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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 18, 2012
Officials at the University of Maryland Baltimore County have a sent a letter to students and faculty confirming that someone on campus has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. The letter did not say if it was a student or faculty member who was infected and if the person contracted the disease on campus or somewhere else. UMBC and Baltimore County health officials, who are also working on the case, declined to give further details about the victim, citing privacy concerns. Tuberculosis is an airborne disease in the lungs.
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HEALTH
By Emily Mullin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Baltimore once suffered the highest rate of tuberculosis infection of any large city in the country - 75 cases per 100,000 people in 1966. Since the 1980s, however, the city has served as a model for tuberculosis control and prevention, helping to reduce rates of the potentially deadly lung infection to historic lows. In 2013, there were just 24 cases in the city, a rate of 4 per 100,000 people. That success, though, has meant that funding for the city's tuberculosis clinic has been slashed to about half of what it was a decade ago even as TB remains a stubbornly persistent health threat.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Over the past seven months, Jheri Stratton has been quarantined in her house for a while, ordered to wear a mask to walk her dog, and monitored twice a week by a city Health Department official who watches to ensure that she swallows a handful of pills. She has had to cancel vacations and explain to friends why she can't go out. Since the former waitress at Hooters in downtown Baltimore was diagnosed with active tuberculosis in November, allegedly after she and others contracted the disease from a manager at the Harborplace restaurant, her life has been miserable, Stratton said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
A student at Watkins Mill High School in Montgomery County has active tuberculosis and parents were told Feb. 6 in a letter that some other staff and students will be tested for the disease, though the risk of transmission is small. The letter from school and health officials told parents that the infected student is being treated and there is no additional risk of exposure. Those who need to be tested had classes with the infected student or an after-school activity between October and January.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
As op-ed commentator Richard E. Chaisson wrote recently, "despite the devastation that TB wreaks, it still is not a global health priority" ("Tuberculosis, the forgotten killer," March 24). Just as it was necessary to eradicate smallpox and combat polio in order to protect ourselves, we also need to step up global efforts to control tuberculosis. That's because any TB case is one sneeze away from spreading to someone else, and in the jet age that puts us all at risk. Until recently, it took five or six weeks to determine if a TB case was drug resistant.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 5, 1991
Q: Is tuberculosis a contagious, or "catchy" thing? Can you get it if you have sexual relations with a person who has tuberculosis? If someone does this, should he or she see a doctor for a TB test?A: Tuberculosis is contagious but it is not one of the diseases transmitted through sexual relations. The explosive problem of sexually transmitted diseases includes AIDS, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes simplex, chlamydia, lymphogranuloma venereum, chancroid, granuloma inguinale, condyloma acuminata (genital warts)
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 10, 2008
Mimi suffers from tuberculosis in the opera La Boheme, but in reality, there is little that's romantic about the disease. It is the second-leading cause of death from infection in the world (though not in the United States), says Dr. Richard E. Chaisson, professor of medicine, epidemiology and international health at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and founding director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Tuberculosis Research. Worldwide, the highest number of TB cases and deaths in recorded history will occur this year, according to Hopkins' Department of Medicine Web site.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 20, 2005
A commuter student at the University of Maryland, College Park was diagnosed with tuberculosis last week, resulting in letters being sent to hundreds of potentially exposed classmates urging them to get tested for the disease. No other cases of active tuberculosis have been found, said a spokeswoman for the Prince George's County Health Department. The sick student lives in another county; after the diagnosis, that county's Health Department notified Prince George's officials, who notified the university.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 21, 2002
ACCORDING TO Ed O'Brien, skipper of the charter fishing boat Semper Fidelis III, the column that appeared in this space last Friday was "so inaccurate ... totally in the extremity ... way out of perspective ... read by a lot of people" and now "killing" men who make their money by taking others out on the Chesapeake to catch rockfish. Captain Ed might sound a little extreme himself, but I guess he needs to go there to counter what he sees as an attack on his livelihood. Media reports that Chesapeake rockfish are infected with a disease called mycobacteriosis were "flat wrong," O'Brien says, and did equal damage to the bay's charter fishing commerce.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
The 13 employees of a Manchester landscaping company who have tested positive for tuberculosis were given chest X-rays at Carroll County General Hospital on Friday to determine whether they have an active case of the disease and what treatment they should receive, county health officials said.The Carroll County Health Department administered tuberculosis skin tests to all 120 employees of Martin P. Hill Landscaping on June 13, after learning that a worker there had exhibited symptoms of active tuberculosis.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
An article in the Feb. 6, 1964, edition of the Herald Argus and Baltimore Countian announced the arrival of a tool to help curb the spread of TB. Chest x-ray cruiser is now located in the 13th District, at 5424 Carville avenue on Thursday, Feb. 6 from 11 A.M. to 7 P.M. and at 1060 Maiden Choice Lane on Friday , Feb. 7, from noon to 8 P.M. Health officials recently reported that Maryland has one of the highest records for Tuberculosis in...
