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By Jim Rosapepe and Sheilah Kast | January 25, 2011
Tunisia, January 2011. Romania, December 1989. The similarities are eerie. Each country was governed for 21/2 decades by an autocrat. In both countries, the people, not the elite, launch the revolution. Soldiers allied with competing factions are shooting at each other. Common people are outraged to see the palaces of the dictator's family. French is the second language of the elite. Democrats around the world are cheering the revolution while security professionals in Western governments fret about stability.
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October 11, 2013
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NEWS
January 26, 2011
In appealing to the U.S. government to "promote democracy" in Tunisia, the authors of "In Tunisia, history repeats (sort of)" (Jan. 26) are asking the U.S. to completely reverse its decades-long policy of supporting dictators throughout the world who allow their populations to be used as low-wage labor for multinational corporations. Short of a popular revolution here, no such radical departure will occur. Under Democrats, under Republicans, dictators are supported while meaningless phrases about supporting democracy are uttered to the public by politicians from both pro-business parties.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
I have noticed a strange difference in how the media (including the FOX propaganda channel) cover similar events - and no, I'm not talking about the budget nonsense or any other Washington stupidity. I mean the way you refer to the young people taking to the streets in Arab countries like Syria and Tunisia as "rebels" engaged in a "revolution," while young people in England doing exactly the same things are called "criminals" engaged in "riots. " Methinks your double standard is showing.
NEWS
By BEN BARBER | July 10, 1994
Tunis. -- Some say this is the finest little dictatorship in Africa.Recent events -- the guerrillas of the Palestine Liberation Organization packing their shadowy troubles off with them for Gaza after 12 years in exile, and more than 50 heads of state attending the annual get-together of the Organization of African Unity last month -- have diverted the focus from the backdrop Tunisia provides for such drama.Yet, a farmer planting seedlings on a hillside spits out the words: "There is no democracy here -- you are 500 years ahead of us in America."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1994
JERUSALEM -- In another sign that it is shaking off its role as Middle East outcast, Israel agreed with Tunisia this weekend to exchange low-level representatives as a first step toward eventual diplomatic relations.Technically, the step was a small one. The two countries announced Saturday night at the United Nations that they would appoint economic liaison officers, who would work out of the Belgian embassies in Tunis and Tel Aviv.The road to true diplomatic ties could still be long.Nevertheless, the move underlined how far Israelis and Arabs have come toward reconciliation, especially in the 13 months since Israel agreed with the Palestine Liberation Organization on Palestinian self-rule in the occupied territories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2006
La Marsa, a chic little bar in Fells Point, has added a small tapas-style menu to its offerings. Owner Raouf Yousfi, who hails from Tunisia, has hired chef Najiba Debbiehi to turn out Mediterranean-inspired nibbles like tagine, kebobs and falafel. Portions are small, and the options are limited. If you arrive hungry, odds are you will leave if not hungry then certainly less than full. Service is lackadaisical. Poor:]
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2004
TUNIS, Tunisia - The government abruptly called off a summit of the Arab League late last night even as leaders poured into this seaside city, a last-minute cancellation that threw in stark relief the acrimony roiling the region. The collapse of the summit, which had been scheduled to begin tomorrow, suggested that tenuous Arab unity has crumbled under the pressure of the Palestinian uprising, the U.S.-led war on Iraq and demands for sweeping reforms of repressive and corrupt Arab governments.
NEWS
September 3, 2010
Eric Gordon scored a game-high 21 points to lead the United States in a 92-57 rout of Tunisia that gave the Americans an unblemished record in the preliminary round of the FIBA World Championship in Istanbul. Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook each scored 14 points as the U.S. finished atop Group B at 5-0. The Americans next play Monday against Angola, the fourth-place finisher from Group A. "In practice we have to get better," U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski said.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
Habib Bourguiba, 96, Tunisia's former president who fought for his country's independence and bucked Muslim traditions during three decades as the benign and forward-looking dictator, died Thursday. Mr. Bourguiba was deposed in a 1987 palace coup. For more than 30 years, he modernized his nation while retaining the respect of much of the Arab world. Since 1987, after being toppled by then-Prime Minister Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, the former president had lived in the shadows. Despite the solitude of his final years, Tunisia has stayed the course Mr. Bourguiba set after the small North African nation gained independence from France in 1956.
