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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 28, 1998
BEIJING -- In cities across China today, middle-aged laid-off state factory workers who were once the backbone of the nation's socialist economy sit along the sidewalks peddling everything from bicycle bells to binoculars.Briskly passing them by -- literally and figuratively -- are the country's increasing number of the nouveau riche, busily chatting on cell phones and embracing the materialism Mao Tse-tung deplored.Perhaps no place in this city better captures the transition from communism to a more market-oriented economy than the main boulevard, the Avenue of Eternal Peace, in a section that stretches from Tiananmen Square to the China World Trade Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2003
Apple CEO Steve Jobs and Ben and Jerry of super-fattening-ice-cream fame weren't the first guerrilla marketers, insists author Gabriel Stricker. As he puts it, "Mao -- the original 'Chairman' of the board -- beat you to the punch years ago." So what if Communist Party chairman Mao Tse-tung, the former head of China, wasn't a capitalist at heart? He knew how to win battles as an underdog, Stricker writes. In his new book, Mao in the Boardroom (St. Martin's Press, $14.95), out this past week, Stricker lays out Mao's theories, then describes how capitalist warriors apply them on the corporate battlefield today.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 1998
NANJIE, China -- If Walt Disney's Epcot Center ever adds a "Mao World," it will probably look a lot like Nanjie, a surrealistic village where people live in identical apartments with the same ,, blond-wood coffee tables and 21-inch-screen TVs.The villagers, who work in collectively owned factories, begin their mornings singing socialist songs, earn a paltry $7.50 for a seven-day work week and are forbidden to dance or hold hands in public.Sound like hell? Li Guobing doesn't think so."I like the town," says Li, a 24-year-old salesman, who misses the paternalism and stability of China's old socialist system and cheerfully sings a few bars of the Cultural Revolution anthem, "The East is Red," upon request.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 2001
BEIJING - The collision last Sunday between U.S. and Chinese military planes has touched a nationalistic nerve here, fueling resentment toward what many see as the United States' arrogant use of power and frustration with China's own relative weakness. As U.S. officials met yesterday for a second time with 24 crew members held in China's southern island of Hainan, people on the streets of Beijing continued to seethe with anger toward the United States, demanding an unconditional apology and compensation.
NEWS
September 26, 1995
Diana Chin Hsu, a journalist, best-selling author and the widow of Chiang Kai-shek's secret police chief, died Wednesday of stomach cancer at her home in New York. She was 77.Ms. Hsu covered Japan's war against China during World War II, then escaped to Taiwan with the youngest three of her eight children shortly after Mao Tse-tung's Communist takeover.Her husband, Mo Tze Shin, was executed by the Communists in 1951, and Ms. Hsu's book, "Mao Tse-tung Killed My Husband," was a best seller in Asia.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 27, 1993
BEIJING -- On the 100th anniversary of Mao Tse-tung's birth, President Jiang Zemin yesterday called on the Chinese people to remember the late leader as a national hero who nevertheless made many grave mistakes that the country's current leadership is still trying to rectify.Mr. Jiang's nationally televised speech at the Great Hall of the People first praised Mao and then diminished him, casting paramount leader Deng Xiaoping as the man who saved China from Mao's errors. Mr. Deng, 89 and believed to be ailing, did not appear in public to acknowledge the anniversary.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
BEIJING -- It may seem strange now, but Mao Tse-tung and the Cultural Revolution used to be chic in the 1960s and 1970s.The young protest generation in the West latched onto Mao's slogans as proof that another, better way existed to run a country.The "Thoughts of Mao" -- a collection of sophistry and slogans -- helped fuel protests around the world. It was translated into dozens of languages and published in a famous "little red book."Other terms from Mao's era entered popular Western culture, where they remain today, including:"Great Leap Forward," the name of a catastrophic economic campaign in the late 1950s that resulted in widespread famine.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
LI Zhisui, 75, the personal doctor of Mao Tse-tung whose recently published memoirs portrayed the Chinese leader as a manipulative egomaniac with little tolerance of dissent and scant care for hygiene, died Tuesday of an apparent heart attack at his home in suburban Chicago. He was little known outside China until his book, "The Private Life of Chairman Mao: The Memoirs of Mao's Personal Physician," was published last October. The book included sometimes-racy anecdotes and unusual insights into the workings of the upper echelons of the Chinese government.
