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NEWS
June 7, 2010
The article, "O'Malley to use tuition freeze as issue in re-election effort" (June 7) needs to be examined closely by the voters. Continued freezes make Gov. Martin O'Malley appealing to voters, but the voters need to remember the expenses like building repair and faculty salaries don't stop. They keep building, and the only way to pay for these items is tuition. I paid for two children to attend private school, and every year the tuition was raised. I didn't like it, but I accepted it. The cost of living was going up, and so did the tuition.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 4, 2012
Oops. Totally misread Kiplinger's chart. (Kudos to the University of Maryland, College Park for pointing out the mistake, even though the correction indicates the school slipped slightly in the ratings. Last year, the school ranked No. 5) Here's the corrected version: Kiplinger's ranking of the 100 top values in public college and universities lists 5 Maryland schools. The University of Maryland, College Park ranked No. 8 for in-state students, and No. 10 for out-of-state students; Towson University came in 76th for in-state, 81st for out of state.
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NEWS
June 14, 2010
The Sun's editorial ("Tuition Politics," June 13) giving Gov. Martin O'Malley a mere slight edge for freezing Maryland university tuition rates for four years over ex-Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who allowed it to rise by 40 percent, can only be interpreted as doctrinaire adherence to two-sided "objective" journalism. Common sense clearly states that keeping college tuition at zero growth is a great boon for the citizens of Maryland. It really helps middle class families especially, as well as poor and rich families who (as any Republican would argue)
NEWS
June 14, 2010
The Sun's editorial ("Tuition Politics," June 13) giving Gov. Martin O'Malley a mere slight edge for freezing Maryland university tuition rates for four years over ex-Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who allowed it to rise by 40 percent, can only be interpreted as doctrinaire adherence to two-sided "objective" journalism. Common sense clearly states that keeping college tuition at zero growth is a great boon for the citizens of Maryland. It really helps middle class families especially, as well as poor and rich families who (as any Republican would argue)
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley, who pumped millions of extra dollars into the state's university system to fulfill a campaign promise to keep tuition flat, is hoping the investment pays dividends at the ballot box later this year. But with voters concerned about their jobs and the economy as the nation tries to wrest itself from the worst recession in two generations, analysts aren't sure how much one of O'Malley's signature initiatives, the tuition freeze that will end this fall, has resonated with voters.
NEWS
By Jonathan Sachs and Josh Michael | February 23, 2009
As students who are directly affected by the cost of tuition, we believe it is important to explain why a fourth straight tuition freeze for resident undergraduate students at our public universities is so important for Maryland. Even with tuition frozen for three years, student costs have increased. Since 2005, mandatory fees for students (for parking, student unions and recreation services) have increased 15 percent; room, by 14 percent; and board, by 13 percent at the University of Maryland, College Park.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
There are probably people who are very happy that Towson University looks harder to get into these days than nearby Goucher College, but I doubt they include the 6,928 applicants whom Towson rejected for its 2009 freshman class. Not long ago it was "Towson State" and letting in nearly three of every four applicants. Now it is attracting more kids from New York and New Jersey and admitting only 56 percent overall. This fall's admission rate for the private Goucher, which describes itself as "selective," was 72 percent.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | March 11, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley warned yesterday of a fresh round of budget cuts to account for tumbling state revenue forecasts that are far lower than just three months ago, leaving a roughly $515 million shortfall next year. In an interview, the Democratic governor said a tax revenue estimate set for release today is "in essence sending us back to the drawing board" to craft a balanced budget. O'Malley said "it is my hope" to avoid state worker layoffs, and pledged to "do my best to defend" a continued tuition freeze at public universities.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 23, 2009
