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By Chris Kaltenbach and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
A 100-foot tugboat sank off Pier 3 in Locust Point on Saturday night. The tugboat Kaleen McAllister sank before 10 p.m., Mike Reagoso, the vice president of Mid-Atlantic operations for McAllister Towing, said Sunday. No one was injured in the incident, Reagoso said. Everyone had left the boat by the time it sank, said Petty Officer David Marin, a Coast Guard spokesman operating out of Baltimore's Curtis Bay yards. "It is too early to determine what the extent of the damage may be, but the submersion of the tug is not expected to interfere with any harbor operations or any port operations," Reagoso said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
They are the handmaidens of the port of Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay as they scurry to and fro with all manner of arriving and departing ships and barges lashed to them. Their work goes on despite the weather and respects no clock or holiday. Because they work long hours, the five people in a tug crew grow very close. "Tugboats: those diminutive yet powerful workhorses of this nation's deep-water ports. We learn to love them as children, yet they continue to hold a certain fascination for us as adults," Capt.
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NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
A body found at Crystal Beach off the Elk River in Cecil County was identified yesterday by Department of Natural Resources officials as 18-year-old Justin Bryant, one of the two missing crewman from the tugboat Swift, which sank when it collided with a barge in the river Feb. 25. Bryant, whose body was discovered Friday by boaters in a shipping channel near Crystal Beach, was a deckhand on the boat captained by his uncle, William "Bo" Bryant, 44, of...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Herbert B. Groh, whose life as a mariner spanned the gamut from running errands on the city docks of the 1930s to work as a harbor pilot and tugboat captain, and who helped rescue and rehabilitate the Liberty ship-turned-floating-museum John W. Brown, died June 6 after a heart attack at the Catonsville Commons nursing home. He was 92. "I think he was one of a kind, or at least one of a very few," said Michael J. Schneider, a past chairman of the Project Liberty Ship project that guided the restoration of the John W. Brown.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 6, 1992
Jim Sadowski's Fells Point is a world apart from the Fells Point of designer bars and funky antique shops.The 61-year-old tugboat captain rents an old pier off the east side of the 900 block of S. Wolfe St. It's cluttered with maritime engines, pipe, rope and rusty oil drums. You can't help getting the feeling that if the tide went out too fast, the pier might give way and float to the Eastern Shore.Moored alongside the pilings are his Helen S, a 1942 tug that brought supplies to the workers building the first Bay Bridge.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Staff | October 15, 2006
Nearly a century ago, burning coal turned water into the steam that first pushed the tugboat into the city's expansive harbor. For the next five decades, the Baltimore was the flagship of the city's busy fleet of tugs - breaking ice, tending buoys and toting mayors, commissioners, businessmen and school kids around the harbor. Now the venerable steamer, one of the last of her kind, floats beside a pier at the Baltimore Museum of Industry near the foot of Federal Hill. Tucked away behind a green fence, the Baltimore lies a few hundred feet from her birthplace, awaiting what the museum and volunteers hope will be a major overhaul.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
It has to be the only tugboat in Baltimore with a clothes dryer vent rigged up to the smokestack.The Wildflower, a 55-year-old work tug that started moving barges around the Patapsco after World War II, is now docked among fancy yachts and sailboats on the Canton waterfront. It belongs to a dreamer named Brad Pumphrey and his wife, Jennifer, who have made it their home for about half the price of a modest Owings Mills townhouse."It's got a lot of character and it's going to last forever," said Mr. Pumphrey, 26, who fell under the spell of shipboard living on childhood fishing trips with his father.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2001
For generations, the pilots who climb aboard incoming cargo ships and guide them into the port of Baltimore often learned their trade while working aboard the tugboats that help muscle the ships into berth. Most trained as deckhands and tugboat captains for years before graduating to the elite title of docking pilot, a position that pays in six figures. Because docking pilots have authority over how and when tugs are used, each tugboat service maintained its own group of pilots loyal to the company.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
It was a hot day Friday, so the crew of the 115-foot tugboat Bay Titan kept its watertight engine room doors open as they turned into the east end of the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal near Reedy Point, Del. Those open doors cost the tugboat precious seconds afloat, and might have cost the life of a crew member who is missing and presumed dead, investigators said. Coast Guard investigators said they don't know whether the body of Steve Pollert, 45, of Suffolk, Va., is inside the cabin. It will probably take the rest of the week to hoist the water-filled tug from the bottom of the 35-foot channel without spilling its fuel, said Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Millard R. Hart Sr., a retired master woodworker and lifelong tugboat enthusiast, died May 11 of congestive heart failure at the Maples, a Towson assisted-living facility. The longtime Hamilton resident was 85. Millard Raymond Hart born at his family's Belt Street home in Locust Point. His father, James F. Hart, was captain of the tug A.G. Laun, and his mother was a homemaker. Mr. Hart demonstrated an aptitude for woodworking and he studied at the old Thomas A. Edison Vocational High School at Howard and Centre streets "I didn't have to draw anything," he told Jim Burger, a Baltimore photographer and writer in a recent interview.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
