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Tunnel Vision

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NEWS
June 25, 1994
Baltimore's City Hall seems to be afflicted with a serious case of ethical tunnel vision. If what you do isn't against the narrowest interpretation of the ethics code, city officials seem to reason, there's nothing wrong in doing it.The fact that appearances also count, especially when the code embraces only the most outrageous conflicts of interest, means little. According to Daniel P. Henson III, the city's housing czar, there's nothing wrong in giving no-bid work to an in-law of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke as long as the mayor wasn't bribed.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank wondered recently what it must have been like to be married to Maryland coach Randy Edsall  during the tribulations accompanying  the 2-10  season of 2011. “How would that feel?” Plank asked rhetorically. So I decided to ask the coach's wife. I filed a profile of  Eileen Edsall for today's paper . Here are some additional quotes from the interview: (On his image) "I think they (media members) thought he came in and tried to make it all about him. Because they were his rules and this and that.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 24, 2001
ORDINARILY this column does not offer marital advice. Today is an exception. If you want to test your marriage, try driving into New York City through the Holland Tunnel with your mate as navigator. This has been a rite of spring my wife and I have attempted for the past four or five years. The experience has been well ... dramatic. We get lost, end up surrounded by kamikaze cabs, killer trucks and hordes of aggressive pedestrians. There is shouting in the front seat and, in the back seat, the kids get quiet.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
Officer William Kinsey had no sooner pointed his unmarked Chevy Tahoe north on Interstate 95 when he spotted the newest scofflaw. "There's a guy talking right there," he said. The guy was behind the wheel of a brown Ford pickup truck speeding along in the fast lane of the highway near Moravia Road. He was chatting away on a cell phone pressed to his ear, an activity that on Oct. 1 became a crime in Maryland. But it's not a crime for which Kinsey, a veteran with the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, can flip on his flashing lights and force the driver to pull over.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 17, 1992
Tsongas is laughing all the way to the White House.Some economists see light at the end of the tunnel. Those are the ones with tunnel vision.Yeltsin offers the other republics a choice. They can have a Russian army, or a Russian army.The Navy likes closing ports so much it is building five new ones to close later on.If the city didn't spend $360,000 for electronic message signs near the stadium, how would visitors find out that this is the city that reads?
FEATURES
By Susanne Trowbridge and Susanne Trowbridge,Special to The Sun | July 7, 1994
Private detective V. I. "Vic" Warshawski has seen her share of trouble, but in her latest adventure, "Tunnel Vision," she is beat up and threatened, has to crawl through a dark, damp passageway swarming with rats, and even gets arrested along with a gang of illegal Romanian immigrants whom she was interviewing to obtain information about a case. All that punishment can be rough on a woman, as well as her friends."No matter what you set out to do the most disastrous possible outcome takes place," Vic's close pal, Lotty Herschel, admonishes.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank wondered recently what it must have been like to be married to Maryland coach Randy Edsall  during the tribulations accompanying  the 2-10  season of 2011. “How would that feel?” Plank asked rhetorically. So I decided to ask the coach's wife. I filed a profile of  Eileen Edsall for today's paper . Here are some additional quotes from the interview: (On his image) "I think they (media members) thought he came in and tried to make it all about him. Because they were his rules and this and that.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
Baltimore police are questioning several people, including family members, in connection with the disappearance of an 8-year-old Northwood girl. Since Marciana Monia Ringo disappeared early Tuesday after her mother's boyfriend dropped her off at school, investigators from the homicide and the missing persons squads have been talking to everyone they can think of, said homicide Sgt. Jack Barrick. "It's a missing persons case, but it's obviously suspicious," Barrick said last night. "How can you not say that?"
