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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | October 1, 2012
"Life's better with friends. " - Gyp Rosetti Like most men, Nucky Thompson dreams about bacon. Unlike most men, he also dreams about dead choirboys. Yes, the whole "assassinating your surrogate son" thing is finally starting to catch up to Nucky, and it's blinding the patriarch of Atlantic City from the chaos brewing around him. As an episode, "Bone for Tuna" belongs to the chief agent of said chaos, Gyp Rosetti. His one-man blockade of the highway between Atlantic City and New York has finally caught Nucky's attention, but his one-man assault on the English language and social convention wages on stronger than ever.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
October is a gorgeous month in Maryland - prime time to do a little grilling and dine alfresco. At Bushmill Tavern in Abingdon, chef Mark Littleton regularly grills burgers and steaks, but occasionally he also likes to add fish to the mix.  Littleton, who gained an enthusiastic following during his years cooking in Baltimore restaurants, including Annabel Lee Tavern and Adam's Eve Gastropub, says autumn is the perfect time to whip up crunchy, flavorful...
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 16, 2012
Federal health regulators have linked a recent salmonella outbreak in several states, including 11 people infected in Maryland, to yellowfin tuna produced at a California company. Moon Marine USA Corp. of Cupertino, CA. , has voluntarily recalled more than 58,000 pounds of tuna labeled Nakaochi Scrape, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.  Nakaocho Scrape is tuna backmeat with a ground up appearance that is scraped from the bones of the fish. The product isn't sold to individual consumers, but may have been used to make sushi, sashimi, ceviche and other dishes available at grocery stores and restaurants.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The dark specks swirling around in big water-filled tanks at the Columbus Center hardly look like fish, much less the kings of the ocean. But from these tiny beginnings, a team of Maryland scientists hopes to unlock the secrets of "farming" Atlantic bluefin tuna, one of the most prized fish on the planet — and one of the most threatened. "For me, it's the Holy Grail," said Yonathan Zohar, a professor of marine biotechnology with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and head of the aquaculture research center at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2004
Kathy Cotugno of Woodstock, Ill., was looking for a recipe for a tuna-and-potato-chip casserole that did not contain any noodles. Many readers sent us the same recipe for this old-fashioned classic. Most have had it in their collections for many years. For some, it was one of the first dishes they learned to prepare and for all it is still a tried-and-true family favorite. It is by no means a fancy dish, but it is truly a comfort food that kids and grown-ups alike are sure to enjoy. I recommend spending the extra money and using a white albacore tuna packed in water.
NEWS
By Jae Hong Lee | August 19, 2002
HERE ARE two quick questions: Did you know that young children and expecting mothers should eat no more than two 6-ounce cans of tuna a week? Did you know that regularly eating more might cause neurologic problems for babies and young children because of a toxin called methylmercury? If you didn't know, you can blame the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has done a poor job of informing the public about this important health risk. I can recall eating tuna all the time as a child.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
The annual Ocean City Tuna Tournament will be held this weekend, and if reports from last weekend are any indication, some extraordinary catches could be brought to the scales at the Ocean City Fishing Center tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
Forget the steaks or even the hot dogs and hamburgers.The entree of choice for the tailgaters at Foxboro Stadium on Sunday will be Tuna.Grilled Tuna. Smoked Tuna. Even Canned Tuna.The Tuna, a k a Bill Parcells, is returning to New England on Sunday night for the latest chapter in one of the NFL's longest-running soap operas.It's his first game back since the Jets gave up four draft picks to permit him to get out of his New England contract and return to New York. It's not a coincidence this game will be on national television on TNT.They haven't forgotten in New England.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 15, 2001
Item: StarKist Tuna in the No Drain Package What you get: 3 two-ounce servings Cost: About $2.25 Nutritional content: Premium Chunk White Albacore in water - 70 calories, 1 gram fat, 0 grams saturated fat, 250 milligrams sodium, 0 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams sugars Preparation time: Tear open package and use Review: Can you improve a product just by improving its packaging? Well, this StarKist Tuna in the No Drain Package sure tastes better to me. Maybe I'm just taken in by how neat and easy it is to use. There's no can to open, no water to drain off. The tuna inside is firm, not mealy like some canned tuna.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | December 26, 2007
What makes sashimi tuna more special than tuna? I know it is eaten raw. Is it more susceptible to mercury contamination? Sashimi is a misunderstood term. The word "sashimi" is the Japanese term for "raw fish." But in America, "sashimi grade" has come to mean high-grade, very red cuts of tuna. However, the term "sashimi" on labels isn't regulated in the United States, so there is no guarantee attached to buying something called sashimi tuna. In this country, fish that is destined to be served raw must be frozen, except tuna, which loses quality if it's frozen.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
