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NEWS
October 2, 2004
On September 30, 2004, JAMES IRVIN TUDOR; beloved husband of Judith M. Tudor; devoted father of Christina Lyne Knight, Samuel Tudor, James Irvin Tudor and Michael Anthony Tudor; cherished son of Mary Fischer Erdman. Also survived by five grandchildren; loving brother of Joseph and Vernon Tudor and Nancy Cutsail Friends may call at the family owned Bruzdzinski Funeral Home P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Ave, Essex at Route 702 (Beltway Exit 36) on Saturday and Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services on Sunday at 8:30 P.M. Followed by private cremation
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 10, 2013
The Governor William Paca Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, recently met at Tudor Hall to announce its new officers for the next two years. Jill Redding, who is also a Tudor Hall docent, gave a short tour and arranged a delicious meal. The program was a film about the Battle of Brooklyn on Aug. 27, 1776, when 400 Maryland soldiers fought and died in the largest and bloodiest battle until Yorktown and from which originated Maryland's nickname "Old Line State. " DAR is a patriotic lineage society that strongly supports the veterans, the Constitution and National Defense.
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NEWS
September 14, 2003
CHARLES H. TUDOR, SR., 80, formerly of Baltimore, MD, died on September 11, 2003, in the Laurelwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. He was born on April 29, 1923 in Baltimore, MD and was an 18 year resident of Elkton, MD. He was a WWII Veteran and received a Purple Heart. He is survived by a wife of 60 years, Marie Tudor of Elkton, MD, formerly of Baltimore, MD; sons Charles Tudor of Lutherville, MD, John Tudor of Baltimore, MD, Robert Tudor of Woodbridge, VA, James Tudor of Perry Hall, MD, Herbert Tudor of Middletown, DE; daughter Marie Kelly, of Earleville, MD; sister Viola Colburn of Charlestown, MD, eleven grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Tudor charm is in abundance at 711 Chumleigh Road in the Baltimore County neighborhood of Stoneleigh. Sitting on almost a quarter of an acre, this white stucco home is being offered for $889,000. "This is one of the finest examples of a Stoneleigh home that has been lovingly renovated and restored," said listing agent Ashley Richardson with Long & Foster Real Estate. "Such incredible care was taken to perfect every detail, down to the repointing of the stonework, the slate roof on the addition and the copper flashing.
NEWS
March 14, 2003
On March 12, 2003, MARY E. (nee Bennett); beloved wife of the late James C. Tudor, Jr.; loving mother of Debra A. Brandt, Karen Chaney, Bonnie Gorrera and James C. III, Michael, Steven Tudor, Paula Markowski, Theresa, Sharon Tudor and the late Mark Tudor; dear sister of Lorraine Wengert, Carolyn Wright, Gloria Blosser, Betty Eaton, Patricia Hines and Anthony Bennett. Also survived by 25 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends will gather at the Charles S. Zeiler and Son Inc. Funeral Home, 6224 Eastern Avenue (at Folcroft Street)
NEWS
February 21, 2003
JUNE C. TUDOR, 77, a recent resident of the Lutheran Village in Salisbury, Md. and formerly of Balto. died Sunday, February 16, 2003 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Mrs. Tudor was a daughter of the late Walter and Louise Callahan of Balto. She was preceded in death by her husband William in 1983 and a brother Ron Callahan in 2002. She is survived by a sister, Eleanor Fanara of Balto., a son Ed Tudor and his wife Louise and granddaughter Rebecca of Bishopville, Md., a daughter, Cindy Stamm and grandson Jason Stamm of Balto.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Jeffrey and Janet Plum are bona fide Anglophiles, though both were born thousands of miles from the shores of Shakespeare's "scepter'd isle. " Wearing their love for all things British like a badge of honor — or like the full suit of armor displayed in their marbled-floored reception area — there would be no doubt about the architectural design of their custom-built home in northeast Baltimore County. "We got a magazine with Tudor-style drawings," said Jeffrey Plum, a 59-year-old attorney who met his wife, Janet, when they were both working at Baltimore's Center Stage . "We fell in love with one of the designs, ordered the plans and put out bids for a general contractor.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBEST and NANCY JONES-BONBEST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2007
Jim Tudor Parking enforcement officer Baltimore County government Salary --$13.66 an hour Age --56 Years on the job --Two How he got started --Tudor retired from his job with General Motors after working there 33 years. Wanting to stay active, he took the job with parking enforcement. "I want to keep busy. This job keeps me walking." Typical day --Tudor works Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. After arriving at work he is assigned to a specific area in Baltimore County to patrol for parking violations.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 22, 1991
There's more to eating a la Henry VIII than throwing bones over your shoulder.Feasting in the era of the Tudors was -- for the upper classes, at least -- an opulent pageant of pure excess: trestle tables groaning under their burden of food, nobles with fur-trimmed garments and greasy fingers, pages circulating with pitchers of claret, hounds lounging on the rush-covered floors, gnawing the bones indolently tossed to them. Nobody worried much about silverware.As the 20th century draws to a close, we might look to the 16th for holiday party inspiration.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | September 28, 2007
Six years ago when Ryan and Elizabeth Hopkins were looking for their first home, they had a short list of requirements. They wanted a city neighborhood where the architecture was diverse, where the trees were tall and the neighbors constituted a cultural mix. Their hunt ended with the second home they saw - a brick Tudor in the Mount Washington area of Northwest Baltimore, just one mile from the charming village of the same name. "We were looking for a small-town feel, but in the city, and [close to]
NEWS
April 23, 2013
