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By From Sun staff reports | February 17, 2010
Forward Marco Terminesi, the leading scorer for the Major Indoor Soccer League's Milwaukee Wave, has been placed on injured reserve as he undergoes an examination for what doctors believe could be a brain tumor. Terminesi, a native of Woodbridge, Ontario, and the league's third-leading scorer, has returned to Canada for testing and observation. He has missed five of the Wave's past six games with nausea, headaches and symptoms of vertigo. He is eligible to return March 7. In a letter to teammates Monday, Terminesi, 25, said doctors believe he has a tumor on the pineal gland in the center of the brain.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 19, 2014
Researchers in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and begun testing a vaccine that can “reprogram” pancreatic cancers to potentially make them more treatable. Pancreatic cancer is among the most fatal types of cancer. It isn't often caught early and generally becomes resistant to standard chemotherapy drugs. This study was conducted on those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas , the most common form of the cancer and one that gives patients just a five percent chance of surviving five years.
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NEWS
By New York Times | April 23, 1991
Scientists are finding that at the core of nearly every type of tumor cell, whatever the organ of origin, lies the same terrible flaw.The flaw afflicts a single gene in the cell, a gene that goes by the humdrum name of p53. So nearly universal is the defect in human tumors that scientists are beginning to suspect that it could be an almost indispensable step in cancerous transformation.Other genes clearly are mutated in any given cancer. But while some mutations vary from one class of tumor to the next, a blow to the p53 gene could be a common denominator to nearly every malignancy, particularly the most prevalent and deadliest adult tumors.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a rare tumor that contained several fully grown teeth from a baby boy's brain. The tumor was found in the then-4-month-old from West Virginia in 2012 after a pediatrician noticed that his head was unusually large for his age. Doctors wrote about the findings in an article that appeared this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery could someday help researchers trying to cure diseases or grow new organs, medical experts said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 16, 1992
VATICAN CITY -- Surgeons removed a large tumor from the colon of Pope John Paul II yesterday and predicted a complete recovery, although it will take four or five days to determine conclusively whether the growth was malignant.The 72-year-old pontiff underwent four hours of surgery at the Gamelli Hospital in Rome. The operation included the removal of the tear-shaped, 2 1/2 -inch-long tumor and more than six inches of the colon. The pope's gallbladder, which was found to contain stones, was also taken out.Later, the Vatican said that the pontiff was awake and resting comfortably and was expected to remain in the hospital for about 10 days.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
WHEN VETERINARIAN Bill Benson lifted a 19-pound tumor out of Daphne, a 33-pound basset hound, ''I suddenly knew how the surgeon felt who lifted a record 80-pound tumor out of the stomach of a woman in India. The thought did pop in my mind at the time,'' says Benson, who described the tumor as the size of two basketballs with a very thin membrane and filled with fluid.The operation, with veterinarian Barbara Eidel assisting, took an hour and a half and was performed on Nov. 19 at the Reisterstown 24 Hour Veterinary Complex at 501 E. Main St. in Reisterstown, which Benson owns and where a staff of 26 keeps the hospital open daily around the clock.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
A meningioma is a benign tumor that grows from the tissue that covers the brain called the "arachnoid membrane." The tumor grows from outside the brain, not from within the brain. Meningiomas are usually slow growing and can frequently be present without causing any symptoms. However, if the tumor grows significantly, it can start to push on the brain and cause abnormal brain function. Dr. Neal Naff, chief of neurosurgery at St. Joseph Medical Center, discusses the condition and how to treat it. * Women are nearly twice as likely as men to develop these tumors, which almost exclusively occur to adults with peak incidence around age 45. They are the most common benign brain tumor in patients older than 40. They also happen more frequently to patients with neurofibromatosis, an inherited nerve tissue disorder.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 1, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University have successfully treated kidney cancer in a mouse by genetically altering tumor cells to boost the mouse's own immune system."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
SAN ANTONIO -- In the battle against breast cancer, doctors over the years have focused on one particular substance within the tumor cell carrying the descriptive, if not grimly ironic, name of HER2.Interest in HER2 -- its complete name is HER2neu -- has risen and waned over time as researchers first speculated that excess amounts in tumor cells could predict how aggressively a tumor ** would behave but then mostly discounted that notion.Now researchers are taking a second look at HER2 after recent studies suggesting that, rather than predicting aggressiveness, it may play a role in determining whether the tumor is resistant to chemotherapy.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2002
Every hospital in the nation could soon have a device that would show physicians immediately whether a cancer treatment is effective on a tumor, and if it happens, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel would have royalties for years to come. One of the most recent inventions to come from the lab - and one the technology office is trying hard to license for a commercial product - is an infrared imaging system that will allow physicians a peek inside cancerous tumors, showing activity level, density, size and whether cancer drugs are having an effect.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Through its partnership with the Friends of Jaclyn Foundation, the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team recently adopted, or "signed," Marquise Long, a dynamic 5-year-old boy with a smile that lights up a room. The foundation pairs children battling pediatric brain tumors with college and high school sports teams. The teams give these children and their families love, support and friendship as they fight the disease. Since its founding in 2005, the foundation has connected hundreds of teams with children throughout the United States and Canada.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 2, 2012
