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By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
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NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 7, 2007
Tuna casserole and Julia Child? It's hard to believe America's favorite chef used canned foods, but Laura Shapiro writes in her new biography, Julia Child, that Child created just such a recipe while working for S.S. Pierce, a Boston canned food company. She made a version "worthy of any dinner table she knew, including her own," Shapiro writes. Using today's more healthful canned soups and microwaveable brown rice, I've adapted the recipe to fit our busy lives. Comfort food needs comfort wine - in this case, a soft, fruity shiraz.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
Deb Brewer of Export, Pa., requested a Tuna-Noodle Casserole recipe, and Joan Sessoms of Hope Mills, N.C., responded. Sessoms wrote, "There are two ways to fix this casserole. Fix it all together and then bake it - which does not save on electricity during the summer months - or get out the electric frying pan. The only difference would be the added bread crumbs. You can also use canned salmon in place of tuna fish. Easy on the salt; the fish is loaded with it." Tuna-Noodle Casserole Serves 4 4 ounces uncooked noodles 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1/3 chopped onion 1/2 chopped green pepper 1 (10 1/2 -ounce)
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 18, 2007
This is a new version of the tuna casserole Mom used to make. Instead of baking the casserole for an hour, I just sauteed the vegetables, mixed them with the boiled pasta and finished the dish under the broiler to melt the cheese. It's a meal you can make in minutes without a trip to a supermarket if you keep these staples on hand: canned tuna, macaroni, canned pimentos, Worcestershire sauce, carrots, onions and frozen peas. One item I find very useful is dried mushrooms, especially wild mushrooms.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
Want to bake a tuna casserole and a loaf of blueberry bread? Even if you're skeptical, there's an excellent chance you'll be glad you did.Also, how about a recipe for a filling for kolaches which answers the request of Sally Fleming of Bend, Ore.John Eisele of Columbia requested the tuna casserole. He wrote, "When I was traveling, I remember a tuna casserole that had peas in it with a thick sauce and a strong but enjoyable taste of tuna." He also noted that he had tried duplicating the recipe but had not been successful.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1999
The "Tuna"-tics are back. Washington's Kennedy Center is serving up what it calls "a third helping of 'Tuna.' " Specifically, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, the two-man team that portrays almost the entire fictitious town of Tuna, Texas, will present "Red, White and Tuna," the third installment of their Tuna trilogy, in the Eisenhower Theater, beginning Tuesday.In December, Sears and Williams brought a little early holiday cheer to the Mechanic Theatre with "A Tuna Christmas," Part 2 of the trilogy that began more than 16 years ago with "Greater Tuna."
NEWS
January 28, 1994
In the Fast & Fresh column in Wednesday's A La Carte section, it was unclear which dish the carrots, raisins, mayonnaise and lemon juice were for. They are the ingredients ** for a carrot-raisin salad to accompany the tuna casserole.The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | May 27, 1998
Item: Betty Crocker Tuna HelperWhat you get: 5 servingsCost: about $1.80Preparation time: about 10 minutes on stove top, 16 to 18 minutes in microwave, 30 to 35 minutes in conventional ovenReview: I've never been a helper fan, but the sign said "improved," and the Creamy Pasta flavor looked like a quick version of the tuna casserole my 15-month-old loves. Results were mixed. The Creamy Pasta scored high even with the nontuna fan at lunch. The new Tuna Melt flavor was very cheesy, and the addition of chopped green onion and diced tomato complemented it. But the Creamy Broccoli was bland and offered no evidence of broccoli.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | July 7, 2004
Cooking with your child can be fun and educational. And if you're lucky, the kid may learn something, too. Just in time to dispel the summer doldrums, author Tina Davis has come out with Look and Cook (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2004, $19.95), a new cookbook for kids. The easy-to-read book contains 50 classic and kid-friendly recipes. All of the dishes are made from scratch, which will prove revelatory for children accustomed to frozen fish sticks. Grown-ups will enjoy the drawings that Davis has gleaned from vintage cookbooks, although kids accustomed to colorful computer games and big-screen TVs probably won't be impressed.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 28, 1990
At our house the first "cuisine" decision of the day is what to put in the kids' lunch boxes.The kids lobby for their favorite items, basically anything "frosted." I pretty much hold to the parental party line that lunches should be oppressively nutritional. But after several instances of packing carrot sticks in the kids' lunches, only to have the carrots returned home unharmed, I have broadened my definition of what constitutes a good lunch.First of all, it has to be eaten. You can load those lunch boxes down all you want with beta carotenes, but if the kids won't eat them, the only health benefit they get is the muscular one of carrying around a heavy lunch box.So I have learned to compromise.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | July 7, 2004
