanwhile, one homeowner's plan for the county's first electricity-generating wind turbine remains on hold as neighbors who say they support alternative energy have lined up against it. "We know this is coming," said Barry Antonelli, who has permission to put up a 120-foot turbine on his 97-acre farm in the Phoenix area, but is awaiting resolution of his neighbors' appeal, which in turn depends on how the new regulations take shape.
NEWS
By Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat | April 21, 2014
There is no doubt that national security is of paramount importance. But what if Maryland can protect one of its crown jewel military assets, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station, while also boosting domestic energy security and taking advantage of the economic development wind energy provides in an area in need of good jobs and investment? Such win-win opportunities are available. Unfortunately House Bill 1168, currently sitting on Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk, stands in the way by unnecessarily impeding private investment in wind energy in Maryland.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | August 4, 2009
Looking to offset rising electricity bills, Marsha Vitow has a modern solution: installing Baltimore's first residential wind turbine on the roof of her Federal Hill rowhouse. It's a logical move in a city whose mayor has pushed extra tree plantings, recycling and other issues on a "cleaner, greener" agenda, but Vitow has run into some old-fashioned problems. Decades-old zoning laws don't account for a wind turbine, and some of her neighbors say the eight-foot-tall contraption will hurt their rooftop views and their property values.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2003
It wasn't necessarily the old green generator in Wilson's Mill that sparked Henry Holloway's attraction to the 18th-century property on Deer Creek and Route 161 in Harford County, but the idea of creating his own electricity there is firing his imagination these days. The old grist mill, which local historians think was built in the mid-1700s, was outfitted with a water-powered turbine decades ago by a former owner to generate electricity for the farm. But by June 2000, when Holloway - a seventh-generation Harford County farmer and an owner of several farm-supply stores - bought the property, the equipment had been silent for years.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | November 29, 1994
The Aerospace division of AlliedSignal Inc. announced yesterday that it will eliminate 1,000 jobs over the next eight months at the former Textron Lycoming engine plant in Stratford, Conn.AlliedSignal acquired Textron Lycoming, the turbine engine division of Providence, R.I.-based Textron Inc., last month. At that time it said the purchase would result in job cuts as it combined the business with its Phoenix, Ariz.-based engines unit.The job cuts, due to begin in December, will leave about 1,200 employees at the Stratford plant.
NEWS
By Ruth Goldstein | August 6, 2009
Now that Baltimore City has had its first wind turbine zoning case, it's time for metropolitan Baltimore to get serious about a regional advisory panel on renewable energy resources. Baltimore County has been grappling with this issue since last year, when a farmer in Phoenix wanted to erect a 120-foot windmill on his 97-acre property - far larger than the 8-foot turbine a city zoning panel rejected for a rowhouse rooftop in Federal Hill. In the county, which, like Baltimore, had no regulations to provide guidance, the zoning commissioner granted the request.
