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By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2000
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - The Hudson River Valley, with its lush views and rich cultural landscape, has become one of the most endangered historic sites in the country because of encroaching development by electrical utilities and other industries, the nation's largest privately run preservation group has warned. The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a nonprofit group based in Washington, chose the verdant, 125-mile stretch from New York City to Albany for its annual list of most endangered places for the first time since it began compiling it in 1988.
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NEWS
May 20, 2006
Assault weapon ad just a political ploy Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan's ad campaign attacking Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. concerning assault weapons is totally misguided ("Spat over ad spotlights Ehrlich's gun position," May 16). No one believes that we need more firearms (of any kind) "on the streets" to be used illegally by felons and gang members, and Mr. Ehrlich certainly does not believe this. But these semiautomatic rifles are used so infrequently in crime that no Maryland police agency has a sub-category for their use in its crime listings.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
A distinguished national historic preservation organization agreed yesterday to pay $225,000 to a Washington developer to settle two lawsuits over development of a historic Eastern Shore farm protected by a conservation easement.The settlement by the National Trust for Historic Preservation prohibits development at the 18th-century plantation, known as Myrtle Grove, except for putting in a small wildlife pond near the two-story Colonial mansion."We're very pleased," said Paul Edmondson, the trust's attorney.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
The city of Annapolis and Goucher College are negotiating a deal that would allow the Towson school to do historic preservation fieldwork in the state capital, which city and college officials say would provide an ideal laboratory for budding archaeologists. Talks are in the preliminary stages, but Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has set up a volunteer group to help Goucher develop a curriculum. Fred Mauk, the school's associate dean for graduate and professional studies, said, "We're very enthusiastic about the possibilities."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1994
Baltimore's rotting Inner Harbor centerpiece, the Constellation, was listed today among "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places" by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.The listing brings national attention to efforts to restore the 141-year-old sloop-of-war but no money. At least not right away."I'm really happy. I'm very pleased," said Gail Shawe, who was named two weeks ago by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to help plan and finance the U.S.F. Constellation Foundation's restoration efforts.
NEWS
December 20, 1999
The archaeology program at Historic London Town and Gardens has been designated an official project of Save America's Treasures, a public-private partnership of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the White House Millennium Council.In remarks prepared for the designation ceremony held Thursday, National Trust President Richard Moe wrote of the importance in entering the next millennium of preserving not only historic buildings, but "the places where our history unfolds.""The Lost Towns of Anne Arundel Archaeology Project is unearthing evidence that London Town was a thriving port of the Chesapeake Bay," Moe wrote, adding, "This project is a terrific example of how we can inspire future generations by rediscovering our past."
NEWS
June 17, 1999
WHAT EXACTLY would be preserved if the city's ambitious west-side development came to a halt? Would Baltimore be better off if these half-vacant stores and offices were left intact?That seems to be the curious position of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which has placed the west side of downtown on its list of "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places."It is a classic case of a well-intended but misguided effort to keep historically important buildings from being torn down.
NEWS
By new york times news service | November 6, 1997
NEW YORK - Preservationists worried that Congress is ignoring the accelerating decay of the long-neglected south side of Ellis Island have raised $50,000 to shore up one of the 24 buildings. They say that they hope the work will shame the federal government into paying for emergency repairs to the rest of the site.Peg Breen, president of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, said a new study indicates that for less than $3 million, all 24 buildings could be stabilized for up to 15 years. "But we have to act now," she said.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
If you are known by the company you keep, the long-neglected Monocacy Aqueduct just got famous.Maryland's U.S. senators and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton stood alongside the pre-Civil War structure yesterday to call for a public-private partnership to save pieces of American history.The aqueduct, part of the C&O Canal National Park, is one of the nation's 11 most endangered sites listed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The list is in its 10th year.Clinton called the list an important annual reminder of the fragile nature of history.
