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By Sarah Kickler Kelber | November 22, 2007
It's time to get down to brass tacks. Tuba, baritone, euphonium and sousaphone players can gather Saturday to perform international Christmas carols at Frederick Towne Mall, 1301 W. Patrick St., Frederick. Registration is 12:45 p.m.-1:30 p.m., rehearsal is 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m., and the concert is at 3. Registration is $5. Call Patty Ensminger at 301-432-7121 or go to tubachristmas.com.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Baltimore resident Amy Klosterman was a piano teacher at the Baltimore School for the Arts for 15 years, but her involvement with a youth band in Uganda started with a journey unrelated to music. In the summer of 2007, she traveled to Uganda to do volunteer work. One day, while participating in a community event, rain forced her and others to cram into a tent. "I got to talking to these strangers," said Klosterman, 45. "I told them I was a musician, and they told me about the brass band.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 7, 1997
Somewhere in the city they call Baltimore is a small tuba, and we have to find it. If you see a small tuba -- "baritone" is the actual name of the instrument -- being carried by someone who looks suspiciously un-small-tuba-person-like, please take some mental notes and give me a call. We're trying to get a 12-year-old boy's baritone back, and it's not going to be easy.I'm in a jam, see. I told his momma I'd take the case (though actually the thief took the case, with the baritone inside).
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Marriotts Ridge senior Ethan Bannar is a big burst of positive energy. It's reflected on the soccer field, where he has emerged as a starting forward for the defending Class 2A state champion Mustangs, bringing a combination of skill and a tireless work ethic. He uses that energy in the classroom, where he maintains a 3.38 grade-point average, and there's plenty left to play the tuba in the school's marching band. For Bannar, who would like to attend James Madison and study business, a typical day during his senior year starts early and ends late.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
Leah Goldstein, 10, prefers the tuba to the violin."The violin is too perfect. People who play it act too perfect," said Goldstein, who lives in Pikesville and attends Wellwood International School. "Most tuba people have a sense of humor, and they fool around."And Leah, along with more than 200 other musicians, showed nearly 2,500 listeners just what the tuba and tuba players can do yesterday at Baltimore's 14th annual Tuba Christmas, held at the Inner Harbor. It featured mostly local tuba players ages 2 1/2 to 73 playing Christmas songs and carols from "Adeste Fideles" to "Jingle Bells."
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
Edward Goldstein was trying to save a few bucks Monday by shopping at a West Belvedere Avenue thrift store. But when he left the store, the professional musician found the rear window of his Oldsmobile van broken and his $10,000 tuba missing."
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
They peered from their hotel rooms, from the deck of the Constellation and from balconies up and down the Harborplace complex, people drawn to the sight - and sound - of more than 200 tubas and other brass instruments in one place. "It's fun and a little funny," said Mike Sohng, 25, who was warming up his baritone tuba just minutes before the start of the annual Merry Tuba Christmas concert yesterday outside the Light Street Pavilion. He said the curious onlookers "get something kind of strange.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
Edward R. Goldstein, a 43-year-old music teacher from Pikesville, has his beloved $10,000 Holton tuba back.The instrument was returned about 48 hours after it was stolen from his van while he and his family shopped in Northwest Baltimore on Monday afternoon."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Baltimore resident Amy Klosterman was a piano teacher at the Baltimore School for the Arts for 15 years, but her involvement with a youth band in Uganda started with a journey unrelated to music. In the summer of 2007, she traveled to Uganda to do volunteer work. One day, while participating in a community event, rain forced her and others to cram into a tent. "I got to talking to these strangers," said Klosterman, 45. "I told them I was a musician, and they told me about the brass band.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
With trumpets and tubas, drums and drum majors, students played into the night at Towson University yesterday -- no mere football halftime show, but the whole show.Hundreds of young musicians in marching bands from 45 Maryland high schools filled Minnegan Stadium with color and sound for the 12th annual Maryland State Band Championships, in a musical quest for trophies and recognition they might not get at their schools.Before an estimated crowd of 8,000, the bands formed and reformed in choreographed patterns, becoming circles and squares and rectangles.
