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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
In 1994, Baltimore's own Tupac Shakur was shot in a New York ambush and a decade later, the intrigue persists. The Village Voice earlier this month reported that a drug lord named James Rosemond, Jimmy Henchman on the street, long implicated in the crime, had admitted to it. The publication pointed to transcripts where Rosemond admitted to involvement in the rapper's ambush. Rosemond was talking with federal prosecutors under an agreement that the information wouldn't be used against him. Rosemond is already in jail on a drug conviction and won't be charged with the attack on Shakur.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
In 1994, Baltimore's own Tupac Shakur was shot in a New York ambush and a decade later, the intrigue persists. The Village Voice earlier this month reported that a drug lord named James Rosemond, Jimmy Henchman on the street, long implicated in the crime, had admitted to it. The publication pointed to transcripts where Rosemond admitted to involvement in the rapper's ambush. Rosemond was talking with federal prosecutors under an agreement that the information wouldn't be used against him. Rosemond is already in jail on a drug conviction and won't be charged with the attack on Shakur.
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NEWS
By Mike Adams | September 22, 1996
THE YEAR OF our Lord Nineteen Hundred and Fifty Seven. Cold War. Atomic jitters. Man has become Death, the destroyer of worlds and the squares are sipping champagne music from Lawrence Welk's accordion.Across the land, pulpits fulminate with warnings about communism, Armageddon and race music. The Beat Generation on the road with Jack Kerouac, exploring the Coney Island in Lawrence Ferlinghetti's mind and/or digging blue notes in smoke-filled clubs in New York and Frisco.It was the year that Norman Mailer wrote "The White Negro," an essay about black hipsters and their white imitators.
FEATURES
October 26, 2006
Lecture Remembering Tupac Shakur At 7:30 p.m. today, Afeni Shakur, mother of murdered rapper Tupac Shakur, will deliver a lecture titled "Remember Me: The Living Legacy of Tupac Shakur." The lecture is part of the Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium at the Johns Hopkins University and takes place at Shriver Hall, 3400 N. Charles St. It's free and open to the public, but seating is limited. For more in formation, go to www.jhu.edu/mse.
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By Esther Iverem and Esther Iverem,Newsday | August 6, 1993
Watch Tupac Shakur -- gangster rapper, son of a Black Panther, rage-filled young man -- break.Watch as his heart breaks in John Singleton's new film "Poetic Justice," in which he plays Lucky, a young postal carrier in South-Central Los Angeles. See the honest, good-hearted laborer who has no concern over his dirty fingernails. So &L emotionally vulnerable that he once fell for a hooker. Hanging by a thread so thin a cousin's death causes it to snap and his eyes to spill over with tears.Watch Tupac Shakur (pronounced Toopok Shakoor)
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
"Gang Related" isn't about heroes. It's about scumbags. It is a sticky spider-web of a movie that spins circles around its villains, so that every strand they break in trying to escape entangles them further.Director and writer Jim Kouf (who was responsible for the tepid "Operation Dumbo Drop," of all things) has created a nameless city like so many cities, bleak and broken, whose drug-infested heart is filled with despair. Worse, the leeches who feed off the bloodshed are cops.James Belushi plays the sociopath of the pair; late rapper Tupac Shakur is the morally malleable one. Together, they set up drug deals, take the money, whack the dealers, repossess the drugs and cynically dub the murder "gang-related" when they are asked to investigate.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Given the chance to reach more than 1,400 young people at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, organizers of the Youth Explosion 2004 leadership conference tried to impart as many positive messages as they could. Workshops focused on business skills, college preparation, spirituality, dating violence and hip-hop music. Speakers encouraged the almost completely African-American crowd to love, respect themselves, take care of and think for themselves. Keynote speaker Afeni Shakur, mother of slain rapper Tupac Shakur -- who attended the School for the Arts in Baltimore in the late '80s.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
In the mercurial world of pop, a young artist's tragic death intrigues us. We suddenly want to study every nuance of his art to figure out what made him so great. We evaluate (or magnify) various aspects of his life: his accomplishments, his relationships, what should have been, what could have been. Always thinking about that almighty dollar, record companies flood the market with collections of outtakes and remixes. Book publishers rush-release biographies and journals. Film studios search for scripts based on the life of ... Buddy Holly.