Those with type II diabetes are at two to three times the risk of developing primary liver cancer. But new research from the University of Maryland shows that a common drug many patients already take may prevent the cancer. Studies on animals show that the diabetes drug metformin may help prevent liver tumors from growing. Primary liver cancer is often deadly and is on the rise, according to researchers at Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center . The drug could benefit diabetics as well as others at risk for primary liver cancer, including those who are obese, have hepatitis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | February 12, 2012
Two years ago, the Student Government Association at Francis Scott Key High School came up with a fundraising idea that has bumped and spiked its way into an annual tradition. The third annual charity volleyball tournament, "Spike Out Sarcoma" will be held on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the school. The tournament features two divisions, A and B, to allow players with all different skill levels - from beginner to pro - to participate and take on the challenge of raising awareness of sarcoma.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
An Ellicott City obstetrician is accused of botching a woman's surgery last year, removing a healthy ovary and fallopian tube on the patient's right side when the doctor was supposed to excise a cyst on the left, according to a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The alleged mistake left Nadege Neim, 31, with diminished fertility and facing a second surgical procedure to treat the remaining ovary, her lawyers say. Last week, she and her husband filed a medical malpractice suit seeking unspecified damages against Dr. Maureen Muoneke of Women's Care LLC, claiming the doctor operated on the wrong body part, neglected to get Neim's consent for the removal of anything and caused damage to her marriage.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
The first tackle that Zach Lederer absorbed on the practice field this year was so violent that it left the rest of the Centennial High School football squad wondering about his health. But it was a hit the 17-year-old senior said he needed to take, to prove to himself that his recovery was complete from a brain tumor that could have killed him. "My teammates said, 'Man that was a hard hit,'" Zach recalled. "And I said, 'If that was a hard hit, I'll be fine.' It was a great thing because it got all of my fears out of the way. " Despite concerns from his parents and one of the best doctors in the world, Zach decided he wanted to become a full-fledged member of the Eagles during his senior year after serving as the team's manager.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
CT scans can reduce deaths by 20 percent in older, heavy smokers by detecting tumors earlier, according to results released Thursday from an eight-year-long national study. The study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and launched in 2002, aimed to see if the tests, which are more sensitive than X-rays, would affect the outcomes for those with lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the country. The disease was estimated to have killed 159,390 people in 2009, according to the institute — more people than killed by breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer combined.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 6, 1992
Working for free, surgeons at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a fast-growing spinal tumor that had paralyzed and threatened to kill a 12-year-old schoolgirl from Guyana, South America.The child, Ulanda McGarrell, is walking again just two months after her two operations, and she continues to regain her strength with intensive rehabilitative therapy at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital in Baltimore."May God bless everybody," said her grateful grandmother, whose name is Princess Rodney.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2008
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy chose to undergo yesterday's brain surgery at Duke University after some of the country's top medical experts disagreed with specialists at the Boston hospital where he was initially treated. Dr. Allan H. Friedman, co-director of Duke's brain tumor center, was among those who favored an aggressive attack on the tumor that triggered a seizure last month, alerting doctors to his condition, according to a Johns Hopkins physician who consulted in the case. Friedman, an internationally known neurosurgeon, announced yesterday that the 3 1/2 -hour operation went well and that his patient was talking and in good spirits afterward.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and Z on TV | October 7, 2010
Orioles Longtime Orioles umpires attendant Ernie Tyler was recovering at the University of Maryland Medical Center on Wednesday after surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. Tyler's son, Jimmy , said that the procedure lasted several hours and doctors told the family it appeared to go well. "Everything seems to be fine," said Jimmy Tyler, the club's home equipment manager. "They see no problems, but we'll wait until tomorrow for sure. " Ernie Tyler, 86, was taken to the hospital after experiencing dizziness and slurred speech at Camden Yards on Saturday afternoon.
SPORTS
October 2, 2010
Luke Scott was still hitting under .200 five weeks into the season and in danger of getting optioned to the minor leagues. But the Orioles designated hitter, known for his streaky nature, found his hitting stroke, and it carried him to the best season of his big league career. He was recognized today as the winner of the 2010 Louis M. Hatter Most Valuable Oriole Award, voted on by members of the local media who cover the team on a regular basis. Nick Markakis and Ty Wigginton also received first-place votes.
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