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NEWS
March 15, 2011
I opened my newspaper Sunday to find a front-page article about the football lockout and how it will affect certain people and their businesses. But wasn't there a huge earthquake that just hit Japan, and didn't more than 10,000 people lose their lives? Oh, I'm sorry, there was a small mention of the quake just above a huge picture of man who runs a local bar, and way back on page 17… I am a huge Ravens fan, but come on! Wasn't the devastation in Tokyo a little more newsworthy?
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Smiths Detection developed the portable emergency room to treat soldiers on the battlefield. But the tornado that tore through Joplin, Mo., last month, executives at the Edgewood manufacturer say, showed another potential use. The twister, one of the worst in U.S. history, destroyed the main hospital in the town of 49,000, leaving no sterile place in which doctors could provide care to disaster victims. "We could have quickly deployed the system and helped people who had been hurt," said Tom Brown, the director of business development at Smiths.
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FEATURES
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 7, 2005
Comcast is offering its digital customers in Maryland free access to two South Asian TV news channels to help viewers track tsunami recovery efforts. The channels - TV Asia (Channel 665) and Zee TV (Channel 666) - are available through Jan. 31 to Comcast subscribers who have a digital set-top box and live in Baltimore City, Annapolis or Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford or Howard counties. After Jan. 31, the channels will revert to subscription-only status. Viewers with questions about access to the channels can call 1-888-COMCAST.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 12, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National • The gift that keeps on giving: Trump's crazy letter to Vanity Fair . (Vanity Fair)  • Orwell was so right about everything: Thermal cameras in Boston show too much . (CBS)  • Glad I went to private school: Chicago public school bans homemade lunches . (Chicago Tribune)
NEWS
January 23, 2005
Several Carroll schools have announced projects to raise money and collect necessities for tsunami relief. Projects include: Eldersburg Elementary School pupils are holding a drive, "America Sends Love," to raise money that will be turned over to the Church of the Brethren for tsunami victims. Pupils have been encouraged to think of others, sacrifice a personal luxury such as a toy or an ice cream, and donate their change. Containers have been set up in each suite for donations, and fifth-graders are collecting and counting the money on a daily basis.
NEWS
By DINDA JOUHANA AND RICHARD C. PADDOCK and DINDA JOUHANA AND RICHARD C. PADDOCK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2006
PANGANDARAN, Indonesia -- The blare of ambulance sirens sparked rumors of a new tsunami yesterday, prompting hundreds of jittery residents to panic and flee for a time to higher ground as the death toll from Monday's devastating wave reached 531. Searchers continued to pull bodies from the rubble in this coastal resort on Java as survivors returned to the remnants of their homes to see what they could salvage. About 275 people remained missing, authorities said. Some might have been pulled out to sea when the 6-foot wave receded.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
From classrooms to collection baskets, Baltimore parishes have raised $2.5 million for Catholic Relief Services' tsunami effort, more than any other diocese in the country has reported, officials announced yesterday. "They've outdone themselves," said Bishop Robert N. Lynch, chairman of the agency's board of directors. Cardinal William H. Keeler delivered two of the latest checks to relief service staff members at their West Fayette Street headquarters yesterday, and thanked them "for what you do for all of us across the country and around the world."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 10, 2005
BOSTON - There is a moment when nearly every astronaut looking out from the spaceship to the great blue Earth enters the same sentiment into the public travel log. From their Olympian heights, they see no borders, no countries, no demarcation lines to separate people. They report, in the cliche of space travel, that we share one planet, benign and awesome. Now we are living with a very different and terrible reminder of our membership on a single planet. On Dec. 26, following some geological timetable, the tectonic plates deep in the Earth shifted.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 25, 2005
THE TSUNAMI horror will fade from our national consciousness soon. Americans have such short attention spans. The worst of the disaster has already taken up so much of the TV time, with the nightly tally of the dead and the missing quickly replaced by the triumphant vignettes of hope and determination. The narrative arc is playing itself out quickly, at least from this distance. But it isn't that way up close. Chandra Fernando arrived here from Sri Lanka three decades ago and until a few years ago was education director at Baltimore's Montessori School.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - The United States' battered image has improved slightly in Europe, Russia and the Middle East, boosted by U.S. aid to tsunami victims and the Bush administration's focus on democracy in the Middle East, according to a 16-nation poll released yesterday by the Pew Research Center. However, people in European and Muslim nations continue to hold unfavorable opinions of the United States, and large majorities in most nations surveyed believe U.S. foreign policies do not take their interests into account, the survey found.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
