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By BOSTON GLOBE | January 1, 2008
Philosophically, one of the dangers is we've made debt a four-letter word. I wonder what it will do to a generation that will go to college without any personal sacrifice. You start taking loans away, and you start saying, `Here's a free ride.'" - LEE COFFIN, dean of admissions at Tufts University, who opposes the move by Harvard and other universities to eliminate loan obligations for students from upper-middle-class families
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
If your grades and SAT scores are less than stellar, you still have a shot at getting into Goucher College with a two-minute video. Starting with applicants for next year's class, Goucher announced Thursday that it will give students the option of submitting a video they record in lieu of transcripts or college admission exams. Officials say the move is designed to help those who might have difficulty navigating the complexity of the college application process. Though colleges across the country have allowed students to submit videos as a supplement to their application, Goucher officials believe the college will be the first to judge applicants primarily on the video.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 2, 1993
Jean Mayer, the chancellor and former president of Tufts University, whose work as a nutritionist helped clarify the nature of hunger and obesity, died Friday in Sarasota, Fla., He was 72.Dr. Mayer, who was elevated to chancellor on Sept. 1 after 16 years as the university's president, died of a heart attack while traveling to an airport from the home of a friend, said Gail Bambrick, a spokeswoman for Tufts, in Medford, Mass.The French-born Dr. Mayer earned academic honors, was a hero of the Free French forces in World War II, became one of the world's leading nutritionists and directed pioneering research into problems of poverty, malnutrition, aging and obesity.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Robert Lamont Tate, who founded two industrial manufacturing businesses and was a former president of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, died of heart disease Oct. 5 at his Sarasota, Fla., home. The former Ruxton resident was 89. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of William J. Tate and the former Mary Lamont. His father's family, who were of Scots ancestry, lived in Belfast, Northern Ireland. His father was a marine engineer at Harland & Wolff, builders of the Titanic and numerous other vessels.
NEWS
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | December 3, 1995
BOSTON -- At Northeastern University, officials estimate that in the past eight years the number of students involved in religious activities has more than doubled, to about 2,100.At Tufts University, a 10 p.m. Roman Catholic Mass on Sundays routinely draws a standing-room-only crowd of 350, an unlikely occurrence a few years ago.At Boston University, a gospel choir and ministry has seen its membership jump in the past four years from about 45 students to nearly 100.Suddenly, God is back on campus.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Robert Lamont Tate, who founded two industrial manufacturing businesses and was a former president of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, died of heart disease Oct. 5 at his Sarasota, Fla., home. The former Ruxton resident was 89. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of William J. Tate and the former Mary Lamont. His father's family, who were of Scots ancestry, lived in Belfast, Northern Ireland. His father was a marine engineer at Harland & Wolff, builders of the Titanic and numerous other vessels.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
If your grades and SAT scores are less than stellar, you still have a shot at getting into Goucher College with a two-minute video. Starting with applicants for next year's class, Goucher announced Thursday that it will give students the option of submitting a video they record in lieu of transcripts or college admission exams. Officials say the move is designed to help those who might have difficulty navigating the complexity of the college application process. Though colleges across the country have allowed students to submit videos as a supplement to their application, Goucher officials believe the college will be the first to judge applicants primarily on the video.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 27, 1996
You use it all the time. Odds are, you have more than one, since there now are more of them than there are of us.To most of us, it is simply "the remote" -- as in, "Where's the remote?" That's the thing about it: The only time we give the remote control device any thought is when we're trying to find it. Otherwise, it's just this little plastic box with buttons that we wave in the general direction of whatever it is we want to change.Forty years after its invention, the remote control has changed programming, advertising and even you. It has added firepower to the war between the sexes.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Across the country, the youth vote is down. Registration is low. Voter enthusiasm for Republican candidates has been lackluster. Unless that candidate's name is Ron Paul. The 76-year-old U.S. representative from Texas has energized — and gained —young voters at a time many people under 30 are turned off to politics. Paul's reputation for attracting young voters is so pronounced that supporters say it's sometimes rare to see older adults at his rallies. Many times, the folks in the loud cheering sections at his events are called simply "the kids.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
"There is a part of me that has a romantic notion to disappear," says Deepak Chopra. He could step hard on the gas in his BMW and just keep going, going. Yes, Chopra admits, sometimes even he longs to escape the responsibilities that come with being a best-selling author, New Age high priest and the human bridge spanning ancient Indian healing and high-tech Western medicine. "I consider myself somebody who offers the tools for inspiration," the 58-year-old lapsed endocrinologist adds.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 1, 2008
Philosophically, one of the dangers is we've made debt a four-letter word. I wonder what it will do to a generation that will go to college without any personal sacrifice. You start taking loans away, and you start saying, `Here's a free ride.'" - LEE COFFIN, dean of admissions at Tufts University, who opposes the move by Harvard and other universities to eliminate loan obligations for students from upper-middle-class families
NEWS
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | December 3, 1995
BOSTON -- At Northeastern University, officials estimate that in the past eight years the number of students involved in religious activities has more than doubled, to about 2,100.At Tufts University, a 10 p.m. Roman Catholic Mass on Sundays routinely draws a standing-room-only crowd of 350, an unlikely occurrence a few years ago.At Boston University, a gospel choir and ministry has seen its membership jump in the past four years from about 45 students to nearly 100.Suddenly, God is back on campus.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 2, 1993
Jean Mayer, the chancellor and former president of Tufts University, whose work as a nutritionist helped clarify the nature of hunger and obesity, died Friday in Sarasota, Fla., He was 72.Dr. Mayer, who was elevated to chancellor on Sept. 1 after 16 years as the university's president, died of a heart attack while traveling to an airport from the home of a friend, said Gail Bambrick, a spokeswoman for Tufts, in Medford, Mass.The French-born Dr. Mayer earned academic honors, was a hero of the Free French forces in World War II, became one of the world's leading nutritionists and directed pioneering research into problems of poverty, malnutrition, aging and obesity.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 27, 2009
I've heard that blueberries have a beneficial effect on the brain. Can you tell me more about this? Is the research recent and credible? James Joseph, Ph.D., at Tufts University is a leading neuroscientist and expert on the effects of berries on brain function. He has done a number of studies in both aging rodents and humans demonstrating cognitive benefits from blueberries. We see this research as highly credible (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Feb. 13, 2008). Joseph recommends frozen berries as an economical way to get the antioxidant potential of this fruit.
NEWS
By Linell Smith | December 15, 1991
Across a wide plain of Oriental carpet, a child in pink corduroy pants and candy cane turtleneck plays the violin. She plays the sort of music that leaves people momentarily helpless, that makes them remember things they once swore never to forget.Her 84-year-old teacher bends toward her, the lining of his camel hair jacket dangling, his hand trembling slightly."Hold that beat longer, darling, enjoy it," he says in a voice flavored by the warm, sheltering accents of Russian. Later: "Could you make bigger crescendo if I gave you a quarter?"
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