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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 4, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- By its very name this country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission had two functions: to expose the crimes of the apartheid era and to help bridge the racial divide.Its 3,500-page report, issued in October, spread the blame for gross violations of human rights across the political spectrum, bringing it plaudits for evenhandedness.The ruling African National Congress even tried to get a court order suppressing the commission's findings. It was, argued the ANC, unfair for the anti-apartheid movement to be put in the same dock as the perpetrators of the system of white supremacy.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | September 13, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Desmond Tutu giggles often and cries easily. But that should not fool anyone. At 75, the retired Anglican archbishop who valiantly fought the evils of apartheid retains a feisty willingness to tweak those in power. Only now, South Africa is ruled by the black-led African National Congress, the same movement Tutu worked alongside during the long, bitter struggle to end oppressive white minority rule. "I'm so desperately anxious for our country to succeed, and it has the capacity, the potential," the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize winner said in an interview, explaining his blunt talk.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- If this country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission could live up to its name, it would be the perfect model of how a nation can come to terms with an appalling past.But much of the truth of who did what to whom during the years of apartheid is proving hard to come by, and reconciliation between the victims and their persecutors, between the those who implemented the system and those who overthrew it, is still far from being achieved.Just how difficult it is to establish the truth was demonstrated over the past two weeks at the hearings into the violence surrounding Winnie Madikizela-Mandela and her Mandela United Football club.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 26, 2005
WINTERVELD, South Africa - The gravedigger worked rhythmically under a bright sun, flinging the dirt up and to his right, hoping to unearth new secrets from South Africa's apartheid past. "If it's a complete skeleton, we know it's not our guy. We're looking for body parts," said Madeleine Fullard, looking on at the cemetery 50 miles north of Johannesburg. Fullard supervises a government task force seeking the remains of hundreds of missing anti-apartheid fighters believed to be dead, many of them burned or the victims of bombings carried out by police as late as the 1980s.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Acknowledging that it may have gone far outside the law in granting a blanket amnesty to top officials of South Africa's ruling government, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said yesterday that it would submit its decision to a court for review.vTC The amnesty, granted last month to 37 leaders of the African National Congress, including Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, immediately drew fire from South Africa's other political parties.They pointed out that the amnesty was unlike any other issued by the commission.
NEWS
June 20, 1998
THANKS to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa, the world knows more about the evils of the former apartheid regime of that country than during its pariah existence before 1994. What it did to defend against majority will and world opinion is worse than anyone outside South Africa imagined.Physicians and scientists who worked for the government have in recent weeks told horror tales to the commission, chaired by Archbishop Desmond Tutu. They compare to the medical experiments of Nazi Germany in the 1940s and to science-fiction fantasy.
NEWS
September 8, 1997
IN ITS YEAR and a half of operation, South Africa's extraordinary Truth and Reconciliation Commission has had plenty of critics. Some think it is a "Kleenex commission" that attempts to wipe away apartheid-era crimes. Others see it as a witch hunt. Yet others cannot understand how Nelson Mandela's government can so readily turn the other cheek and promise amnesty to those acknowledging their responsibility in atrocities.So far, the commission has granted amnesty to 47 people who have made a full confession to crimes that were committed between the 1960 Sharpeville massacre and the end of apartheid in 1993.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 12, 2002
PRETORIA, South Africa - The man South Africans dubbed "Dr. Death" - the mastermind behind apartheid's bizarre and horrific chemical and biological weapons program against its black opponents - was acquitted yesterday of all charges against him, including murder, fraud and drug dealing. Reading from his 1,500-page judgment, Pretoria High Court Judge Willie Hartzenberg declared that state prosecutors - after 2 1/2 years and more than 200 witnesses - had failed to prove their case against Dr. Wouter Basson.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 26, 2005
WINTERVELD, South Africa - The gravedigger worked rhythmically under a bright sun, flinging the dirt up and to his right, hoping to unearth new secrets from South Africa's apartheid past. "If it's a complete skeleton, we know it's not our guy. We're looking for body parts," said Madeleine Fullard, looking on at the cemetery 50 miles north of Johannesburg. Fullard supervises a government task force seeking the remains of hundreds of missing anti-apartheid fighters believed to be dead, many of them burned or the victims of bombings carried out by police as late as the 1980s.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - No amount of money will replace the Rev. Michael Lapsley's hands, his eye or his broken ear drums or erase the horrible memories of the day a letter bomb sent by a pro-apartheid hit squad exploded on his coffee table. "Any form of reparation is symbolic," says Lapsley, an Anglican priest who was an outspoken critic of South Africa's system of white minority rule when he was maimed in the 1990 blast. "It's a way of saying, `We want to make it up to those who have been injured by the conflict.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 12, 2002
