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By Kevin Cowherd | December 3, 2009
I f I could give one bit of advice to the Ravens as they prepare to face the Green Bay Packers on Monday night at Lambeau Field, it would be: Stay close to those heated benches when you're not in the game. I say this because the temperature at game time is expected to be in the low 20s. There's also a good chance of snow. And because this is Lambeau in December, you can pretty much count on hitting the bad-weather trifecta. That's right: The wind should be blowing, too. Look, they don't call it "the Frozen Tundra" because people are slathering on Coppertone and wearing Hawaiian shirts.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
It wasn't just any water main break that Fox 45 morning news reporter Rick Boone found in West Baltimore yesterday. No, it was a "frozen tundra. " "I've been a TV reporter for about 15 years, and I've never, ever seen the after effects of a water main break like I see here," said Boone. Then, on the edge of the tundra, a car appeared. "Slow down, slow down," Boone yelled to the driver. Then, to the camera operator, "Move out of the way!" The car drove smoothly over the ice without skidding.
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NEWS
By Anchorage Daily News | September 25, 2005
ANCHORAGE // Melting snow has triggered the warmest summers across Arctic Alaska in at least 400 years, setting in motion tree and shrub growth that will accelerate warming by two to seven times as the century unfolds. The slow expansion of the tundra's snow-free season by about 2.5 days per decade since the 1960s explains 95 percent of the recent rise in summer temperatures, and is far more influential than changes in vegetation, sea ice, atmospheric circulation or clouds, according to a report published in Science Express.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd , kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
If I could give one bit of advice to the Ravens as they prepare to face the Green Bay Packers on Monday night at Lambeau Field, it would be: Stay close to those heated benches when you're not in the game. I say this because the temperature at game time is expected to be in the low 20s. There's also a good chance of snow. And because this is Lambeau in December, you can pretty much count on hitting the bad-weather trifecta. That's right: The wind should be blowing, too. Look, they don't call it "the Frozen Tundra" because people are slathering on Coppertone and wearing Hawaiian shirts.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
ROCK HALL - Researchers released a young tundra swan at an Eastern Shore wildlife refuge near here yesterday, beginning what they hope will become a 3,000-mile migration to the frigid sub-Arctic landscape where she was born. The bird, which was rescued last summer after landing in an oil impoundment pit at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already spent most of her life in the company of well-meaning humans. While undergoing treatment in Alaska, the swan was left behind when her parents and 70,000 to 90,000 other swans began their annual journey south.
NEWS
By Diane Tennant and Diane Tennant,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 9, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - The swan was alone, and that was wrong. Alone in a field in sub-zero Iowa, when all her family had reached wintering grounds in Back Bay and Hog Island, Va. When rescuers reached her, the day before Thanksgiving, they found her wing was broken. The tundra swan could never reach the flock in Virginia. Or could she? Terese Evans of Black Hawk Wildlife Rehabilitation Project took the call from animal control. She had an enclosure 10 feet square in her back yard in Waterloo, Iowa.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2002
YANRAKYNNOT, Russia - The native elders have no explanation. Scientists are perplexed as well. The icy realm of the Eskimo - the tundra and ice of Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland - has started to thaw. Strange portents are everywhere. Thunder and lightning, once rare, have become commonplace. An eerie warm wind blows in from the south. Hunters who prided themselves on their ability to read the sky say they no longer can predict the sudden blizzards. "The Earth," one hunter concludes, "is turning faster."
