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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1994
It comes in so many forms in so many countries that you can even get one to brew beer in. Its home-party sales method, so often mocked, turns out to be a convenient answer to crowded commutes to shops in Japan and a way around some cultures' mores about women working outside the home. And after a tough recession, the company that makes it is back.It's Tupperware, a $1.2 billion component of Premark International Inc., an Illinois conglomerate with $3.1 billion in 1993 annual sales. And Premark's chairman and chief executive, Warren L. Batts, in town this week to address a Legg Mason Inc. conference on value investing, said the company is looking strong after a tough 1992 restructuring.
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NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 27, 2008
Every day, I thank my lucky stars for the luxurious modern conveniences I enjoy that my parents never had: disposable baby wipes, cell phones, drive-through coffee shops, salad in a bag and curiously strong breath mints. But every once in a while, I am reminded of that old French phrase: Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose. Roughly translated, this means: "You will never find a plastic top that fits the container you choose to store leftovers in." My mother used to have Tupperware, and I remember it being a challenge when I was a child to find the matching top for a given container.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Feigenbaum and Nancy Feigenbaum,Orlando Sentinel | March 22, 1992
Morison Cousins keeps a collection of ordinary things on his shelf at Tupperware Worldwide Headquarters in Kissimmee, Fla. There are two plastic sugar bowls, several cameras, a water pitcher and a few napkin holders, plus whatever else he has recently picked up.To Mr. Cousins, none of it is ordinary. He picks up the white water pitcher and traces the lip with his finger, showing curves that weren't obvious. The pitcher suddenly looks extravagant."Beautiful lines," Mr. Cousins said, admiring his find.
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 17, 2005
Yes, you deserve an early Christmas present. And, yes, we mean you - the one who gets stuck watering old tannenbaum every year. On your hands and knees. Dodging boughs. Smacking into ornaments. Heather Shepardson, a Colorado-based inventor and entrepreneur with a background in product development, came up with a fix from all that unpleasantness. It's called the Ever-Green Watering System. It's a device that sits under your Christmas tree, posing as a wrapped package and even sporting a pretty red bow. But inside the "package" is a reservoir (which feeds into a tube, which gets placed into your tree stand and works on gravity)
NEWS
By GREG MORAGO and GREG MORAGO,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 2, 2005
They didn't exactly appear comfortable. In fact, they looked like a nasty tumble waiting to happen. They were the Tupperware-inspired ballerina shoes worn at designer Cynthia Rowley's recent runway show during Fashion Week in New York. Uncomfortable? Dangerous? The same words could be used to describe Manolo Blahnik's stilettos and Jimmy Choo's skyscraper sandals. But what made Rowley's shoes so nifty, despite their appearance, was her unusual collaboration with Tupperware, not exactly a company one associates with designer chic.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
On a warm weeknight not too long ago, Kara Toner and Brian Waskiewicz threw their first party together. Though they've been dating for only six months, already there are clear divisions of labor. It was up to Toner, 29, a sales representative for Grainger, an industrial supply company, to clean up her Perry Hall apartment, haul in extra lawn chairs for seating, and set up the bar. Waskiewicz, 31, a pilot for Atlantic Coast Airlines, was the chef. "We have such a role reversal, it cracks me up," said Toner, a petite, freckle-faced blonde.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | December 19, 1993
New Tupperware bowls have ears.They're not Mickey ears, not even Dumbo ears, but graceful scallops placed on one side of the lids or both sides of the bowls. The new ears are bigger and gentler than Tupperware's old 1960s thumb-bruising tabs, and they even have a little extra texturing so a person can get a good burp out of the bowl or use them to tote potato salad from the counter to the refrigerator.Morison Cousins, Tupperware's director of design, doesn't call these whimsical tabs "ears," of course.
NEWS
November 23, 1992
WHY IS Tupperware only sold at parties? David Feldman's "Why Do Fish Sleep? and Other Imponderables of Everyday Life," explains part of this mystery.It all began in 1945, when Earl Tupper established Tupper Plastics. His first effort to market the product in stores failed because people were afraid that plastic would be too flimsy. Tupper was then approached by two demonstrators of Stanley Home Products, who convinced him they could sell his goods. Their work eventually led to the establishment of Tupperware Home parties in 1951.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 5, 1999
Better tap the Susquehanna before it's gone.Mad dogs and sunscreen wearers go out in the noonday sun.St. Paul Companies mean to layoff a thousand workers and if that doesn't sweeten the chairman's bonus, nothing will.You can't have a minyan without a permit in Baltimore County? How about a baby shower, candidate's coffee or Tupperware party?Pub Date: 8/05/99
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | September 20, 2000
Lunch-time fun There's no guarantee your kids will eat the sandwiches you pack for lunch, but with Tupperware's new Pokemon sandwich keepers, maybe they at least will take a look. The package of 12 yellow and blue containers features favorite Pokemon characters and retails for $15. They are available from Tupperware distributors or through the company's Web site at www.tupperware.com. Chicken in their pots Americans are expected to eat 82 pounds of chicken this year, according to a survey for the National Chicken Council.
