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NEWS
January 18, 2011
I respond to your editorial "Tucson and mental health" (Jan. 16), not as a mental health professional, not as a citizen concerned and confused by the tragedy and deaths in Arizona last weekend, but as an individual who has struggled with mental illness all of her life. I am one of the lucky ones. Now almost 60 years old, I began treatment in my teen years and have been kept alive — I have thrived — through psychiatric hospitalizations, by taking medications, and with the help of psychiatrists, dedicated and expert.
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NEWS
March 8, 2011
In an attempt to capitalize on the tragic event in Arizona, the Maryland Legislature has decided that placing more restrictions on law abiding citizens who already must negotiate a labyrinth of complicated gun laws would somehow reduce crime. House Bill 330 seeks to reduce the maximum capacity of a firearm's magazine to the arbitrary number of 10 rounds. Instead of making us safer, this bill would accelerate the devastation of our economy by driving out local manufacturers, such as Beretta, who could no longer make magazines of standard capacity (standard capacity of a handgun magazine is between 12 and 17 rounds for most handguns and 30 rounds for the country's most popular rifle, the AR-15)
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NEWS
January 11, 2011
In regard to the piece, "After Tucson, don't expect sanity to prevail on guns" (Jan. 11) Dan Rodricks clearly demonstrates that he is a master of blame. What he hasn't figured out yet is that his words only serve to cause even more animosity. He writes of "toning down the vitriolic political rhetoric," but that doesn't seem to apply to him. He mentions the "soul-searching" prescribed by "the remarkably candid sheriff of Pima County. " Mr. Rodricks needs to follow the example of the one he has quoted.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
I respond to your editorial "Tucson and mental health" (Jan. 16), not as a mental health professional, not as a citizen concerned and confused by the tragedy and deaths in Arizona last weekend, but as an individual who has struggled with mental illness all of her life. I am one of the lucky ones. Now almost 60 years old, I began treatment in my teen years and have been kept alive — I have thrived — through psychiatric hospitalizations, by taking medications, and with the help of psychiatrists, dedicated and expert.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Like much of the country, I've been thinking about mental illness and civility in the wake of the shooting rampage in Tucson, Ariz., a week ago. Actually, I was already thinking about those things, given an odd experience I had the day before the attack, something that's been tumbling around in my head to the point that it almost seems like a modern urban fable whose lesson I should be able to figure out. I happened to be in Los Angeles with my...
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman | December 14, 1990
There are a couple of problems with a report from Tucson, Ariz., yesterday indicating that desert city is ready to become the spring-training home of the Baltimore Orioles.One is that the East Coast teams are moving out of Arizona, not in. When the Cleveland Indians leave Tucson in 1993, the easternmost team with headquarters in Arizona will be the Chicago Cubs.Another is that there have been no talks yet with the Orioles official who is overseeing the spring-training home hunt.Tom Daffron, Orioles vice president, said yesterday that he'd not had "a scintilla of discussion" with Tucson officials.
TRAVEL
By ROBERT CROSS and ROBERT CROSS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 19, 2006
TUCSON, Ariz. / / I went for the warmth, of course, and because Tucson's sprawl embraces classic scenery and classic places. The nickname, "Old Pueblo," hints at that. Yet there's a city here, too, with a bit of downtown arts culture and a university, both commanding space that might otherwise be taken up by yet another lending institution. After I arrived, I drove directly to a residential neighborhood only a few blocks away from the commercial eyesores that neighborhoods need -- gas stations, dry cleaners, convenience stores and fast-food emporia.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | February 5, 2003
AS A SIMPLE, straightforward, compelling plot, this women's sports story is one you'd have to pick over any of the others we've been inundated with the past eight months: Annika Sorenstam and her quest to break golf's gender barrier - if that is indeed the way we should spin this thing. Word from her International Management Group agent is that Sorenstam, who two weeks ago said she'd jump at the chance to play at a PGA event, may decide by the end of this week where to play. As an LPGA player, she must receive a sponsor's exemption to cross over to the men's tour.
NEWS
April 16, 2006
On April 11, 2006, JANE L. ALISON, 90, of Tucson, AZ; loving wife of the late Rev. Valentine Alison; devoted mother of six children, ten grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Mrs Alison was a music teacher in the Baltimore City School System from 1956-1976. Donations in Mrs Alison's name can be made to the Arizona Opera, 3501 N. Mountain Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
William Kenneth Barnes Sr., retired mechanical engineer and Perry Hall youth sports coach, died Wednesday of undetermined causes at his home in Tucson, Ariz. The Baltimore native was 64. Mr. Barnes grew up in Perry Hall and graduated from the Johns Hopkins University with a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering. He worked for 25 years as a mechanical engineer with Koppers Co. in Baltimore. A longtime community volunteer, Mr. Barnes coached youth baseball, basketball and football for the Perry Hall Recreation Council.