NEWS
April 1, 2013
As op-ed commentator Richard E. Chaisson wrote recently, "despite the devastation that TB wreaks, it still is not a global health priority" ("Tuberculosis, the forgotten killer," March 24). Just as it was necessary to eradicate smallpox and combat polio in order to protect ourselves, we also need to step up global efforts to control tuberculosis. That's because any TB case is one sneeze away from spreading to someone else, and in the jet age that puts us all at risk. Until recently, it took five or six weeks to determine if a TB case was drug resistant.
NEWS
By Richard E. Chaisson | March 24, 2013
This is World Tuberculosis Day, the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch discovered the cause of tuberculosis (TB), an airborne infectious disease that continues to rage around the world, killing 1.4 million people each year. The disease remains a leading infectious disease killer globally. In Africa, TB is the biggest killer of people with HIV/AIDS. Baltimore once had the highest rates of TB cases and deaths in the U.S., but a heroic effort by the Baltimore City Health Department's TB clinic, led by the late Dr. David Glasser in the 1970s and 1980s, resulted in drastic reductions in our TB rates through the use of directly observed therapy (DOT)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 18, 2012
Officials at the University of Maryland Baltimore County have a sent a letter to students and faculty confirming that someone on campus has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. The letter did not say if it was a student or faculty member who was infected and if the person contracted the disease on campus or somewhere else. UMBC and Baltimore County health officials, who are also working on the case, declined to give further details about the victim, citing privacy concerns. Tuberculosis is an airborne disease in the lungs.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Over the past seven months, Jheri Stratton has been quarantined in her house for a while, ordered to wear a mask to walk her dog, and monitored twice a week by a city Health Department official who watches to ensure that she swallows a handful of pills. She has had to cancel vacations and explain to friends why she can't go out. Since the former waitress at Hooters in downtown Baltimore was diagnosed with active tuberculosis in November, allegedly after she and others contracted the disease from a manager at the Harborplace restaurant, her life has been miserable, Stratton said.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | April 19, 2009
The Howard County Health Department, in conjunction with the school system, sent letters to parents at Oakland Mills High School on Tuesday informing them that a 14-year-old male student at the school is being treated for nonairborne tuberculosis. Health officials say the student was diagnosed with the form of nonpulmonary tuberculosis in February and was removed from the school while he received initial treatment. The student, who is noncommunicable, has since returned to school. It is unknown how the student contracted the disease, but health officials said Thursday that the student did not contract the disease at school.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1996
One of my close friends is extremely sick with tuberculosis, I thought that tuberculosis was easily cured with antibiotics and was no longer a major health problem.No single infectious disease causes more deaths than tuberculosis (TB).Throughout the world about 1 billion people are infected with tuberculosis; there are 8 million new cases and 3 million deaths annually. The incidence of TB in the United States had been declining for decades until the mid-1930s when an upsurge in cases began.
FEATURES
By STEVE McKERROW and STEVE McKERROW,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1995
For generations of Americans, tuberculosis was a serious health threat -- and it hasn't entirely gone away, according to a new PBS documentary airing tonight. Jay Leno also has international newsmaker Harry Wu as a scheduled guest.* "Maryland Connections" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., Channels 22, 67) -- This local production was made to accompany the three-part PBS series "The American Promise" (continuing at 8 p.m.). It profiles three individuals in this region who demonstrate grass-roots democracy, including a Hispanic immigrant who helps others in Montgomery County; a Columbia woman who aids people with hearing or mobility impairments; and a Washington man who has adopted troubled teens.
NEWS
By Carole Mitnick | April 3, 2009
China has called an urgent meeting that could affect your life, and it's not about the global economic crisis - or global warming. Instead, it's about a quiet global health threat that is more disturbing than you probably assume: the silent spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) around the world. Many global health leaders are in Beijing this week trying to draw attention to the danger, including Bill Gates, whose foundation has given billions of dollars to fight diseases; Margaret Chan, the director-general of the World Health Organization; and senior representatives from more than two dozen nations, including the United States.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
Baltimore has recorded the lowest rate of tuberculosis since it began keeping track of infection rates nearly two centuries ago, city officials said Tuesday. Last year, the city Health Department reported 32 cases of the disease, for a rate of 5 per 100,000 people. That's down from 47 cases in 2007, a rate of 7.4 per 100,000 people. "Thanks to an aggressive tuberculosis control program and effective engagement of community health care workers, the TB rates have steadily declined," Mayor Sheila Dixon said at a news conference at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, the site of a tuberculosis hospital in the late 1800s, when "consumption" was a top killer.
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