They came. They sniffed. They smiled. They sipped. They left - still smiling. That pretty much describes the behavior of guests at last weekend's Spring Has Sprung Tea and Garden Tour at Gramercy Mansion in Stevenson. The nearly 50 participants were split into two groups and each alternately toured the Tudor-style mansion circa 1902 and its gardens at 1400 Greenspring Valley Road. In between their tours, they all sat down together for high tea, which included, along with the tea, served on fine china, four courses of scones with Devon cream, hors d'oeuvres, finger sandwiches, truffles and petite fours.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
John and Leila Juracek's British friends tell them their 1929 Tudor Revival house in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood is more like an English cottage than the country cottages in England. The L-shaped exterior is of 18-inch-thick stone dressed in ivy and topped with a second-story, timber and stucco construction. Formal gardens grace the back of the home, while inside, leaded-glass mullioned windows with chintz and toile draperies, solid traditional furniture and needlepoint rugs impart a heady sense of living on the pages of an Agatha Christie novel.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
It appears something with a measure of logic has come out of the year-long fiasco wherein the Harford County Council's Black Box building in Bel Air ended up being vacated. Initially evacuated because of fears that the building may have been on the brink of a disaster, it later turned out a relatively inexpensive re-enforcement is all that was needed to shore up the building. And now the county council is poised to move its operations back into the building, returning the Harford County School Board's meeting room a few blocks away to that body and leaving other offices around the county seat a little less crowded.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | April 22, 2011
Even in today's real estate market, you pay a premium for houses that don't need at least a little bit of fixing up. Houses with "potential" can often be had at bargain prices. For an excellent example of what the right vision can bring to such a house, visit this year's D.C. Design House, which runs through May 8. Located in the Tudor Hills neighborhood of Northwest Washington, this 12,000-square-foot decorator showhouse nicely illustrates how to uncover that hidden potential — and the work of Bethesda architect Jim Rill and interior designers Patrick Sutton of Baltimore and Erin Paige Pitts of Gibson Island provides three worthy examples.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Jeffrey and Janet Plum are bona fide Anglophiles, though both were born thousands of miles from the shores of Shakespeare's "scepter'd isle. " Wearing their love for all things British like a badge of honor — or like the full suit of armor displayed in their marbled-floored reception area — there would be no doubt about the architectural design of their custom-built home in northeast Baltimore County. "We got a magazine with Tudor-style drawings," said Jeffrey Plum, a 59-year-old attorney who met his wife, Janet, when they were both working at Baltimore's Center Stage . "We fell in love with one of the designs, ordered the plans and put out bids for a general contractor.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
Gerry Bailey calls the 13-room Dundalk home her castle. The casual observer might view it as an enchanting woodland home from the yellowed pages of a Victorian children's book, complete with a turret. With the help of her daughter Amy, a real estate agent, she found a home that fit her requirements for a spacious kitchen. "I am a cook; I needed a large kitchen," explained Bailey, who runs her own business, Wonder Woman, which, among other feats of service to the public, gives cooking lessons.
BUSINESS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2000
Bob and Tracy Kean had no plans of moving from their home on Westview Road in Original Northwood four years ago. However, when the Baltimore couple saw a house that they really, really wanted they just couldn't resist the temptation to buy it. So, they bought the house, packed their bags, and moved -- seven houses up the street. The house the Keans bought is a 3,000-square-foot Tudor built in 1931 by the Roland Park Co. The Keans, who paid $150,000 for the house in April 1995, knew they would have regrets if they didn't take a stab at owning it. "We weren't itching to move since we had more than adequate space," said Mr. Kean, 50. "But we thought that if we didn't jump at the opportunity, we would always look at the home and know we could have done it better."
NEWS
July 9, 2009
On July 7, 2009, GEORGE W. STUPRICH, beloved husband of Alberta K. Stuprich (nee Tudor); dear brother of the late Oscar and Michael Stuprich and Patricia Malone-McGraw; brother-in- law of Dorothy Stuprich, Alfred and Janice Tudor, William Tudor and his companion Treva, Ruth and Charles Cordwell and Estell and Samuel Amos; dear friend so Melvin Anderson. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Saturday at 11 A.M. Visiting hours on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
July 9, 2009
On July 7, 2009, GEORGE W. STUPRICH, beloved husband of Alberta K. Stuprich (nee Tudor); dear brother of the late Oscar and Michael Stuprich and Patricia Malone-McGraw; brother-in- law of Dorothy Stuprich, Alfred and Janice Tudor, William Tudor and his companion Treva, Ruth and Charles Cordwell and Estell and Samuel Amos; dear friend so Melvin Anderson. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Saturday at 11 A.M. Visiting hours on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
It has been, said Robert Kean, a labor of love to restore the stately home set back from the road in Roland Park. The 1915 Tudor revival was in need of an overhaul when he and his wife, Kim Lacey, moved in three years ago. But the structure was sound. "The walls are three bricks deep," he said. Kean, who has rehabbed several homes, did much of the work himself, tearing out the office enclosure to reveal the patio, restoring original windows and landscaping the property. Keeping the historical integrity of the house, he didn't move walls.
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