NEWS
March 16, 2011
Kimberly Katz is a professor of Middle East history who desperately needs a refresher course in her own area of specialty. Far from being the models of "nonviolent resistance to oppression" claimed by Professor Katz ( "Nonviolent movements nothing new in the Middle East," March 7), the Palestinians and their supporters across the Arab world have engaged in a long and bloody war against Israel and its people. This war has taken many forms, including multiple ground and air attacks by Arab armies, years of Palestine Liberation Organization terrorism that included the notorious murder of Olympic athletes, waves of suicide bombings, and rocket attacks on Israeli towns that continue to this day. The one unifying factor of all of these tactics has been a complete disregard for human life and a willingness on the part of Israel's enemies to employ extreme and indiscriminate violence as a means to advance their cause.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
The Arab world is quaking for democracy. Tunisia has led the surge; Egypt, Bahrain and Libya follow in its footsteps. Arab revolutionaries must learn from the events that have unfolded in every struggle for one's unalienable rights in the past, from that of Gandhi to Martin Luther King Jr. Reports continue to pour in ascribing violence to governments under siege. Libyan armies have even bombed certain parts of their own capital. Revolutionaries must consider the government's resort to violence as a weakness.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
In appealing to the U.S. government to "promote democracy" in Tunisia, the authors of "In Tunisia, history repeats (sort of)" (Jan. 26) are asking the U.S. to completely reverse its decades-long policy of supporting dictators throughout the world who allow their populations to be used as low-wage labor for multinational corporations. Short of a popular revolution here, no such radical departure will occur. Under Democrats, under Republicans, dictators are supported while meaningless phrases about supporting democracy are uttered to the public by politicians from both pro-business parties.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe and Sheilah Kast | January 25, 2011
Tunisia, January 2011. Romania, December 1989. The similarities are eerie. Each country was governed for 21/2 decades by an autocrat. In both countries, the people, not the elite, launch the revolution. Soldiers allied with competing factions are shooting at each other. Common people are outraged to see the palaces of the dictator's family. French is the second language of the elite. Democrats around the world are cheering the revolution while security professionals in Western governments fret about stability.
NEWS
September 3, 2010
Eric Gordon scored a game-high 21 points to lead the United States in a 92-57 rout of Tunisia that gave the Americans an unblemished record in the preliminary round of the FIBA World Championship in Istanbul. Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook each scored 14 points as the U.S. finished atop Group B at 5-0. The Americans next play Monday against Angola, the fourth-place finisher from Group A. "In practice we have to get better," U.S. coach Mike Krzyzewski said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2006
La Marsa, a chic little bar in Fells Point, has added a small tapas-style menu to its offerings. Owner Raouf Yousfi, who hails from Tunisia, has hired chef Najiba Debbiehi to turn out Mediterranean-inspired nibbles like tagine, kebobs and falafel. Portions are small, and the options are limited. If you arrive hungry, odds are you will leave if not hungry then certainly less than full. Service is lackadaisical. Poor:]
NEWS
April 16, 1992
The sanctions taken against Libya will not unduly inconvenience that regime. The diplomats being expelled from other countries were not carrying on normal relations anyway. The arms that won't be sold for the duration of the sanctions would not have altered Libya's capacity to harm its neighbors, which is real but limited. The passengers who won't be able to fly to Tripoli will need an extra day to drive in from Tunisia or Egypt.So starts the first round in a test of will between Libyan President Muammar el Kadafi and the world community.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
The Arab world is quaking for democracy. Tunisia has led the surge; Egypt, Bahrain and Libya follow in its footsteps. Arab revolutionaries must learn from the events that have unfolded in every struggle for one's unalienable rights in the past, from that of Gandhi to Martin Luther King Jr. Reports continue to pour in ascribing violence to governments under siege. Libyan armies have even bombed certain parts of their own capital. Revolutionaries must consider the government's resort to violence as a weakness.
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 9, 2005
PARIS -- They are French-speaking youths, sons of their country, but largely unaccepted by "true Frenchmen," who still see them as grandsons of lands elsewhere. The frustrations of France's immigrant youth, caught up in the ghettos where unemployment figures reach 40 percent, has long been obvious, and nowhere more so than in the north of the capital, where teens have less attachment to the Eiffel Tower than the millions of tourists who flock here each year. "Put yourself in the skin of a young person," said Kart Tahar, who has been in Paris for 25 of his 42 years, an immigrant from Tunisia who arrived with his family.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2004
TUNIS, Tunisia - The government abruptly called off a summit of the Arab League late last night even as leaders poured into this seaside city, a last-minute cancellation that threw in stark relief the acrimony roiling the region. The collapse of the summit, which had been scheduled to begin tomorrow, suggested that tenuous Arab unity has crumbled under the pressure of the Palestinian uprising, the U.S.-led war on Iraq and demands for sweeping reforms of repressive and corrupt Arab governments.
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