NEWS
By Sierra Gladfelter | April 14, 2013
After protesting at a nearby coal plant in 2008 and becoming discouraged with his own dependence on unsustainable energy, Charles County Commissioner Ken Robinson decided to build a wind generator on his coastal property and get off the grid. He became the first individual in Southern Maryland to build one on his land. After Mr. Robinson made the rounds to neighbors, the community embraced his idea. "Only slightly taller than a flag pole," the 33-foot turbine produces 30 percent to 40 percent of Mr. Robinson's power.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
The Bel Air Board of Commissioners unanimously passed the revised Route 24 Overlay District plan last Monday evening.The plan is a set of guidelines that commercial developers must follow when building between MacPhail Road and the northern boundary of the town just beyond Harford Mall. Revisions were made in several areas, including setback requirements -- the distance a building must be from the road -- parking restrictions and sign sizes.Existing buildings in the district are not affected by the plan.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a naval air station in Southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River. The House voted 114-11 later Saturday to give the measure final approval. Assembly action sends the bill to O'Malley — who opposes it and has not said if he will sign it into law. Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore wind project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, an economic engine for the region.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The Senate moved Saturday to curtail commercial wind turbines across much of the state to protect a prized naval air station in southern Maryland, brushing aside arguments the curb would kill a $200 million energy project on the Eastern Shore. By a vote of 31-16, senators approved a 13-month moratorium on tall turbines within 56 miles of Naval Air Station Patuxent River.  Supporters said they feared a proposed Eastern Shore project could lead to cutbacks in operations at the base, the region's economic engine.  They argued a delay was needed to finish a study of whether such projects could operate without interfering with the station's radar.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2014
Opponents of a Somerset County wind energy facility pushed forward with a House proposal to slow the project Saturday, a victory for Southern Maryland over the Eastern Shore in a rare contest of rural regions. On a 40-80 vote, the House defeated an amendment that would have weakened a bill to impose a 15-month delay on the construction of high turbines for the Eastern Shore project. Lawmakers from Southern Maryland -- across the Chesapeake Bay -- are concerned about how the wind facility would affect Patuxent Naval Air Station,  one of the state's largest military bases and the economic engine of that region.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
The General Assembly should not approve any bills that allow wind turbines or solar panels on agricultural lands that are under restrictive easements purchased from farmers by the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation, MALPF ( "Bills would allow wind, solar projects on protected farmland," March 6). The easements preserve the use of the land for agriculture and forestry, and commercial development is prohibited. Any commercial use must be related to the production of agricultural or forestry products.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Federal wildlife officials announced Monday they have approved measures taken at Maryland's first industrial wind energy project to reduce the risk of spinning turbine blades killing endangered bats and birds. Exelon Generation, which owns and operates the 28-turbine Criterion wind project built in 2010 in Garrett County, has pledged to "feather" or reduce the rotation speed of its turbines' blades during nighttime from late summer to early fall, peak bat migration time. The company also has agreed to install a protective gate over a bat cave in a neighboring state as mitigation for its turbines possibly killing one or more Indiana bats.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
A wind-energy project in Western Maryland has been given more time by state regulators to start construction - the second deadline extension for the proposed 25-turbine development on Dan's Mountain in Allegany County. The state Public Service Commission this week approved Dan's Mountain Wind Force LLC's request to push the deadline to begin construction from next week to Dec. 31, 2014. The deadline had earlier been moved to Sept. 12 of this year from March 2012. Dan's Mountain Wind Force didn't ask for an extension of the September 2015 deadline to have at least one wind turbine complete.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | June 5, 1991
Billed as the cleanest and most economical of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s power plants, Brandon Shore's new 642-megawatt electric generator is anything but quiet.The rumbling hum of the massive General Electric turbine -- powered by 250 tons of coal an hour -- easily penetrates the foam rubber earplugs BG&E officials require guests to wear.Yesterday, the utility opened the doors of Brandon Shores Unit II, which it switched on May 28, to reporters and photographers.Theturbine deck is spotless and the containment room is cool, especially considering that the steam which drives the turbine reaches 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 24, 2013
Maryland's bid to put wind turbines off Ocean City is setting sail. The Scarlett Isabella, a 130-foot vessel outfitted with sophisticated sonar and seismic gear, is scheduled to shove off from West Ocean City Monday night to begin surveying the Atlantic sea floor 10 to 30 miles off the Maryland coast. The ship's 30- to 40-day voyage is being underwritten by the state of Maryland. Earlier this year, the state Board of Public Works gave a $3.3 million contract to Coastal Planning & Engineering, a Florida-based marine engineering firm, to conduct a geophysical survey of the "wind energy area" designated off the state's coast by the U.S. Interior Department.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
A wind power project proposed on the lower Eastern Shore that's struggling to overcome objections from the Navy has a new, airborne worry - bald eagles. Federal wildlife biologists say the population of the once-rare national bird has grown so much that there are about 400 bald eagles along the mid-Atlantic coast, including 30 nests within 10 miles of the project in Somerset County, and three in the immediate vicinity. Declaring the area "extremely attractive" to the birds, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has warned the developer of the Great Bay wind project that it "appears to present significant risk to eagles" and urged it to scale back its plans.
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