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NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 10, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- During the mania of tulip speculation that swept Holland in the 1630s, the rights to a bulb named Viceroy were sold for goods including six loads of grain, four oxen, eight hogs, 12 sheep, two hogsheads of wine, four barrels of beer, half a ton of cheese and a silver tankard.It must have been a pretty flower, and I wonder about it a little now as I dig in the damp November ground near the house, getting ready to plant a couple of dozen tulip bulbs of my own. Tulip prices have fallen somewhat over the last 360 years, fortunately.
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NEWS
May 8, 2014
We appreciate your coverage of the tulip beds at Sherwood Gardens but would like to offer some clarifications ("Sherwood Gardens: Pretty as a picture," April 8). Although we encourage the public to enjoy Sherwood Gardens and its picturesque landscape, it is not a public park and is not supported by taxpayer funds. The park includes Stratford Green, originally laid out by the Olmsted Brothers for the enjoyment of the residents of Guilford, as well as adjacent land originally purchased by John Sherwood in the 1920s to accommodate his tulip hobby.
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NEWS
By Denise Cowie and By Denise Cowie,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 16, 2003
Dispirited by the frigid temperatures? Desperate for spring? Try this antidote to the winter blues: tulips. Check out almost any florist, garden center or even supermarket right now, and you're likely to see these cheerful blossoms in cut-flower bouquets or growing in pots. January through April is prime season for such potted bulbs as tulips, hyacinths and daffodils, which are forced into bloom early to please the winter-weary. It's easy to see their appeal. Just look out a window anywhere there's a pot of colorful tulips sitting on the sill.
NEWS
By Mary Tilghman | April 29, 2013
Gardens were filled with tulips. Dogwood blossoms and tender new shoots were mulched. Windows glistened, tables glowed and chandeliers glittered in the April sun. Guilford homeowners were ready for the visitors who would come during the Guilford edition of the 75th Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage on April 28 - the kickoff to the upscale community's year-long centennial celebration. And come the visitors did - 1,973 tickets were sold. While they were admiring those houses and gardens, proceeds from the pilgrimage tour were helping to ensure another year of beauty in nearby Sherwood Gardens, where 80,000 tulips were in full bloom Sunday.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
Fast approaching the moment flower-lovers live for all year, the city's Sherwood Gardens -- and its 80,000 tulips -- is about to become a rhapsody in bloom."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | April 20, 2008
A stroll through Guilford's Sherwood Gardens on a warmish, sun-splashed spring afternoon is a perfect restorative from the cares and worries of the day - and a wonderful way to celebrate Earth Day. It seems to be the one place where even cell phone-addicted junkies gladly ditch their seemingly indispensable electronic appendages to take in the beautifully maintained gardens with their rows of colorful blooming tulips and daffodils. Azaleas, dogwoods and boxwoods, evergreens, ornamental trees and other curiosities are also to be found within this majestic 6 1/2 -acre - hard to believe - urban garden.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
Trendy is not the first word that springs to mind when you mention bulbs. Yet, flowering bulbs go in and out of fashion just as miniskirts and platform shoes do. For example, streak-petaled Rembrandt tulips were the hottest new thing in the early 1600s. Tastemakers paid the equivalent of thousands of dollars for a single bulb. They now cost about $1 each. Though the cost of flowering bulbs has gone way down and the number of varieties way up, the yen for the newest / hippest thing is unchanged.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 1997
Bulbs are the backbone of the spring garden. From the earliest snow crocus peeking shyly out from under a mulch of leaves on a late February afternoon to the luminous beauty of a Darwin tulip like 'Blushing Lady,' it is a rare property that does not celebrate the end of winter by looking forward to crocuses, daffodils and tulips.But why stop there?A wealth of other, lesser-known flowers also exist to populate the springtime. The astonishing variety of bulbs, corms and rhizomes can lend additional personality and pizazz to your garden, as well as an extended blooming season.