PRETORIA, South Africa - The man South Africans dubbed "Dr. Death" - the mastermind behind apartheid's bizarre and horrific chemical and biological weapons program against its black opponents - was acquitted yesterday of all charges against him, including murder, fraud and drug dealing. Reading from his 1,500-page judgment, Pretoria High Court Judge Willie Hartzenberg declared that state prosecutors - after 2 1/2 years and more than 200 witnesses - had failed to prove their case against Dr. Wouter Basson.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 20, 2001
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - No amount of money will replace the Rev. Michael Lapsley's hands, his eye or his broken ear drums or erase the horrible memories of the day a letter bomb sent by a pro-apartheid hit squad exploded on his coffee table. "Any form of reparation is symbolic," says Lapsley, an Anglican priest who was an outspoken critic of South Africa's system of white minority rule when he was maimed in the 1990 blast. "It's a way of saying, `We want to make it up to those who have been injured by the conflict.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 4, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- By its very name this country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission had two functions: to expose the crimes of the apartheid era and to help bridge the racial divide.Its 3,500-page report, issued in October, spread the blame for gross violations of human rights across the political spectrum, bringing it plaudits for evenhandedness.The ruling African National Congress even tried to get a court order suppressing the commission's findings. It was, argued the ANC, unfair for the anti-apartheid movement to be put in the same dock as the perpetrators of the system of white supremacy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa is faced with a dilemma in the aftermath of last week's findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which accused some of this nation's leading figures of apartheid-era atrocities.The question now: What action to take against those on both sides charged by the commission with gross violations of human rights?They include an ex-president, three political party leaders, a former defense chief, and perhaps this country's best known woman activist, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, former wife of President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 30, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The Truth and Reconciliation Commission ends its investigation of this nation's apartheid past tomorrow having produced horrifying truths and not much reconciliation.The picture that emerged is shocking, revealing a system under which violence and wickedness were practically unrestrained.The TRC commissioners have been confronted with horror, pathos, eloquence, amnesia, evasions and lies. First came the harrowing testimony of the victims. Then, the spine-chilling confessions of the perpetrators.
NEWS
June 20, 1998
THANKS to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa, the world knows more about the evils of the former apartheid regime of that country than during its pariah existence before 1994. What it did to defend against majority will and world opinion is worse than anyone outside South Africa imagined.Physicians and scientists who worked for the government have in recent weeks told horror tales to the commission, chaired by Archbishop Desmond Tutu. They compare to the medical experiments of Nazi Germany in the 1940s and to science-fiction fantasy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 2, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa is faced with a dilemma in the aftermath of last week's findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which accused some of this nation's leading figures of apartheid-era atrocities.The question now: What action to take against those on both sides charged by the commission with gross violations of human rights?They include an ex-president, three political party leaders, a former defense chief, and perhaps this country's best known woman activist, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, former wife of President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 13, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, severely damaged by testimony against her before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, now faces a new setback to her political ambitions.She wants to be the vice president of the African National Congress, the party led by her former husband President Nelson Mandela. But the ANC leadership wants nothing to do with her.The ANC's nominations committee left her name off the list of candidates this week for the party's top six slots, which will be balloted during the party's national conference at Mafeking next week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 14, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Acknowledging that it may have gone far outside the law in granting a blanket amnesty to top officials of South Africa's ruling government, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission said yesterday that it would submit its decision to a court for review.vTC The amnesty, granted last month to 37 leaders of the African National Congress, including Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, immediately drew fire from South Africa's other political parties.They pointed out that the amnesty was unlike any other issued by the commission.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 13, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, severely damaged by testimony against her before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, now faces a new setback to her political ambitions.She wants to be the vice president of the African National Congress, the party led by her former husband President Nelson Mandela. But the ANC leadership wants nothing to do with her.The ANC's nominations committee left her name off the list of candidates this week for the party's top six slots, which will be balloted during the party's national conference at Mafeking next week.
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