NEWS
By Charles Davant and Charles Davant,HEARST NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
WASHINGTON - Ellis Island, the port of entry for 12 million immigrants, and Congressional Cemetery, America's first national burial ground, are among the U.S. historic places most threatened by neglect, according to a leading preservation organization.The National Trust for Historic Preservation put them on its list of America's 11 most endangered sites - those threatened by development, vandalism and neglect - which it has published every year since 1988.The trust is a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1949.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
ST. MICHAELS - If there is a pedigree for skipjack captains, Scott Todd surely has one. At 39, he is one of a dwindling breed of watermen willing to stake their livelihood on the shallow-draft, sailing work boats that once dominated the Chesapeake Bay. And he doesn't plan on being the last. Yesterday, Todd joined a crowd of captains, shipwrights, carpenters, well-wishers and reporters around his 68-foot boat, the Lady Katie, at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum for a celebration of sorts - a declaration by the National Trust for Historic Preservation that the nation's last commercial sail fleet is also one of its 11 most endangered historic resources.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
Beer will soon be served again in historic Reynolds Tavern in Annapolis -- along with English tea. The 255-year-old building at a prominent location on Church Circle has been bought by a local couple who plan to reopen it this summer as an English pub, tearoom and bed-and-breakfast. The large brick building has been empty for more than three years as its owners -- Farmers Bank of Maryland, the Historic Annapolis Foundation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation -- searched for a preservation-minded buyer with a viable business plan.
NEWS
By Winnie Hu and Winnie Hu,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 16, 2000
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - The Hudson River Valley, with its lush views and rich cultural landscape, has become one of the most endangered historic sites in the country because of encroaching development by electrical utilities and other industries, the nation's largest privately run preservation group has warned. The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a nonprofit group based in Washington, chose the verdant, 125-mile stretch from New York City to Albany for its annual list of most endangered places for the first time since it began compiling it in 1988.
NEWS
December 20, 1999
The archaeology program at Historic London Town and Gardens has been designated an official project of Save America's Treasures, a public-private partnership of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the White House Millennium Council.In remarks prepared for the designation ceremony held Thursday, National Trust President Richard Moe wrote of the importance in entering the next millennium of preserving not only historic buildings, but "the places where our history unfolds.""The Lost Towns of Anne Arundel Archaeology Project is unearthing evidence that London Town was a thriving port of the Chesapeake Bay," Moe wrote, adding, "This project is a terrific example of how we can inspire future generations by rediscovering our past."
NEWS
June 17, 1999
WHAT EXACTLY would be preserved if the city's ambitious west-side development came to a halt? Would Baltimore be better off if these half-vacant stores and offices were left intact?That seems to be the curious position of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which has placed the west side of downtown on its list of "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places."It is a classic case of a well-intended but misguided effort to keep historically important buildings from being torn down.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
A distinguished national historic preservation organization agreed yesterday to pay $225,000 to a Washington developer to settle two lawsuits over development of a historic Eastern Shore farm protected by a conservation easement.The settlement by the National Trust for Historic Preservation prohibits development at the 18th-century plantation, known as Myrtle Grove, except for putting in a small wildlife pond near the two-story Colonial mansion."We're very pleased," said Paul Edmondson, the trust's attorney.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 28, 1998
Bill letting consumers appeal HMO decisions clears House, 0) 138-2A bill that would allow consumers to appeal adverse decisions by health maintenance organizations and other health insurers cleared the House of Delegates yesterday on a vote of 138-2.The House Democratic leadership has identified the measure, sponsored by Del. John P. Donoghue, a Hagerstown Democrat, as a top priority in the legislative session. Del. Michael E. Busch, an Anne Arundel County Democrat who is chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, has called it the most important consumer protection legislation in Annapolis this year.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
The city of Annapolis and Goucher College are negotiating a deal that would allow the Towson school to do historic preservation fieldwork in the state capital, which city and college officials say would provide an ideal laboratory for budding archaeologists. Talks are in the preliminary stages, but Mayor Ellen O. Moyer has set up a volunteer group to help Goucher develop a curriculum. Fred Mauk, the school's associate dean for graduate and professional studies, said, "We're very enthusiastic about the possibilities."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
If you are known by the company you keep, the long-neglected Monocacy Aqueduct just got famous.Maryland's U.S. senators and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton stood alongside the pre-Civil War structure yesterday to call for a public-private partnership to save pieces of American history.The aqueduct, part of the C&O Canal National Park, is one of the nation's 11 most endangered sites listed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The list is in its 10th year.Clinton called the list an important annual reminder of the fragile nature of history.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 28, 1998
Bill letting consumers appeal HMO decisions clears House, 0) 138-2A bill that would allow consumers to appeal adverse decisions by health maintenance organizations and other health insurers cleared the House of Delegates yesterday on a vote of 138-2.The House Democratic leadership has identified the measure, sponsored by Del. John P. Donoghue, a Hagerstown Democrat, as a top priority in the legislative session. Del. Michael E. Busch, an Anne Arundel County Democrat who is chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, has called it the most important consumer protection legislation in Annapolis this year.
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