TRAVEL
By Lisa Alcalay Klug and Lisa Alcalay Klug,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
A Menton tulip is the prima ballerina of its family, its lush, waxy petals the color of a ballet slipper. It grows waist high and its stem resembles a performer's long limbs. And when it covers the banks of a pond filled with swans, its pink reflection dances on the water, creating an almost impressionist illusion.Of all the stunning varieties of tulips growing in Holland's Keukenhof Garden last spring, the statuesque Menton stole my heart. But it had lots of competition. Like a Dutch version of the Garden of Eden, Keukenhof boasts a cliche-defying display of premium tulips, along with select azaleas, hyacinths and other blooms, which are planted amid 80 acres of lush greenery every year.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
NEW YORK -- Ten blocks away from the acrid air of ground zero's smoking ruins, a host of volunteers placed tulip bulbs in Battery Park yesterday in remembrance of the thousands who lost their lives in the World Trade Center attack two months ago. These Orange Emperors, just a small part of the more than 1 million bulbs -- mainly daffodils -- given to New York by The Netherlands, arrived on a container ship last month. The gift, meant to lift morale and decorate spring in the city, resulted in an impromptu, monthlong daffodil project, attracting about 7,300 volunteers.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
An historic Anne Arundel County estate known as Tulip Hill was sold at auction this month to a mystery buyer for more than $2.37 million, according to Concierge Auctions, the New York-based company that handled the sale. The Colonial mansion in Harwood was listed for sale at one point for $7.5 million but the price dropped to $2.375 million before it was auctioned off on Saturday. Concierge representatives declined to disclose the name of the successful bidder or give the exact sale price, but they said the property sold for more than $2.375 million to a retired "senior military officer" who has restored another historic estate in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | November 26, 2009
I once spent a fall weekend planting 150 tulip bulbs, and not a single one emerged in the spring. Talk tulips with gardeners, and you will hear this kind of tale often. Plant them, and the dinner bell rings for deer, squirrels and chipmunks, rabbits, mice, moles and voles. There are ways to confound the critters that dig up tulip bulbs, or tunnel to them, and consume them for the winter energy they need, and those methods include everything from guns and poison to wire cages and stinky sprays.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | April 20, 2008
A stroll through Guilford's Sherwood Gardens on a warmish, sun-splashed spring afternoon is a perfect restorative from the cares and worries of the day - and a wonderful way to celebrate Earth Day. It seems to be the one place where even cell phone-addicted junkies gladly ditch their seemingly indispensable electronic appendages to take in the beautifully maintained gardens with their rows of colorful blooming tulips and daffodils. Azaleas, dogwoods and boxwoods, evergreens, ornamental trees and other curiosities are also to be found within this majestic 6 1/2 -acre - hard to believe - urban garden.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
The grand architecture, the history and the location put Tulip Hill, the 18th-century Georgian manor, on the National Historic Landmark list. Taking the name from its towering tulip poplars and its location on a rise in Harwood, Tulip Hill is considered one of the most distinguished early Georgian southern manor homes anywhere. Its five-part design makes for an impressive approach by land and water. The main hallway's M-shaped archway that looks like twin shells and the front view of the brick home with a cherub above the front door are featured in home history books.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2007
John Payne arrived at 6:30 a.m. - half an hour early - to set up, only to gaze upon the "Sooners," who were already filling plastic bags, wagons and buckets with tulip bulbs. The early birds have become as much a tradition as the annual excavation in Sherwood Gardens in Baltimore. "A lot of these are repeat people," said Payne, a volunteer with the Guilford Association, which sponsors the dig. "They start coming at dawn." By 7 a.m.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
Not everything is coming up tulips at Guilford's famed Sherwood Gardens. Sure, there are plenty of flower beds for visitors to enjoy - dazzling displays of pinks, reds, yellows, purples and blazing oranges. But something is different. Unlike any previous tulip season at this 6-plus-acre urban oasis, two beds lay bare and many more are sparsely blooming. Maybe 25 percent to 30 percent of the 70,000 tulips planted last fall didn't come up correctly, estimates Bruce Barnett, a Guilford Association board member who oversees Sherwood Gardens.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Tulips (above) and hydrangea petals (below) soak up sunlight at the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens of Baltimore. At left, horticulturist Sandy Reagan guides an Easter Lily toward the light.
FEATURES
By Marty Hair | April 27, 1998
flowerpower; it's tulip timeMaybe you and your friends are crazy for Beanie Babies. More than 400 years ago in Holland (the Netherlands), people went crazy for tulips.People paid big prices for these spring-flowering bulbs in the early 1600s - so much so that the craze for tulips got the name "tulipomania."Europeans picked up and expanded the popularity of tulips. Dutch settlers arriving in the United States brought tulips with them by 1640.Today, tulips are among the most popular and colorful of all spring flowers.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 25, 2007
A sylvan sliver in the unlikeliest of places, an urban luxury once criticized as a former mayor's extravagance and then neglected for much of its nearly 100-year existence, Baltimore's Preston Gardens is finally getting its due. The garden in the middle of St. Paul Street - which would more accurately be described as the city's fanciest median - is slated for a nearly $900,000 overhaul. The effort would not only restore the park to its former glory, but improve on it with a flourishing landscape, working fountains and better lighting - all in the hope that the hard-luck plot can become a real downtown park.
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