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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
The violent end to Peru's long hostage crisis leaves the guerrilla group that carried out the siege, the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, with most of its members either dead or in jail.For the Tupac Amaru, Peru's second-largest rebel group, the seizing of the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima was from the start a last-ditch gamble.With 400 members, including its top leaders, in jail, the rebels had carried out only a handful of actions in 1996, apparently saving themselves up through the year for this one spectacular push.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Neil Strauss and Neil Strauss,NEW YORK TIMES | April 15, 2001
NEW YORK -- On a recent Monday afternoon, Adam Gassman, 14, stood amid a gaggle of teenybopper girls outside MTV's Times Square studios, as he does almost every day after school. While the schoolgirls begged producers to let them into the studio for the day's taping of "Total Request Live," Adam looked on dour-faced. In his hand was a large white sign with two words sloppily scrawled in thin black marker: "Tupac lives." At the same time in the East Village, at the New York Theater Workshop, tickets were on sale for "Up Against the Wind," a play about Tupac Shakur's life and 1996 death in a drive-by shooting.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- Leftist guerrillas holding 74 Peruvian and foreign officials hostage unfurled banners on the roof of the residence of the Japanese ambassador yesterday, calling on the Peruvian government to resume talks to resolve the 18-day standoff."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- The daring rescue of 71 hostages at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima last week brought a victorious end to one of Peru's worst terrorist attacks since guerrilla groups first took up arms against the government two decades ago.But the rebels, who occupied the residence for four months until commandos killed them in a surprise raid, demonstrated that despite years of aggressive counterinsurgency efforts, Peru is still far from conquering...
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
On Jan. 11, a 27-year-old American citizen named Lori Berenson began her second year in a prison cell in Peru that could be described as a dungeon. The prison sits 12,000 feet high in the Peruvian Andes and so many worlds away from where she grew up that her family and friends can't exactly say how she got there.Berenson, the daughter of two college professors, grew up near Grammercy Park in Manhattan. Her teachers at LaGuardia High School, where she was a straight-A student, say she stared at the floor and mumbled when talking to people.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
TUPAC AMARU, the last Inca, rebelled against his Spanish captors and was beheaded in 1572. Two centuries later, an Indian who ignited rebellion in the Andes took the name Tupac Amaru II, before his own execution. Two centuries later, in 1984, middle-class Peruvian Marxists inspired by Fidel Castro in Cuba formed the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA). The name connoted undying rebellion and lost causes.No one noticed. A larger, more murderous, mad Maoist movement called Shining Path was destroying the country.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 20, 1996
Tupac Amaru I in the 16th century and Tupac Amaru II in the 18th century were lost causes who caused mischief. It is fair to infer what Trey is about.Show no sympathy. The top FBI guy working for the Russians should have known a top KGB guy was helping our side.Mobutu Sese Seko heard of a part of Zaire he hadn't stolen and went back for it.So long, Ed-die, it was good to see you again.Pub Date: 12/20/96
NEWS
April 24, 1997
PRESIDENT ALBERTO FUJIMORI has earned the gratitude of law-abiding people everywhere -- not just in his own country -- for daring to use force to end a hostage-taking siege, the likes of which should not be tolerated by any government worthy of the name. His patience, his guile, his refusal to give in to the demands of terrorists culminated in a lightning strike that secured the freedom and saved the lives of 71 of 72 hostages held captive for four months at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- The daring rescue of 71 hostages at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima last week brought a victorious end to one of Peru's worst terrorist attacks since guerrilla groups first took up arms against the government two decades ago.But the rebels, who occupied the residence for four months until commandos killed them in a surprise raid, demonstrated that despite years of aggressive counterinsurgency efforts, Peru is still far from conquering...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- Peruvian officials, signaling a reopening of negotiations, have renewed contacts with leftist guerrillas holding 74 hostages, establishing what President Alberto Fujimori described as a radio bridge to the rebels.The government is also approaching countries that could provide asylum to the rebels once they release the hostages they captured 25 days ago in an attack on a reception in the Japanese ambassador's residence.In a sign that the government is serious, an official close to the negotiations has detailed the makeup of a three-to-five-member commission that would monitor any accord reached with the rebels.