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | February 10, 1995
London. -- A journalist once asked James Grant, the executive director of UNICEF who died two weeks ago, why the agency had spent eight times its allotted budget on the 1990 summit of world leaders that launched the Convention on the Rights of the Child.Mr. Grant began his reply, ''You have children, I have children, we all have children.''It was this single-mindedness -- detractors called it tunnel vision -- which, combined with extravagant goals and plain hard work, made UNICEF in many ways the most successful of all U.N. agencies.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 5, 2002
Arnon Goldfinger's group portrait of the Yiddish actor and song-and-dance man Pesach'ke Burstein and his family troupe is the documentary equivalent of a page-turner, filled with anecdotes that echo through a century-spanning saga and moments that define more than one generation at a time. Born into the tight-knit, observant Jewish communities of Eastern Europe in 1906 (he lived first in Poland, then in Russia), Burstein fled home at age 15, when he hooked up with a traveling Yiddish troupe.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 6, 2009
Even before the undead yet live-wire comedy-horror hit "Zombieland," Jesse Eisenberg had established a beachhead as the thinking man's Michael Cera: slender and sensitive but also emotionally tough and sinewy. In "The Squid and the Whale," playing the older adolescent son of an estranged intellectual couple, and in "Adventureland," playing a recent college grad and aspiring travel writer, spinning his wheels and falling in love at a summer job in an amusement park, Eisenberg was equally potent playing fecklessness or sincerity, and better yet when he played both at the same time.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 14, 2007
The howling and barking begin before the double doors swing open to unleash the Ravens for their short walk down the concourse and into the darkened tunnel. It's game time, and the team that has reached the playoffs on emotion as much as timely offensive plays and crunching defense is filling its tank. The biggest men, helmets already in place, lead the way, the clatter of their spikes lost beneath the wave of sound that rolls from the locker room and is met by a wave of sound from the field and the stands.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Hasim Rahman has been in the spotlight before, but somehow he has always ended up slipping back into the shadows. This time, though, could be different. Heading into tonight's World Boxing Council interim heavyweight title fight with Monte Barrett in Chicago, the Baltimore native appears more focused, having shed distractions and pounds that once dragged him down. "A man that don't know his history is bound to repeat it. And I'm here to tell you that I've been there, done that. I know clearly what happened and what I did wrong," Rahman said last month at his home - and training base - in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
Baltimore police are questioning several people, including family members, in connection with the disappearance of an 8-year-old Northwood girl. Since Marciana Monia Ringo disappeared early Tuesday after her mother's boyfriend dropped her off at school, investigators from the homicide and the missing persons squads have been talking to everyone they can think of, said homicide Sgt. Jack Barrick. "It's a missing persons case, but it's obviously suspicious," Barrick said last night. "How can you not say that?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 5, 2002
Arnon Goldfinger's group portrait of the Yiddish actor and song-and-dance man Pesach'ke Burstein and his family troupe is the documentary equivalent of a page-turner, filled with anecdotes that echo through a century-spanning saga and moments that define more than one generation at a time. Born into the tight-knit, observant Jewish communities of Eastern Europe in 1906 (he lived first in Poland, then in Russia), Burstein fled home at age 15, when he hooked up with a traveling Yiddish troupe.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 24, 2001
ORDINARILY this column does not offer marital advice. Today is an exception. If you want to test your marriage, try driving into New York City through the Holland Tunnel with your mate as navigator. This has been a rite of spring my wife and I have attempted for the past four or five years. The experience has been well ... dramatic. We get lost, end up surrounded by kamikaze cabs, killer trucks and hordes of aggressive pedestrians. There is shouting in the front seat and, in the back seat, the kids get quiet.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
Officer William Kinsey had no sooner pointed his unmarked Chevy Tahoe north on Interstate 95 when he spotted the newest scofflaw. "There's a guy talking right there," he said. The guy was behind the wheel of a brown Ford pickup truck speeding along in the fast lane of the highway near Moravia Road. He was chatting away on a cell phone pressed to his ear, an activity that on Oct. 1 became a crime in Maryland. But it's not a crime for which Kinsey, a veteran with the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, can flip on his flashing lights and force the driver to pull over.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- New Tampa Bay third baseman Wade Boggs bulked up over the off-season, apparently to make a concerted attempt to give the Devil Rays a major historical milestone in their inaugural season.Boggs is exactly 200 hits away from 3,000 and says he has a chance to get there this year."It's something I've looked forward to my whole career," Boggs said. "Now, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel, because I'm in the tunnel. Before, it was just a glimmer."He might be a long shot to get there this year, considering that he had just 103 hits playing less than full time with the Yankees in 1997, but he obviously wanted to give himself the best possible chance to stay healthy and productive all season.
NEWS
December 30, 1995
IN THE HOTLY competitive world of maritime trade, Baltimore's port rivals in Philadelphia and Norfolk have gained a key advantage in the battle for cargo business. Both of those ports can ship container cargo inland on larger double-stacked railroad flat cars; Baltimore can't. Its railroad tunnels leading to the port are too low.That's becoming a distinct disadvantage. Without higher tunnels, the Port of Baltimore is going to lose cargo in the years ahead as steamship lines increasingly shift to the bigger container boxes to reduce expenses in their cutthroat industry.
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