Since the triple disaster—a 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and "nuclear meltdown"— struck Japan, we have been inundated with news coverage and a blitz of popular opinion almost around the clock ("Powerful quake and tsunami kill hundreds in Japan" March 12). Besides the deplorable rhetoric spewed by some radio figures and on the Internet, there is an undercurrent of opinion that Japan really does not need our help — indigent Haiti, yes; wealthy Japan, not so much. Nothing could be farther from the truth.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2011
Here where we live, far from Fukushima, we go about our business. The amygdala, the part of the human brain that worries about things, is not conditioned to worry about earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mid-Atlantic. We might worry about a snowstorm when the meteorologists issue a warning and the TV news operations go into panic mode. We worry about the effect of a tropical storm or an occasional hurricane; heavy rains create anxiety about the soundness of our roofs and basement walls.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | March 18, 2011
The National Cherry Blossom Festival and Sakura Matsuri Japanese street festival, held in conjunction in April, will be much more muted and heartfelt this year because of the disaster in Japan, officials of both events said this week. "We cannot just jump straight into the cherry blossom festival," John R. Malott, president of the Japan-America Society of Washington and a member of the blossom festival board, said this week. "We need to be aware every day of what has happened in Japan.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
For the first time since an 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit Japan, the Keio University High School lacrosse team can run in the sun and be boys again. Twenty-four players found sanctuary at Johns Hopkins' Homewood Field on Friday, escaping the trauma of the March 11 tsunami that raked the Japanese coast and ravaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. "They haven't been playing or running around on a field ever since the earthquake," said Atsuko Kuribayashi, one of three mothers serving as chaperones for the team.
NEWS
March 15, 2011
I opened my newspaper Sunday to find a front-page article about the football lockout and how it will affect certain people and their businesses. But wasn't there a huge earthquake that just hit Japan, and didn't more than 10,000 people lose their lives? Oh, I'm sorry, there was a small mention of the quake just above a huge picture of man who runs a local bar, and way back on page 17… I am a huge Ravens fan, but come on! Wasn't the devastation in Tokyo a little more newsworthy?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2011
Blogger Matthew Yglesias recently got the "Shamelessly Politicizing the Japanese Disaster" competition rolling when he demonized House Republicans with this tweet: "House GOP wants to slash National Weather Service budget, stop spending money on wasteful tsunami monitoring" -- as if, somehow, spending more money on our NWS could have prevented the fifth largest earthquake in history. Now that we've seen the first pundit break the ice, who will be the first major politician to shamelessly politicize the disaster in Japan?
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | April 5, 2005
DAVANAMPATTINAM, India - Grief has no nationality, no creed, race or caste. Grief is indiscriminate, expressed universally in the same way, a profound emotional disturbance that rises from the core and pushes itself out onto a face contorted by the weight of overwhelming sadness. Tears run down that face, and the voice speaks in a whisper or a childlike whine, no matter how old that face is. In the human experience there cannot possibly be a sadder event than the loss of a child. The grief it induces is practically unbearable, enduring and inconsolable.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 25, 2007
Blink and a restaurant has closed in Harborplace or a new one has opened. The latest opening is Big Kahuna Cantina in the Light Street Pavilion (410-539-7060) where Paolo's used to be. The menu is a mix of Polynesian and Mexican dishes, and -- no surprise here -- there's a huge selection of tequilas and fancy drinks of the little-umbrella sort. Do I need to mention the tiki torches? Paolo's (an Italian bistro, if there is such a thing) seemed to suffer being so close to Little Italy. The area's other Paolo's, in Towson (1 Pennsylvania Ave., 410-321-7000)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
They're poised to help, but how? The disaster relief agencies based in Baltimore, and those who donate to them, say they are ready to provide whatever assistance they can to the victims of the disaster in Japan. But for the moment, they are largely in a wait-and-see mode. "There is a role for relief efforts, for sure," said Bill Canny, director of emergency operations for Catholic Relief Services, one of several relief agencies headquartered here. "But right now, they don't need a team flying in. " Unlike some recent disasters, the earthquake followed by a tsunami and a still-threatening nuclear reactor emergency have struck a developed country with a strong infrastructure — from a well-prepared and well-financed government and military to experienced and well-funded relief institutions such as the Japan Red Cross.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
The earthquake and tsunami that hit northern Japan on Friday were natural disasters of epic proportions that left the country to cope with not one but two huge challenges. Many thousands perished under the towering waters that swept ashore after the first temblor and wiped away dozens of coastal villages. In their wake, millions more were stranded without electricity, drinking water, food or shelter, and communications with the rest of the country have been virtually cut off. Compounding the humanitarian crisis is the specter of an environmental catastrophe stemming from the potential meltdown of one or more of three nuclear reactors at an electrical generating plant.
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