NEWS
By Shayna Meliker and Shayna Meliker,Shayna.meliker@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Corey Hamilton's tuba is 4 inches wider than he is. The instrument measures in at 33-by-18 inches, and 10-year-old Hamilton is about 56 inches tall and 14 inches hip-to-hip. The tuba looks as if it's older than its musician, and the sound it makes is easily twice as loud as Corey's speaking voice. But none of that stopped Corey, a rising fifth-grader at Worthington Elementary School, from learning to play it this summer - so he could fill a much-needed chair in the school band. "When I started, these notes looked so hard, and I didn't know what buttons to press," the Ellicott City resident said.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2008
Andrew Spang knows his band students at Folly Quarter Middle School do not always listen to him. That's why he was looking forward to last week's countywide orchestra adjudication, where student orchestras perform for independent judges. "Sometimes they'll say things in just the right way," said Spang, director of bands at Folly Quarter and the Maryland Music Educators Association Outstanding Music Teacher for 2007-2008. He said that judges make comments on a performance and "they'll word it differently, so that it strikes home" with students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | November 22, 2007
It's time to get down to brass tacks. Tuba, baritone, euphonium and sousaphone players can gather Saturday to perform international Christmas carols at Frederick Towne Mall, 1301 W. Patrick St., Frederick. Registration is 12:45 p.m.-1:30 p.m., rehearsal is 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m., and the concert is at 3. Registration is $5. Call Patty Ensminger at 301-432-7121 or go to tubachristmas.com.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 24, 2007
What if the killers of today's mean streets knew they were taking the life of a Beethoven or a Brahms or a Rimsky-Korsakov? Could anyone take a life after hearing Scheherazade? If the shooter knew his action might deny the world such sublime melodies, would he still pull the trigger? In some cases, to be sure, music wouldn't make a particle of difference. I knew this even as I wrote recently that classical music might incline some toward less-violent problem-solving. Some readers were willing to consider the possibility, referring to the oft-heard quotation, originated by 17th-century dramatist William Congreve, that "music has charms to soothe a savage breast."
NEWS
April 4, 2007
South County concert -- The South County Concert Association will present the Bay Street Brassworks at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Southern High School, 4400 Solomons Island Road in Harwood. This ensemble features the trombone, French horn, tuba and a pair of trumpets. The concert is open to all members of the South County Concert Association and the Anne Arundel Community Concert Association. General admission is $20 for nonmembers. 410-956-4881, 301-261-5802 or www.southcountyconcertassocia tion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | November 30, 2006
OOM-PAH-PAH Question: What do you get when you blend the sounds of more than 250 tubas and euphoniums in one holiday performance? Answer: A Merry Tuba Christmas. And that's just what you'll hear at the Harborplace Amphitheatre on Saturday. The 23rd annual event features seasonal music and holiday carols from hundreds of tuba and euphonium players. Spectators can enjoy the holiday tunes while sampling hot refreshments from M&S Grill. ....................... Merry Tuba Christmas takes place from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the Harborplace Amphitheatre, Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2002
With an all-tuba lineup, yesterday's holiday concert at the Inner Harbor looked a little like a mistake in a band schedule. Only the brass section got the memo to show up. But there had been no error. Violinists, pianists and drummers weren't invited on stage. This is one annual performance - maybe the only performance - exclusively orchestrated for tubas. Called "Tuba Christmas," the concert has become a local tradition. Yesterday was the 19th time the tuba players have come together in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Go See The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe -- This movie - which conveys director Andrew Adamson and screenwriters Ann Peacock, Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely's love for the original C.S. Lewis novel and for moviemaking - has everything a first-rate fantasy should have, including sweep, color and clarity. Sun score: A. Syriana -- Writer-director Stephen Gaghan jams a diverse group of players inside a jagged-edged, radical-chic plot. George Clooney is an out-of-favor CIA agent, Matt Damon an international-finance whiz grieving for his son, and Jeffrey Wright a Washington lawyer ordered by his boss (Christopher Plummer)
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