Cooking with your child can be fun and educational. And if you're lucky, the kid may learn something, too. Just in time to dispel the summer doldrums, author Tina Davis has come out with Look and Cook (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2004, $19.95), a new cookbook for kids. The easy-to-read book contains 50 classic and kid-friendly recipes. All of the dishes are made from scratch, which will prove revelatory for children accustomed to frozen fish sticks. Grown-ups will enjoy the drawings that Davis has gleaned from vintage cookbooks, although kids accustomed to colorful computer games and big-screen TVs probably won't be impressed.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Sit down for a chat with chef John Fleer, and it's immediately clear you're not talking to an ordinary cook. For one thing, the "foothills cuisine" he has developed at Blackberry Farm, a world-class luxury retreat in the Tennessee shadows of the Smoky Mountains, has earned accolades for its sophisticated take on regional good food. For another, he's as comfortable discussing the culture and philosophy of food as the techniques of preparing it. After all, he began his cooking career to help pay his way as a graduate student in religion and culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 21, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal and an entertaining menu. SUNDAY / Family Prepare roast lamb your way for the family. Serve with Brown Rice With Green Beans and Almonds. Add a Boston lettuce salad and whole-wheat rolls. Buy a lemon meringue pie for dessert. Plan ahead: Cook brown rice the day before.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
Deb Brewer of Export, Pa., requested a Tuna-Noodle Casserole recipe, and Joan Sessoms of Hope Mills, N.C., responded. Sessoms wrote, "There are two ways to fix this casserole. Fix it all together and then bake it - which does not save on electricity during the summer months - or get out the electric frying pan. The only difference would be the added bread crumbs. You can also use canned salmon in place of tuna fish. Easy on the salt; the fish is loaded with it." Tuna-Noodle Casserole Serves 4 4 ounces uncooked noodles 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1/3 chopped onion 1/2 chopped green pepper 1 (10 1/2 -ounce)
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 2001
Certain occasions demand comfort food: shaking off a stressful work day, mending a broken heart, or getting through the month of January. With this winter shaping up to be the coldest in years, ovens will be working overtime pumping out food to make us forget about the finger-numbing weather outside. So we asked area restaurateurs and chefs what foods warm them up during these bitter days and nights. A childhood memory On a recent snowy day, Pease Porridge Hot owner Eileen Zack whipped up a tuna casserole for her customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1999
The "Tuna"-tics are back. Washington's Kennedy Center is serving up what it calls "a third helping of 'Tuna.' " Specifically, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, the two-man team that portrays almost the entire fictitious town of Tuna, Texas, will present "Red, White and Tuna," the third installment of their Tuna trilogy, in the Eisenhower Theater, beginning Tuesday.In December, Sears and Williams brought a little early holiday cheer to the Mechanic Theatre with "A Tuna Christmas," Part 2 of the trilogy that began more than 16 years ago with "Greater Tuna."
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 21, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal and an entertaining menu. SUNDAY / Family Prepare roast lamb your way for the family. Serve with Brown Rice With Green Beans and Almonds. Add a Boston lettuce salad and whole-wheat rolls. Buy a lemon meringue pie for dessert. Plan ahead: Cook brown rice the day before.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
Sit down for a chat with chef John Fleer, and it's immediately clear you're not talking to an ordinary cook. For one thing, the "foothills cuisine" he has developed at Blackberry Farm, a world-class luxury retreat in the Tennessee shadows of the Smoky Mountains, has earned accolades for its sophisticated take on regional good food. For another, he's as comfortable discussing the culture and philosophy of food as the techniques of preparing it. After all, he began his cooking career to help pay his way as a graduate student in religion and culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | May 27, 1998
Item: Betty Crocker Tuna HelperWhat you get: 5 servingsCost: about $1.80Preparation time: about 10 minutes on stove top, 16 to 18 minutes in microwave, 30 to 35 minutes in conventional ovenReview: I've never been a helper fan, but the sign said "improved," and the Creamy Pasta flavor looked like a quick version of the tuna casserole my 15-month-old loves. Results were mixed. The Creamy Pasta scored high even with the nontuna fan at lunch. The new Tuna Melt flavor was very cheesy, and the addition of chopped green onion and diced tomato complemented it. But the Creamy Broccoli was bland and offered no evidence of broccoli.
NEWS
January 28, 1994
In the Fast & Fresh column in Wednesday's A La Carte section, it was unclear which dish the carrots, raisins, mayonnaise and lemon juice were for. They are the ingredients ** for a carrot-raisin salad to accompany the tuna casserole.The Sun regrets the error.
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