NEWS
September 21, 1996
THREE YEARS AGO, when muscular dystrophy was eating DTC away at 11-year-old Joshua Torres, the Havre de Grace boy made a deathbed wish -- to see the musician Tupac Shakur.His mother phoned a radio station in the hope it could help her reach the rap star. Not only did Mr. Shakur call back, he arrived by jet within hours to visit the family's residence on the Aberdeen Proving Ground army base.That was one face of Tupac Shakur, the former Baltimore School for the Arts student who rose to musical fame and "culture war" infamy before being gunned down last week in a case of life imitating angry art."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Neil Strauss and Neil Strauss,NEW YORK TIMES | April 15, 2001
NEW YORK -- On a recent Monday afternoon, Adam Gassman, 14, stood amid a gaggle of teenybopper girls outside MTV's Times Square studios, as he does almost every day after school. While the schoolgirls begged producers to let them into the studio for the day's taping of "Total Request Live," Adam looked on dour-faced. In his hand was a large white sign with two words sloppily scrawled in thin black marker: "Tupac lives." At the same time in the East Village, at the New York Theater Workshop, tickets were on sale for "Up Against the Wind," a play about Tupac Shakur's life and 1996 death in a drive-by shooting.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Pasadena boy, 8, dies after being struck by an SUV An 8-year-old Pasadena boy, who rode his bike up to his aunt's stopped sport utility vehicle to talk to his cousin inside, died after being struck by the SUV, Anne Arundel County police said yesterday. Edgar Hernandez-Guzman suffered internal injuries when he was run over about 3:40 p.m. Monday by the Lincoln Navigator driven by Rosalba Ortiz De Guzman, also of Pasadena, police said. De Guzman was stopped near Summit Avenue and Chain Hills Road when Edgar approached along the driver's side.
FEATURES
November 17, 2005
The too-short life of rapper Tupac Shakur (above) is retold in Tupac: Resurrection (10:05 p.m.-midnight, TMC).
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2005
The tale of how Maryland artist John Ashford conned his way onto a Warner Bros. lot and sold his paintings as backdrops for the sitcom Martin is great storytelling, but to hear it yesterday you had to linger among the vendors at the Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival. At this weekend's 18th annual celebration of African ancestry, entertainment wasn't limited to hip-hop, jazz, gospel and rhythm and blues. In the suffocating heat of the vendors' tents were the colorful nuances of a culture as diverse as its native continent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Jurgensen and John Jurgensen,HARTFORD COURANT | December 12, 2004
Despite lingering rumors to the contrary, it's safe to say that Tupac Shakur is dead. So why does he keep putting out records? The rapper's latest posthumous release, Loyal to the Game, shows up in stores this week in time for the holidays. It's the seventh 2Pac record (not including greatest-hits and remix collections) to emerge since he was shot down in Las Vegas eight years ago. Shakur's output in death can be explained by how prolific he was in life. The man who helped canonize the West Coast gangsta sound committed loads of unreleased material to tape before his unsolved murder.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Given the chance to reach more than 1,400 young people at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, organizers of the Youth Explosion 2004 leadership conference tried to impart as many positive messages as they could. Workshops focused on business skills, college preparation, spirituality, dating violence and hip-hop music. Speakers encouraged the almost completely African-American crowd to love, respect themselves, take care of and think for themselves. Keynote speaker Afeni Shakur, mother of slain rapper Tupac Shakur -- who attended the School for the Arts in Baltimore in the late '80s.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
In the mercurial world of pop, a young artist's tragic death intrigues us. We suddenly want to study every nuance of his art to figure out what made him so great. We evaluate (or magnify) various aspects of his life: his accomplishments, his relationships, what should have been, what could have been. Always thinking about that almighty dollar, record companies flood the market with collections of outtakes and remixes. Book publishers rush-release biographies and journals. Film studios search for scripts based on the life of ... Buddy Holly.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 24, 1998
It's easy to be cynical about the ways in which an untimely demise can alter an artist's reputation. "Death is a great career move," is an old recording industry joke, but it's true -- many mediocre musicians have earned lasting fame merely by virtue of having died too young.Hip-hop has been particularly vulnerable to the gone-too-soon syndrome. After the violent and unexpected deaths of Tupac Shakur (after a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas in 1996) and Notorious B.I.G. (after a drive-by in Los Angeles the following year)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 6, 1996
It looks as if Tupac Shakur is going to be haunting the music world for some time. Just before he died of gunshot wounds sustained during a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas Sept. 7, he had finished work on a new project that he planned to release in an "underground" fashion -- that is, with no hype, no publicity and no mention of his rap moniker, 2Pac. Instead, the album would go out under an alias: Makaveli.Well, the alias part went as planned. But given the circumstances, it's understandable that there was something more than an underground buzz preceding the release yesterday of "The Don Killuminati" (Death Row/Interscope 90039)
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By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2002
HOLLYWOOD - The party at the Playboy Mansion was over hours earlier, and as the clock ticked toward 4 a.m., Marion "Suge" Knight was back in his darkened office and puffing on a Cuban cigar. Over his shoulder, the framed platinum albums glinted like chrome rims in a low fog. It was then, as happens with the rap music mogul, that the topic turned to murder. "I'm a product of the inner city, and if you're from off the block, more than likely, you're going to go in a violent way or spend your life in prison," he said in a near whisper.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2002
A glimpse of Baltimore's Pennsylvania Avenue in another day: James Brown throwing off his cape at the storied Royal Theater, and Miles Davis blowing his trumpet amid the glitz and bright lights that once made the auditorium a mecca for jazz and blues. The character of the neighborhood around the now-defunct Royal Theater isn't so sparkly now, having been sullied by crime and drugs since the club closed in 1970. But Maryland Institute College of Art students are doing their part to illustrate what they hope will be a new page of city history on Pennsylvania Avenue.
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