NEWS
December 26, 1993
Few individuals have dominated their times as completely as the son of a Chinese peasant born 100 days ago today. Contemporary China of more than one billion souls is the China Mao Tse-tung made. His successors are trying to undo his damage while holding on to the legitimacy he conferred upon them.Whether the Communists represented China's truest revolution or just another dynasty is for Sinologists to debate. For certain the small Communist Party the librarian Mao helped found in 1920 subverted the revolution of 1911, survived the Long March of 1934, withstood the Japanese in the 1930s and 1940s from a cave in Yenan and triumphed in 1949.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 5, 1997
BEIJING -- The massive stone mausoleum containing the preserved body of Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung closed this week for repairs that officials said will take at least eight months.But will it reopen? And if so, will it be moved from its dominant position in Tiananmen Square?The committee responsible for the mausoleum -- where Mao's flag-draped body has rested in a crystal sarcophagus since 1977 -- insists that the refurbished tomb will reopen early next year.But as the cultist fervor of the Mao era recedes in a country that is now run more by committee than by charisma, some have suggested that it might be a good time to make a symbolic break with China's troubled revolutionary past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff | January 18, 2000
"Mao: A Life," by Philip Short. Henry Holt and Co. 784 pages. $35. By any measure, Mao Tse-tung ranks as one of the great killers of the 20th century. Two of his worst policies, the Great Leap Forward (1958-1961) and the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), cost China an estimated 30 million lives or more. And yet, on weekday mornings in Tiananmen Square, thousands of people from across the country stand in line to catch a glimpse of the Great Helmsman inside his crystal sarcophagus. Given the havoc Mao wrought, it would be easy to assume that all those tourists are simply checking to make sure he's still dead.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 1998
NANJIE, China -- If Walt Disney's Epcot Center ever adds a "Mao World," it will probably look a lot like Nanjie, a surrealistic village where people live in identical apartments with the same ,, blond-wood coffee tables and 21-inch-screen TVs.The villagers, who work in collectively owned factories, begin their mornings singing socialist songs, earn a paltry $7.50 for a seven-day work week and are forbidden to dance or hold hands in public.Sound like hell? Li Guobing doesn't think so."I like the town," says Li, a 24-year-old salesman, who misses the paternalism and stability of China's old socialist system and cheerfully sings a few bars of the Cultural Revolution anthem, "The East is Red," upon request.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 28, 1998
BEIJING -- In cities across China today, middle-aged laid-off state factory workers who were once the backbone of the nation's socialist economy sit along the sidewalks peddling everything from bicycle bells to binoculars.Briskly passing them by -- literally and figuratively -- are the country's increasing number of the nouveau riche, busily chatting on cell phones and embracing the materialism Mao Tse-tung deplored.Perhaps no place in this city better captures the transition from communism to a more market-oriented economy than the main boulevard, the Avenue of Eternal Peace, in a section that stretches from Tiananmen Square to the China World Trade Center.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 5, 1997
BEIJING -- The massive stone mausoleum containing the preserved body of Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung closed this week for repairs that officials said will take at least eight months.But will it reopen? And if so, will it be moved from its dominant position in Tiananmen Square?The committee responsible for the mausoleum -- where Mao's flag-draped body has rested in a crystal sarcophagus since 1977 -- insists that the refurbished tomb will reopen early next year.But as the cultist fervor of the Mao era recedes in a country that is now run more by committee than by charisma, some have suggested that it might be a good time to make a symbolic break with China's troubled revolutionary past.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
BEIJING -- It may seem strange now, but Mao Tse-tung and the Cultural Revolution used to be chic in the 1960s and 1970s.The young protest generation in the West latched onto Mao's slogans as proof that another, better way existed to run a country.The "Thoughts of Mao" -- a collection of sophistry and slogans -- helped fuel protests around the world. It was translated into dozens of languages and published in a famous "little red book."Other terms from Mao's era entered popular Western culture, where they remain today, including:"Great Leap Forward," the name of a catastrophic economic campaign in the late 1950s that resulted in widespread famine.
NEWS
September 26, 1995
Diana Chin Hsu, a journalist, best-selling author and the widow of Chiang Kai-shek's secret police chief, died Wednesday of stomach cancer at her home in New York. She was 77.Ms. Hsu covered Japan's war against China during World War II, then escaped to Taiwan with the youngest three of her eight children shortly after Mao Tse-tung's Communist takeover.Her husband, Mo Tze Shin, was executed by the Communists in 1951, and Ms. Hsu's book, "Mao Tse-tung Killed My Husband," was a best seller in Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | July 6, 2003
Apple CEO Steve Jobs and Ben and Jerry of super-fattening-ice-cream fame weren't the first guerrilla marketers, insists author Gabriel Stricker. As he puts it, "Mao -- the original 'Chairman' of the board -- beat you to the punch years ago." So what if Communist Party chairman Mao Tse-tung, the former head of China, wasn't a capitalist at heart? He knew how to win battles as an underdog, Stricker writes. In his new book, Mao in the Boardroom (St. Martin's Press, $14.95), out this past week, Stricker lays out Mao's theories, then describes how capitalist warriors apply them on the corporate battlefield today.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 2001
BEIJING - The collision last Sunday between U.S. and Chinese military planes has touched a nationalistic nerve here, fueling resentment toward what many see as the United States' arrogant use of power and frustration with China's own relative weakness. As U.S. officials met yesterday for a second time with 24 crew members held in China's southern island of Hainan, people on the streets of Beijing continued to seethe with anger toward the United States, demanding an unconditional apology and compensation.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
LI Zhisui, 75, the personal doctor of Mao Tse-tung whose recently published memoirs portrayed the Chinese leader as a manipulative egomaniac with little tolerance of dissent and scant care for hygiene, died Tuesday of an apparent heart attack at his home in suburban Chicago. He was little known outside China until his book, "The Private Life of Chairman Mao: The Memoirs of Mao's Personal Physician," was published last October. The book included sometimes-racy anecdotes and unusual insights into the workings of the upper echelons of the Chinese government.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | October 7, 1994
WAS MAO Tse-tung, the great "liberator of the Chinese people," capable of loving them?The man who may well know more about the legendary Chinese communist's real life than anyone living today did not hesitate when I asked him that question.Love the people?" Dr. Li Zhisui responded immediately. "No. In public demonstrations, he talked of love. But in his personal life, anyone who got in his way had to be destroyed."The Chinese doctor's watershed book, "The Private Life of Chairman Mao," parts of it condensed in U.S. News & World Report, is causing quite a stir.
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