NEWS
September 5, 1999
TOOLIK LAKE, Alaska -- The last days of summer are rapidly fading here in the land of the midnight sun, 160 miles above the Arctic Circle, spurring a frenzy by animals and plants alike to prepare for the hyperborean winter's nine-month onslaught.Also racing against the clock to finish their field work are dozens of international scientists at this remote research site, searching for small pieces that could fit into the puzzle of global warming.With an urgency that drives 18-hour workdays (much less tiring under the 24-hour sun)
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
It wasn't just any water main break that Fox 45 morning news reporter Rick Boone found in West Baltimore yesterday. No, it was a "frozen tundra. " "I've been a TV reporter for about 15 years, and I've never, ever seen the after effects of a water main break like I see here," said Boone. Then, on the edge of the tundra, a car appeared. "Slow down, slow down," Boone yelled to the driver. Then, to the camera operator, "Move out of the way!" The car drove smoothly over the ice without skidding.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2008
I live in White Hall, and last month I visited Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, on a polar bear expedition with World Wildlife Fund/Natural Habitat Adventures. The trip was unbelievable, perfect and beyond words. We were able to travel on the tundra to observe the bears in their natural habitat. This is a photo of a mama bear and her two cubs approaching the tundra vehicle. This time of year, they travel to Churchill waiting for the Hudson Bay to freeze so they can go out to hunt seals. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
TRAVEL
December 21, 2008
I live in White Hall, and last month I visited Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, on a polar bear expedition with World Wildlife Fund/Natural Habitat Adventures. The trip was unbelievable, perfect and beyond words. We were able to travel on the tundra to observe the bears in their natural habitat. This is a photo of a mama bear and her two cubs approaching the tundra vehicle. This time of year, they travel to Churchill waiting for the Hudson Bay to freeze so they can go out to hunt seals. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2008
It isn't a typical day when a Maryland teenager wakes up and sees a polar bear outside her window. But that's what happened to Alexandra Van Dusen. On another day, while Van Dusen and a group of students cooked hamburgers on an outside grill, one polar bear scared away another one, she said. "The bears don't get too close to one another unless they're mating," said Van Dusen, a 17-year-old junior at John Carroll School in Bel Air. "They were fun to watch." Van Dusen was able to observe the polar bears when she attended a leadership camp offered by Polar Bear International, a group that supports research projects benefiting the world's polar bears.
SPORTS
December 28, 2007
Once upon a time, when the NFL Films' "Voice of God," John Facenda, intoned about "frozen tundra," it was a given that Lambeau Field was a playoff home-field advantage like no other. That would seem to be the case no more. Last weekend's Packers-Bears game at bitterly cold and blustery Soldier Field proved what Vince Lombardi could have never imagined. When it comes to facing Old Man Winter, these Packers are wimps. Even Brett Favre said as much. Chicago, with Kyle Orton at quarterback, manhandled NFC North champion Green Bay, 35-7, and the weather was a key factor.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 20, 2007
I've been checking the weather in Green Bay the past few days, thinking about the NFL playoffs. Two years ago almost to the day, I was there doing a story on how that charming little football hamlet, all decked out for the holidays, was talking about the prospect of the Packers finishing out of the playoffs for the first time in umpteen years. I've been in some cold places, but the combination of arctic chill and wind in Green Bay was unbelievable. It hurt to walk to your car. So I was reminded of that as the Dallas Cowboys lost to the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday.
NEWS
By Anchorage Daily News | September 25, 2005
ANCHORAGE // Melting snow has triggered the warmest summers across Arctic Alaska in at least 400 years, setting in motion tree and shrub growth that will accelerate warming by two to seven times as the century unfolds. The slow expansion of the tundra's snow-free season by about 2.5 days per decade since the 1960s explains 95 percent of the recent rise in summer temperatures, and is far more influential than changes in vegetation, sea ice, atmospheric circulation or clouds, according to a report published in Science Express.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
ROCK HALL - Researchers released a young tundra swan at an Eastern Shore wildlife refuge near here yesterday, beginning what they hope will become a 3,000-mile migration to the frigid sub-Arctic landscape where she was born. The bird, which was rescued last summer after landing in an oil impoundment pit at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, has already spent most of her life in the company of well-meaning humans. While undergoing treatment in Alaska, the swan was left behind when her parents and 70,000 to 90,000 other swans began their annual journey south.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | March 25, 1995
Ever seen a river turn from freeze to fire? Or watched a blue-sky morning blizzard?At dawn, the Susquehanna River, some 40 miles above where it widens into Chesapeake Bay, appears littered with ice downstream of us, where it braids through forested islands of the Conejohela Flats, near the village of Washington Boro, Pa.The weather is a face-cracking 10 degrees, enhanced by a stiff northwest wind, as sunrise slops over the eastern hills and splashes into...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
Magnet and Alaska are ready for their housewarming. Yes, the Baltimore Zoo's polar bear duo is ready to welcome visitors to their humble new abode at the exhibit Polar Bear Watch, which opens Saturday. The $7 million project, the zoo's first major addition in nearly 10 years, is more of an Arctic adventure than a zoo exhibit. "It's really different. This is big, big time. It's different than any of the other exhibits we've ever done," says Ben Gross, public relations manager of the Baltimore Zoo. "It's set up like a travelogue from Churchill, Manitoba, the polar bear capital of the world."
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