CAMBRIDGE — This historic Eastern Shore city offers a glorious view of the Choptank River, but its working waterfront is a forlorn place. The once-thriving tuna canneries are long gone, and a failed port now sits at the mouth of Cambridge Creek, hosting occasional concerts and weddings. Cambridge officials are pushing a plan to revitalize the waterfront by redeveloping that parcel. They hope an Annapolis developer's plan for a $50 million mixed-use development will attract retirees and young professionals, as well as upscale stores and restaurants, and boost the city's long-struggling economy.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
The Chasseur is a likable enough tavern. Think of it as the kind of place where you can sit down for a good square meal of well-prepared comfort food and then, if you're feeling perky, spend some time at the adjacent bar with your friends and neighbors. There's potential for The Chasseur to be more than just likable. Given time and effort, The Chasseur could develop into something even better — a winning tavern. Here we're talking about a place you'd work into your schedule, maybe spread the word about, or, if it's really special, keep it to yourself.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 9, 2013
Tommy Jones of Severna Park took the top spot at Ocean City's 40th Annual White Marlin Open Wednesday, catching an 83-pound white marlin that could be worth $980,000 in prize money. Today is the last day to fish in the tournament, one of the largest billfish competitions in the world, where hundreds of anglers compete to catch the largest tuna, wahoo, shark, dolphin, blue marlin and most importantly, white marlin. Anglers are allowed three days during the five-day tournament to fish -- with most competitors opting to fish earlier in the week; only 38 boats out of the 262 in the competition are eligible to fish Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | October 1, 2012
"Life's better with friends. " - Gyp Rosetti Like most men, Nucky Thompson dreams about bacon. Unlike most men, he also dreams about dead choirboys. Yes, the whole "assassinating your surrogate son" thing is finally starting to catch up to Nucky, and it's blinding the patriarch of Atlantic City from the chaos brewing around him. As an episode, "Bone for Tuna" belongs to the chief agent of said chaos, Gyp Rosetti. His one-man blockade of the highway between Atlantic City and New York has finally caught Nucky's attention, but his one-man assault on the English language and social convention wages on stronger than ever.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 25, 2012
Kids may be getting too much mercury from their school lunches, specifically their tuna sandwiches, according to a new study from consumer, health and environmental groups. The study found that the adverse effects from popular school lunch staple, canned tuna, occurs at lower levels than previously thought and kids should not eat a whole lot of the albacore kind. Parents should stick with light tuna only twice a month and once a month for kids under 55 pounds, which has a third of the mercury, according to the groups, including the Center for Science in the Public Interest and Physicians for Social Responsibility, Safe Minds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Canton Square is known for a lot of things: fun nights out, high-energy bars, easy access to Miller Lite. What's not on that list? Calming surroundings and top-notch Asian food. Shiso Tavern, which opened in June in the space formerly occupied by Cosmopolitan and, most recently, by Te Amo, just might change that. Owners Mel Carter and Brett Lockard understand what it takes to create a Canton-area hot spot: They're also the team behind Blue Hill Tavern and Tavern on the Square.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 15, 1995
It sure didn't taste like tuna from a can. It was storm-tossed tuna -- pulled from the roiling waters of the Atlantic Ocean as Hurricane Felix teased the Maryland coast. It was moist, had the dense texture of tender beef and a rich flavor unlike any I had tasted before.It had come to me over the backyard fence, a gift from a neighbor, Edward Marshall. Marshall, a Baltimore City policeman, shared both the fish and the story of the catch with me.He told me how he and a handful of fishing buddies ended up landing 15 tuna, yellowfin and bluefin, on a boat trip out of Ocean City.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 18, 2007
This is a new version of the tuna casserole Mom used to make. Instead of baking the casserole for an hour, I just sauteed the vegetables, mixed them with the boiled pasta and finished the dish under the broiler to melt the cheese. It's a meal you can make in minutes without a trip to a supermarket if you keep these staples on hand: canned tuna, macaroni, canned pimentos, Worcestershire sauce, carrots, onions and frozen peas. One item I find very useful is dried mushrooms, especially wild mushrooms.
TRAVEL
By Rachael Pacella, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
When it comes to dining, little things add up to make a restaurant great. That's why The Shark on the Harbor in West Ocean City is a good place to eat. They do a lot of little things right. They have handmade chips. Their dishes have little extras on them, like the seared tuna small plate with pineapple foam and a pineapple ring to help cool the spicy wasabi. They use local ingredients, and they serve local beer. They have really fresh fish, and they get all the spices right. The dining room has windows on all sides, giving you an awesome view of the commercial fishing harbor.
TRAVEL
By Jake Fewster, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Philadelphia Reopening of Rodin Museum After undergoing a three-year renovation, Philadelphia's Rodin Museum will once again be open to the public. The museum features some of the greatest works by the French sculptor, Auguste Rodin, including "The Burghers of Calais" and "The Gates of Hell" — a monumental piece inspired by Dante's "Inferno. " The museum reopens Friday, July 13. Admission is a suggested contribution of $5 per guest. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
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