A 100-foot tugboat sank off Pier 3 in Locust Point on Saturday night. The tugboat Kaleen McAllister sank before 10 p.m., Mike Reagoso, the vice president of Mid-Atlantic operations for McAllister Towing, said Sunday. No one was injured in the incident, Reagoso said. Everyone had left the boat by the time it sank, said Petty Officer David Marin, a Coast Guard spokesman operating out of Baltimore's Curtis Bay yards. "It is too early to determine what the extent of the damage may be, but the submersion of the tug is not expected to interfere with any harbor operations or any port operations," Reagoso said in a statement.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Two large ships being unloaded at the Dundalk Marine Terminal in Baltimore shifted away from the berth where they were docked amid strong winds Wednesday night, snapping the lines tying them down and damaging a crane, according to officials at the port of Baltimore. The roll-on, roll-off ships, containing heavy machinery, farm equipment and other vehicles, are owned by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, one of the port's largest roll-on, roll-off customers, said Richard Scher, a spokesman for the Maryland Port Administration.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Millard R. Hart Sr., a retired master woodworker and lifelong tugboat enthusiast, died May 11 of congestive heart failure at the Maples, a Towson assisted-living facility. The longtime Hamilton resident was 85. Millard Raymond Hart born at his family's Belt Street home in Locust Point. His father, James F. Hart, was captain of the tug A.G. Laun, and his mother was a homemaker. Mr. Hart demonstrated an aptitude for woodworking and he studied at the old Thomas A. Edison Vocational High School at Howard and Centre streets "I didn't have to draw anything," he told Jim Burger, a Baltimore photographer and writer in a recent interview.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
The shipbuilding future of Maryland is 90 feet long and smells of Spanish cedar and fresh paint. Tied to the dock, with tradesmen swarming on deck and below, the Hunting Creek bobs gently on the Wicomico River. Within weeks, the tugboat with the gleaming white superstructure, distinctive green stripe and black "V" for Vane Brothers Co. on its smokestacks will be delivered to Baltimore to begin its working career. The Hunting Creek and its five identical sister vessels, each worth more than $5 million, are the first ocean-going tugs built in Maryland in nearly a half-century.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 17, 2011
Capt. Ralph Avery Kirchner Jr., a retired Baltimore tugboat captain and docking pilot who was a World War II veteran, died Sunday of Parkinson's disease at Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. The former longtime Arnold resident, who moved to Kent Island 20 years ago, was 84. The son of a tugboat captain and docking pilot and a homemaker, Captain Kirchner, who was descended from a long line of mariners, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. As a youngster, he often accompanied his father, captain of the tug Point Breeze, to work.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
T hey that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters; These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep. - Psalm 107:23-30 The last time I spoke to Capt. Allen Baker, who lives in Roland Park, was to hear of his harrowing experiences riding out Hurricane Katrina aboard the tug Joan Moran, which was moored near the Industrial Canal in New Orleans. After my column appeared last Sunday on preservation battles swirling around the cruiser Olympia, Adm. George E. Dewey's flagship that triumphed over the Spanish naval squadron at Manila Bay in 1898, and the United States, the fabled trans-Atlantic liner, whose 1952 speed record for an ocean crossing remains unbroken, my phone began ringing and my e-mail basket went into meltdown with messages from ship buffs, maritime historians, preservationists and those who simply had memories they wanted to share.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
A year after the tugboat Swift sank in the icy waters of the Elk River, the Coast Guard's report of the incident has not been released, and lawyers for the three companies involved are still collecting evidence for civil trials set to start early next year. It was one year ago today that the tug and a 520-foot freighter collided in heavy fog 40 miles northeast of Baltimore, about two miles south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The boat's captain and three crew members were killed after the 60-foot tug rolled and sank about 20 seconds after the crash.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | November 4, 1994
Coast Guard officials were searching for a missing man yesterday after a tugboat and sailboat collided near Cove Point in Calvert County, knocking the boater into the Chesapeake Bay.A state police helicopter was aiding the search late last night. The man, whose name wasn't available, went overboard about 8:30 p.m., said Petty Officer Joe Dye, a Coast Guard spokesman.The sailboat Lady Pearl was damaged but remained afloat. The man's wife remained safely on board, Officer Dye said. No one on the tugboat was injured.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Staff | October 15, 2006
Nearly a century ago, burning coal turned water into the steam that first pushed the tugboat into the city's expansive harbor. For the next five decades, the Baltimore was the flagship of the city's busy fleet of tugs - breaking ice, tending buoys and toting mayors, commissioners, businessmen and school kids around the harbor. Now the venerable steamer, one of the last of her kind, floats beside a pier at the Baltimore Museum of Industry near the foot of Federal Hill. Tucked away behind a green fence, the Baltimore lies a few hundred feet from her birthplace, awaiting what the museum and volunteers hope will be a major overhaul.
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