NEWS
April 24, 1997
PRESIDENT ALBERTO FUJIMORI has earned the gratitude of law-abiding people everywhere -- not just in his own country -- for daring to use force to end a hostage-taking siege, the likes of which should not be tolerated by any government worthy of the name. His patience, his guile, his refusal to give in to the demands of terrorists culminated in a lightning strike that secured the freedom and saved the lives of 71 of 72 hostages held captive for four months at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
The violent end to Peru's long hostage crisis leaves the guerrilla group that carried out the siege, the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, with most of its members either dead or in jail.For the Tupac Amaru, Peru's second-largest rebel group, the seizing of the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima was from the start a last-ditch gamble.With 400 members, including its top leaders, in jail, the rebels had carried out only a handful of actions in 1996, apparently saving themselves up through the year for this one spectacular push.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- They order out for pizza, jog laps around the house, take French lessons and write letters home twice a week. If it weren't for the guerrillas with an unsettling habit of playing catch with grenades, the 72 hostages at the Japanese ambassador's mansion might seem to be at some offbeat retreat.Nearly 12 weeks after they went off to a cocktail party and were taken hostage, the captives of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement are making do in conditions that -- while far from ideal -- could be a lot worse.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
On Jan. 11, a 27-year-old American citizen named Lori Berenson began her second year in a prison cell in Peru that could be described as a dungeon. The prison sits 12,000 feet high in the Peruvian Andes and so many worlds away from where she grew up that her family and friends can't exactly say how she got there.Berenson, the daughter of two college professors, grew up near Grammercy Park in Manhattan. Her teachers at LaGuardia High School, where she was a straight-A student, say she stared at the floor and mumbled when talking to people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- Peruvian officials, signaling a reopening of negotiations, have renewed contacts with leftist guerrillas holding 74 hostages, establishing what President Alberto Fujimori described as a radio bridge to the rebels.The government is also approaching countries that could provide asylum to the rebels once they release the hostages they captured 25 days ago in an attack on a reception in the Japanese ambassador's residence.In a sign that the government is serious, an official close to the negotiations has detailed the makeup of a three-to-five-member commission that would monitor any accord reached with the rebels.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
LIMA, Peru -- Leftist guerrillas holding 74 Peruvian and foreign officials hostage unfurled banners on the roof of the residence of the Japanese ambassador yesterday, calling on the Peruvian government to resume talks to resolve the 18-day standoff."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1996
LIMA, Peru -- When Lori Helene Berenson was convicted of treason in Peru last week and sentenced to life in prison for her link with Marxist terrorists, Washington's reaction held to a U.S. principle: The conviction should not stand because the woman, guilty or innocent, did not receive a fair, open trial.Ms. Berenson was found guilty by a military judge, who was concealed behind a partition in a trial that was closed to the public. Her lawyers were not allowed to cross-examine witnesses or challenge key evidence.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 1996
LIMA, Peru -- Marxist rebels released the ambassadors of the Dominican Republic and Malaysia and 18 other hostages yesterday after a Peruvian Cabinet official entered the residence of the Japanese ambassador in what appeared to be the first direct contact between the rebels and the government.Dressed in business suits and looking surprisingly refreshed and composed, the freed hostages hugged one another as they left the residence, then waved to other hostages who watched from second-floor windows.
NEWS
By Andrew Reding | January 2, 1997
NEW YORK -- The unfolding hostage drama in Peru is only one symptom of a disorder now spreading through large portions of Latin America. From Mexico to Colombia to Peru, insurgencies are gaining strength. Behind this instability is a widening gap between rich and poor -- particularly between Native Americans and the descendants of European and Asian immigrants.Though Africa has the world's poorest countries, Latin American countries show the most glaring inequalities. In the developing world as a whole, the poorest 20 percent of the population receives 7 percent of total income.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 1996
LIMA, Peru -- Marxist rebels released the ambassadors of the Dominican Republic and Malaysia and 18 other hostages yesterday after a Peruvian Cabinet official entered the residence of the Japanese ambassador in what appeared to be the first direct contact between the rebels and the government.Dressed in business suits and looking surprisingly refreshed and composed, the freed hostages hugged one another as they left the residence, then waved to other hostages who watched from second-floor windows.
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