State officials are signaling that Gov. Martin O'Malley's hallmark tuition freeze at public universities could end soon as Maryland grapples with a budget crisis that shows few signs of easing. "I think the time has come to look at moderate tuition increases," said state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp at a Wednesday meeting of the State Board of Public Works, where $281.5 million in midyear cuts to higher education and other agencies were approved. O'Malley, a Democrat who sits on the spending panel, told her that many agree.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley, sleeves rolled up, perched on a stool in the Towson University student union Thursday, moments after the Board of Regents voted unanimously to freeze in-state undergraduate tuition for the fourth straight year. "That is quite an accomplishment," he told a group of students. Regents said they would have raised tuition by 4 percent, but the governor provided the state system with an extra $16 million to hold the line. The accomplishment, then, was as much O'Malley's as the regents', and he savored the victory yesterday in a year that has not always been kind to him. "Our state's future competitiveness, our global strength, depends on our ability to invest in the skills of our people," O'Malley said.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
The article, "O'Malley to use tuition freeze as issue in re-election effort" (June 7) needs to be examined closely by the voters. Continued freezes make Gov. Martin O'Malley appealing to voters, but the voters need to remember the expenses like building repair and faculty salaries don't stop. They keep building, and the only way to pay for these items is tuition. I paid for two children to attend private school, and every year the tuition was raised. I didn't like it, but I accepted it. The cost of living was going up, and so did the tuition.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley, who pumped millions of extra dollars into the state's university system to fulfill a campaign promise to keep tuition flat, is hoping the investment pays dividends at the ballot box later this year. But with voters concerned about their jobs and the economy as the nation tries to wrest itself from the worst recession in two generations, analysts aren't sure how much one of O'Malley's signature initiatives, the tuition freeze that will end this fall, has resonated with voters.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
There are probably people who are very happy that Towson University looks harder to get into these days than nearby Goucher College, but I doubt they include the 6,928 applicants whom Towson rejected for its 2009 freshman class. Not long ago it was "Towson State" and letting in nearly three of every four applicants. Now it is attracting more kids from New York and New Jersey and admitting only 56 percent overall. This fall's admission rate for the private Goucher, which describes itself as "selective," was 72 percent.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
The state university system is unlikely to raise tuition for the spring semester despite recent orders from the governor to cut $56 million in salaries and operating costs, said Chancellor William E. Kirwan. "I rather suspect that this cut doesn't rise to the level where the board would take that extraordinary step," he said of a midyear tuition increase, adding that the system's Board of Regents will probably discuss tuition at its Sept. 18 meeting. Instead, the system will order employee furloughs, eliminate open positions, shift money from its cash reserves, and cut student aid and maintenance spending.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 23, 2009
State officials are signaling that Gov. Martin O'Malley's hallmark tuition freeze at public universities could end soon as Maryland grapples with a budget crisis that shows few signs of easing. "I think the time has come to look at moderate tuition increases," said state Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp at a Wednesday meeting of the State Board of Public Works, where $281.5 million in midyear cuts to higher education and other agencies were approved. O'Malley, a Democrat who sits on the spending panel, told her that many agree.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley, sleeves rolled up, perched on a stool in the Towson University student union Thursday, moments after the Board of Regents voted unanimously to freeze in-state undergraduate tuition for the fourth straight year. "That is quite an accomplishment," he told a group of students. Regents said they would have raised tuition by 4 percent, but the governor provided the state system with an extra $16 million to hold the line. The accomplishment, then, was as much O'Malley's as the regents', and he savored the victory yesterday in a year that has not always been kind to him. "Our state's future competitiveness, our global strength, depends on our ability to invest in the skills of our people," O'Malley said.
NEWS
March 26, 2009
It doesn't take a college degree to question the curious math practiced by the House Appropriations Committee on the University System of Maryland's budget. If adding $16 million buys a tuition freeze for next year, what does simultaneously subtracting $21 million get you? These State House scholars would have us believe it means a tuition freeze and a balanced budget. But those who live in the real world, like Chancellor William E. Kirwan, know the truth: After enduring several rounds of reductions, the University of Maryland schools must either raise tuition or harm the quality of their educational program to deal with so big a hit. Mr. Kirwan's recent call to put a tuition increase back on the table is the correct one. The system originally envisioned raising tuition 4 percent next fall.
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