NEWS
January 16, 2011
As President Obama observed so effectively in Tucson last Wednesday, civil discussions of public policy at a time of great tragedy are an essential ingredient of democracy. While we may never know exactly what motivated last weekend's attack that resulted in six dead, "we cannot and will not be passive in the face of such violence. " One thing that has become clear is that the man accused of firing those shots in Tucson was seriously troubled and likely mentally ill. The warning signs surrounding Jared L. Loughner, from his bizarre behavior at Pima Community College to his disordered thinking revealed in notes and videos, seem glaring in retrospect.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Like much of the country, I've been thinking about mental illness and civility in the wake of the shooting rampage in Tucson, Ariz., a week ago. Actually, I was already thinking about those things, given an odd experience I had the day before the attack, something that's been tumbling around in my head to the point that it almost seems like a modern urban fable whose lesson I should be able to figure out. I happened to be in Los Angeles with my...
NEWS
January 13, 2011
Where is the outrage for the 200-plus violent murders that take place in Baltimore City year in and year out? Where is the national discourse on this crisis? Why don't we have a national moment of silence for each and every victim of these endless, senseless murders? Why doesn't the president of United States give nationally televised speeches for each one of these individuals and their families? Are the victims in Baltimore City and their families not as important as those that were struck down in Tucson, Ariz.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | January 13, 2011
Sarah Palin wasn't responsible for the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords last weekend — not directly, not indirectly. She's not even responsible for the ugly rhetoric used by others on the right who try to turn ordinary policy debates into clashes between Americanism and socialism. She hasn't tried very hard to curb the excesses of her allies, and that's a serious failing, but it's far from unique. Still, the Arizona shootings and their aftermath will probably be remembered as the end of Ms. Palin's chances of being taken seriously as a Republican presidential candidate.
NEWS
January 13, 2011
The politicians, pundits and public will debate until we're blue in the face about who is to blame for the tragedy in Tucson, Ariz., and like the political discourse of the past decade, there will be no winners. What is not debatable is the fact that if Jared Lee Loughner hadn't been able to purchase a Glock 19 semiautomatic handgun with four magazines capable of holding 33 rounds, there would be six fewer lives lost to handgun violence and 14 fewer injured. As long as our country allows lax laws governing the ownership of handguns, the American people must take collective responsibility for these deaths.
NEWS
January 12, 2011
Recently, the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) received criticism for not allowing a military veteran to attend classes based on his writings in an English class about his violent thoughts and desires to hurt others. The shooting tragedy in Tucson, Ariz., where the shooter was denied attendance at Pima Community College because of his unusual behavior, suggests that CCBC took the appropriate action in requiring an up-to-date psychological evaluation from the student before allowing him to return to campus.
NEWS
August 27, 2003
On August 25, 2003, WALTER HAROLD WOLFF, age 82, of Tucson AZ, formerly of Berlin, MD. Born July 27, 1921, in Bronx, NY. He was a WWII U.S. Army veteran and helped liberate Concentration camps, and was a member of the Jewish War Veterans. He was still involved with his military unit and former Comrades. He is survived by his wife, Irene Wolff; daughters, Abbie Stone of Tucson, Paige Mllando of Grand Island, FL; son, Ron Wolff of Atlantic, VA; brother, Lester Wolff of St. Petersburg, FL; six grandchildren.
NEWS
September 28, 2004
On Friday, September 24, 2004 SARA G. ROTHMAN (nee Weise), 93, of Tucson, AZ loving wife of the late Cy Bloom and the late William H. Rothman; beloved mother of Claire and William Geld of Tucson, AZ; devoted step-mother of Barbara Mosher, Doreen Silber and Fred Rothman; beloved sister of Jean Glazer and Selma Friedman. Also survived by nine loving grandchildren and 19 loving great-grandchildren. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday, September 29 at 10 a.m. Interment Mikro Kodesh-Beth Israel Congregation Cemetery, 6700 Bowleys Lane.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 12, 2011
It is almost impossible to miss the similarities — and stark differences — between Jared Loughner, the suspect in the Arizona murders, and Charles Whittington, the Iraq War veteran from Baltimore who expressed violent thoughts in a published essay. Saturday afternoon, authorities identified Mr. Loughner, 22, as the Tucson gunman. Soon after that, the news media started reporting details of his life in Arizona: He had been rejected by the Army after flunking a drug test and he had been banned from the campus of Pima Community College; officials of the school had considered him mentally imbalanced and a threat to other students and to faculty.
NEWS
January 11, 2011
In regard to the piece, "After Tucson, don't expect sanity to prevail on guns" (Jan. 11) Dan Rodricks clearly demonstrates that he is a master of blame. What he hasn't figured out yet is that his words only serve to cause even more animosity. He writes of "toning down the vitriolic political rhetoric," but that doesn't seem to apply to him. He mentions the "soul-searching" prescribed by "the remarkably candid sheriff of Pima County. " Mr. Rodricks needs to follow the example of the one he has quoted.
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