NEWS
By GREG MORAGO and GREG MORAGO,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 2, 2005
They didn't exactly appear comfortable. In fact, they looked like a nasty tumble waiting to happen. They were the Tupperware-inspired ballerina shoes worn at designer Cynthia Rowley's recent runway show during Fashion Week in New York. Uncomfortable? Dangerous? The same words could be used to describe Manolo Blahnik's stilettos and Jimmy Choo's skyscraper sandals. But what made Rowley's shoes so nifty, despite their appearance, was her unusual collaboration with Tupperware, not exactly a company one associates with designer chic.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 2004
The Vagabond Players' new season focuses primarily on modern American masters, from Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams to Lerner and Loewe. But as its season opener, the theater has taken a risk on a relative newcomer - a cartoonist/screenwriter/playwright named Doug Stone. It's not a risk that pays off. An account of a suburban Tupperware party in 1968, Stone's Sealed for Freshness is a pretty stale affair. The play begins with a housewife named Bonnie (Debra Tracey) being told by her husband (Steven Michael Kovalic)
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN FOOD EDITOR | August 25, 2004
Rare sips Veuve ClicquotM-Fs La Grande Dame 1996 will be released this fall in style M-y packaged in a box and label created by Italian designer Emilio Pucci. PucciM-Fs bold print was inspired by the curvaceous bottle and the celebratory yellow that identifies the House of Veuve Clicquot. The limited-edition Champagne will be available in fine wine shops nationwide for a suggested retail price of $200. Wake up to watermelon SummerM-Fs winding down, but donM-Ft be blue. Hold on to summer a little longer with easy watermelon recipes.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | November 9, 2003
"Save the leaves," I said to my husband on a recent Saturday morning. He looked up from the kitchen table and his newspaper, confused. "Save the leaves?" he asked, and I could tell by the way he put the question that he was trying to find out if I meant "save the leaves" as in "save the whales," or something else entirely. I meant something else entirely. "I want you to save all the leaves for me this fall," I continued. "I'm going to need them." It was a request a little out of the ordinary, I knew.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
On a warm weeknight not too long ago, Kara Toner and Brian Waskiewicz threw their first party together. Though they've been dating for only six months, already there are clear divisions of labor. It was up to Toner, 29, a sales representative for Grainger, an industrial supply company, to clean up her Perry Hall apartment, haul in extra lawn chairs for seating, and set up the bar. Waskiewicz, 31, a pilot for Atlantic Coast Airlines, was the chef. "We have such a role reversal, it cracks me up," said Toner, a petite, freckle-faced blonde.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | September 20, 2000
Lunch-time fun There's no guarantee your kids will eat the sandwiches you pack for lunch, but with Tupperware's new Pokemon sandwich keepers, maybe they at least will take a look. The package of 12 yellow and blue containers features favorite Pokemon characters and retails for $15. They are available from Tupperware distributors or through the company's Web site at www.tupperware.com. Chicken in their pots Americans are expected to eat 82 pounds of chicken this year, according to a survey for the National Chicken Council.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 27, 2008
Every day, I thank my lucky stars for the luxurious modern conveniences I enjoy that my parents never had: disposable baby wipes, cell phones, drive-through coffee shops, salad in a bag and curiously strong breath mints. But every once in a while, I am reminded of that old French phrase: Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose. Roughly translated, this means: "You will never find a plastic top that fits the container you choose to store leftovers in." My mother used to have Tupperware, and I remember it being a challenge when I was a child to find the matching top for a given container.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 5, 1999
Better tap the Susquehanna before it's gone.Mad dogs and sunscreen wearers go out in the noonday sun.St. Paul Companies mean to layoff a thousand workers and if that doesn't sweeten the chairman's bonus, nothing will.You can't have a minyan without a permit in Baltimore County? How about a baby shower, candidate's coffee or Tupperware party?Pub Date: 8/05/99
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