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By LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN | January 26, 1997
WASHINGTON - The recent death of former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts from complications of treatment for cancer recalls how important it is for candidates for elected office to make full disclosure of their medical information.When Tsongas ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination the 1992 presidential campaign, he made an issue of his survival from a form of cancer known as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. But Tsongas and his doctors at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Ronald W. Takvorian and George P. Canellos, repeatedly said he had been cancer-free when he had not. In so doing, they implied that the cancer was cured when indeed it was not curable.
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Sports Digest | May 23, 2013
College baseball Towson nips Northeastern, 9-8, in CAA tourney opener Junior left-hander Kyle Paul earned his first save of the season by pitching out of a ninth-inning jam as Towson advanced to the second round of the Colonial Athletic Association baseball tournament with a 9-8 victory over Northeastern (28-25) in Harrisonburg, Va., on Wednesday afternoon. The victory marked the first time since joining the CAA in 2002 that Towson (26-28) has won its tournament opener.
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NEWS
March 1, 1992
Maryland Democrats can play a pivotal role in the selection of their party's presidential nominee this year if, but only if, they vote for former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts. Seeking preeminence for our state is hardly justification for so important a decision. But when the chance to make a difference nationally coincides with a decided preference for one candidate -- and The Sun has such a preference for Mr. Tsongas -- then a strong endorsement is in order.Mr. Tsongas brings to the campaign a refreshing zest for hard truths and realism, a merited contempt for political packaging or straddling and a tough willingness to challenge the kind of Democratic orthodoxy that has led his party to defeat after defeat.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 26, 2000
MANCHESTER, N.H. -- The seven surviving presidential candidates converged yesterday on New Hampshire for debates tonight that will give them their last chance to make an impression on the Republicans and Democrats who will vote in the state's primaries next Tuesday. Seeking to either exploit or atone for their performances in the Iowa precinct caucuses, several of the candidates kept to frantic campaign schedules despite a snowstorm that closed schools and airports and snarled traffic.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | September 6, 1991
Democratic presidential candidate Paul E. Tsongas motioned toward a dried flower arrangement on a small table.The action came during his talk about the tough task of translating his 85-page pamphlet of economic ideas into 30-second campaign commercials. The television ads are so good, he promised, that viewers will be unable to forget them."If you don't remember those ads," the former Massachusetts senator chirped in Annapolis yesterday, "I'll eat those flowers."But, in one of those self-deprecating moments that could become the saving grace of a candidate steeped in intellectual thought and dry rhetoric, Tsongas turned to an aide and quickly added: "Can we get these flowers out of here now?"
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1991
LOWELL, Mass. -- The late-starting 1992 presidential contest got baptized in a steady downpour yesterday as former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas became the first candidate to formally enter the race.His announcement speech, in a rain-soaked park in this restored red-brick mill town, struck themes of economic renewal that the Democrats are likely to employ against President Bush in next year's campaign, especially if the current recession continues into 1992.In launching his underdog candidacy, Mr. Tsongas (pronounced SONG-us)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 21, 1992
Former Sen. Paul T. Tsongas, whose successful fight against lymph cancer became a symbol of strength in his failed bid for the Democratic presidential nomination, will help launch a campaign today aimed at raising public awareness about the benefits of medical research.Mr. Tsongas will be the keynote speaker at the Maryland Science Center, where a national not-for-profit organization called Research!America will begin a two-week campaign of educational programs in Maryland schools, libraries and health care institutions.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 4, 1991
NASHUA, N.H. -- Paul E. Tsongas, the only announced major Democratic candidate in the 1992 presidential race, has decided to concentrate on the New Hampshire primary instead of the Iowa caucuses.The shift was revealed last week when Mr. Tsongas' Iowa field director, Emily Smith, announced her resignation. She said that the Iowa race had changed because Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin would probably run. Mr. Tsongas changed strategies, she said, because Mr. Harkin could win "90 percent of the vote" in the Iowa caucuses.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1993
Former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts was admitted to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston yesterday for further treatment of lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, officials of the hospital said.Mr. Tsongas, a Democratic Party presidential candidate last year, was reported in good condition. He entered the hospital for monitoring of the chemotherapy he is receiving in his latest battle against lymphoma.Mr. Tsongas, 51, said in a statement that he had asked Dana-Farber officials not to issue further statements about his condition until the treatment is completed.
NEWS
By Robert A. Jordan | May 27, 1999
IN NEW Hampshire, the candidacy of presidential hopeful Bill Bradley in 1999 is looking more like the candidacy of Paul Tsongas in 1991 -- with a few key exceptions.Vice President Al Gore, the acknowledged front-runner for the Democratic nomination, would be wise to familiarize himself with the surprise victory Tsongas pulled off in the New Hampshire primary in 1992. If Mr. Gore did, he might take Mr. Bradley a little more seriously.The little-known advantage that Tsongas, the former U.S. senator from Massachusetts who died in 1997, had eight years ago is basically the same advantage Mr. Bradley will have in the 2000 primary: He's considered a long-shot (a special appeal to voters seeking a fiscally conservative liberal)
NEWS
By Robert A. Jordan | May 27, 1999
IN NEW Hampshire, the candidacy of presidential hopeful Bill Bradley in 1999 is looking more like the candidacy of Paul Tsongas in 1991 -- with a few key exceptions.Vice President Al Gore, the acknowledged front-runner for the Democratic nomination, would be wise to familiarize himself with the surprise victory Tsongas pulled off in the New Hampshire primary in 1992. If Mr. Gore did, he might take Mr. Bradley a little more seriously.The little-known advantage that Tsongas, the former U.S. senator from Massachusetts who died in 1997, had eight years ago is basically the same advantage Mr. Bradley will have in the 2000 primary: He's considered a long-shot (a special appeal to voters seeking a fiscally conservative liberal)
NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON | February 23, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - If President John F. Kennedy's Addison's disease and addiction to painkillers had been known, he probably wouldn't have been elected in 1960. If former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas had been elected president in 1992, he would have died two days before the end of his term.JFK's ailments were hidden from the electorate, however, and he was depicted as a vigorous athletic man with only a sore back.Tsongas, who died Jan. 18, announced during the campaign that he had had non-Hodgkins lymphoma but he and his doctors said he had beaten it. The cancer is incurable, however, and Tsongas admitted later that he had concealed its recurrence.
NEWS
By Jeff Jacoby | January 29, 1997
Liberal round pegs no longer fit into the square realities of our world, and the conservative square pegs prevailed.-- Paul E. Tsongas, ''The Road From Here'' (1981) BOSTON -- Paul Tsongas was a remarkable man, and his untimely death January 18 unleashed a flood of memories and appreciations. In the obituaries last week and in the recollections of those who knew him, there were tributes aplenty: To his courageous fight with cancer. To his fierce pride in his hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts.
NEWS
By LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN | January 26, 1997
WASHINGTON - The recent death of former Sen. Paul E. Tsongas of Massachusetts from complications of treatment for cancer recalls how important it is for candidates for elected office to make full disclosure of their medical information.When Tsongas ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic nomination the 1992 presidential campaign, he made an issue of his survival from a form of cancer known as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. But Tsongas and his doctors at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Ronald W. Takvorian and George P. Canellos, repeatedly said he had been cancer-free when he had not. In so doing, they implied that the cancer was cured when indeed it was not curable.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- There was appropriate irony in the fact that when Paul Tsongas died the other day at 55 the political focus was on the second inaugural of President Clinton. It was not the first time the expansive politician from Arkansas had overshadowed Mr. Tsongas.He should not be allowed to pass into political history, however, without more attention being paid. He was one of those rare politicians who had a significant influence on the national debate without ever holding a significant center of national power.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The so-called Gang of Eight -- those maverick office holders and former presidential candidates exploring the possibility of an independent campaign -- is being greeted by the political community here with skepticism bordering on derision.They are, the conventional wisdom goes, has-beens, never-weres and want-to-bes who have personal axes to grind. The chances of them advancing an independent candidate deserving serious attention, it is said, are slim and none.There is, of course, some validity in this critique.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau | February 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Democratic presidential candidate Paul E. Tsongas was endorsed yesterday by Maryland's leading environmentalists, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and a 6-year-old named Stella Pelekanos.The support from the environmentalists and the governor was expected, but the appearance by Stella was a bonus.Mr. Tsongas was in the midst of a brief speech here at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel when he noticed the restless child in the front row."Does she want to come up here?" he asked the girl's aunt.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith B | November 19, 1991
Democratic presidential hopeful Paul E. Tsongas came to Maryland yesterday and joked that he was responsible for President Bush's slide in the polls.George Bush had a 91 percent approval rating last March when the former U.S. senator from Massachusetts entered the race for his party's presidential nomination -- but by yesterday the Republican president had slipped to 55 percent."
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | January 15, 1995
In case you missed it, the Republicans in Maryland won last year's election. Not the contest for state elective offices necessarily, but the contest of ideas.Sure, Republican Ellen Sauerbrey lost the race for governor -- though she's still in a state of denial. Yet look at the distinctly rightward path her Democratic opponent has followed ever since then.Sure, Republicans remain a minority in the Maryland General Assembly. Yet look at the House leadership's conservative agenda.A marked change has taken place in the state's Democratic Party.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
SILVER SPRING -- Patrick J. Smith, the Montgomery County lawyer who ran Paul E. Tsongas' victorious Maryland Democratic presidential primary race in 1992, last night officially kicked off his campaign for state attorney general."
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