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By Sydney H. Schanberg | February 27, 1991
TRUST US, the men in the White House keep saying to America: We know what's best for you; this war is best for you. But trust must first be given to be received. Why have President Bush and his men treated us as infants unable to think for ourselves? Why have they trusted us so little as to feel it necessary to tell us fibs that veered perilously close to deception throughout the process that led to this war?The answer is quite simple -- and profoundly insulting. It is clear now that Bush and his advisers believe that to tell the public anything approaching the whole truth might get people thinking and worrying and questioning.
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NEWS
Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they have trust in federal employees , a spike in public confidence that some are attributing to last year's partial government shutdown. In a recent Battleground Poll by George Washington University, 22 percent of registered voters surveyed said they had "a lot" of confidence in federal workers , and 51 percent said they had "some. " The public's confidence in the federal workforce waned in 2012 and 2013 after scandals involving the Internal Revenue Service and the General Services Administration but rebounded after the shutdown last October.
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FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
Don't be fooled. This baby can't be trusted. Quite suddenly, he cannot be relied upon to stay where he is put. Can you believe that? He's been rolling a bit for the past few weeks (so we've obviously been careful about where we lay him down), but now, he's rolling with purpose . Last night, he rolled across most of the living room to get to his big brother. The night before that, he saw me peeking in on him in his room and rolled -- and rotated himself! -- all the way to one end of his crib.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
The suspension of a Baltimore City police officer this week after a videotape surfaced showing him violently assaulting a citizen in June appears to confirm what has become a depressing pattern: A brutal attack that should have merited a swift response from authorities was instead met with a passive indifference - inaction that could easily be interpreted as an attempt to cover up the brutality of the crime. Sound familiar? It should, given the furor over the publication recently of a video showing the Ravens' Ray Rice knocking his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, unconscious in at Atlantic City casino hotel elevator in February.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Newsweek publishes a cover story by Niall Ferguson severely critical of President Obama. That is fine; there is ample ground to criticize the president from both the right and the left, and the First Amendment makes criticism of public officials a sacred right. The problem, as Paul Krugman painstakingly pointed out , is that Mr. Ferguson's article is open to repeated challenge on factual accuracy. Evidently Newsweek thought that anything written by a Harvard professor would be beyond reproach, and besides, the magazine dismantled its fact checking staff in 1996 . Instead, Newsweek spokesman Andrew Kirk told Politico, "We, like other news organisations today, rely on our writers to submit factually accurate material.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 29, 2011
Mark your calendars for upcoming screenings of the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition 's new documentary, Stealing Trust. The film chronicles how ordinary people across the state have fallen into financial troubles as a result of debt collection, shady contractors and banks that refused to offer loan modifications --- and how regulation failed to protect them. You can watch Stealing Trust at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4 at the Creative Alliance at The Patterson . UPDATED : Tickets cost $8, but $3 for members.
NEWS
March 15, 2010
Recently it has been reported that some members of the House of Representatives are fearful of voting to approve the Senate version of the health care reform bill because they don't trust the Senate to then follow through and pass their proposed changes. Is it any wonder, when one house of the legislative branch of our government doesn't trust the other, that public opinion polls show historically low levels of approval for this Congress? Now is the time for intelligent voters to start thinking about the November elections as being our chance to clean house.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
News that all of Baltimore's 83 speed cameras would be replaced sounded like a good first step to solve some of the issues plaguing the program until I read further ("City will replace all speed cameras," Jan. 8). I had to reread because of my disbelief: Brekford Corp. analyzed Baltimore's speed camera system and came up with the simple solution of replacing all the cameras for only $450,000! Isn't this like the fox in the hen house? Whatever happened to getting an objective third party to review the system instead and not a company that will profit greatly by its own recommendations?
NEWS
June 2, 2006
Baltimore's beleaguered school system is trying hard to regain public confidence and trust. That's a key reason why the Board of School Commissioners has insisted that Chief Operating Officer Eric T. Letsinger vacate his post after allegations that he planned to use system funds to pay for a chartered boat trip. While the situation is regrettable, the taint seemed to be too damaging for Mr. Letsinger to continue functioning effectively - and the school board is making every effort to be consistent in applying the same standards of conduct to all of its employees.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
The chasm between the Baltimore City Police Department and city residents seems to be widening ("Batts shakes up police top ranks," July 10). The only way out is simple: The police need to increase their communication with those whom they serve. For the citizens, it's all about opening up and cooperating with the police. Snitching is highly encouraged if is to the betterment of the community. Blood is flowing in our streets this summer. But police cannot do their jobs if witnesses do not come forward.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
A proposed state constitutional amendment creating a firewall for the Transportation Trust Fund will be on the ballot this fall, and while the legislation is flawed, it deserves voter support. The legislation (Senate Bill 829 of 2013) received bipartisan support in both the House and Senate. The proposed amendment provides that transportation revenue can be transferred to the general fund only if the governor by executive order declares a fiscal emergency and the General Assembly by a three-fifths vote concurs.
NEWS
By Zainab Chaudry | September 11, 2014
Last night, in a televised address to the nation, President Barack Obama outlined his administration's strategy for battling the terrorist group ISIS. While I support and even welcome part of his remarks - such as his firm distancing of ISIS from the true tenets of Islam, his admission that the majority of ISIS' victims have been other Muslims and his commitment of U.S. support for Syrian rebels fighting Bashar Assad's regime - there are some issues that cause concern. We must acknowledge that ISIS is born partly as a result of extensive destabilization in the region caused by America's and Britain's 2003 invasion of Iraq in search of non-existent weapons of mass destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
I love Sunday morning public affairs TV, and I had a chance today to be part of an animated discussion about why the public hates the press. Here's the video (below) from "Media Buzz" with me and Mediaite columnist Joe Concha as guests, and Howie Kurtz as host. I was not aware of the Gallup statistic Concha brought to the table about three out of four Americans trusting the press 40 years ago versus the sorry lack of credibility today. And when I find a way to go off on Chelsea Clinton and NBC News at about the five-minute mark, I want it duly noted that Kurtz introduced the topic -- not me. (But I thank him for it.)
NEWS
August 15, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's actions regarding city pensions show why Baltimore City will never be able to obtain and keep qualified police and fire personnel ("Federal court upholds mayor's pension overhaul," Aug. 6). When people come on a job they sign a contract that outlines what they will receive for their services when they retire. Throughout their careers contracts are renegotiated and each party expects the other to abide by the terms agreed on. However, this mayor has ignored what was promised to retirees.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
City police officials have replaced the department's homicide chief in the wake of a string of unsolved murders this summer that shattered what had been a period of relative calm. Maj. Stanley Brandford will take over the homicide unit from Maj. Dennis Smith, who had been running homicide along with the shooting and robbery divisions since April. Putting the unit under separate command is probably the right move given the outsized role homicides play in shaping perceptions of Baltimore.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
Your recent report on the conflict in Gaza alternately misstates the facts, omits them or misrepresents them ("Israel continues Gaza strikes," Aug. 3). Your statement that the fighting broke out on July 8 with Israeli airstrikes would lead the uninformed reader to believe that Israel started this war, when in fact the Israeli action was a delayed response to increasing rocket fire from Gaza that began weeks earlier. You printed a photograph lamenting the loss of the Omari mosque without noting that Hamas has habitually used schools, mosques, hospitals and even cemeteries as bases from which to launch rocket attacks.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 28, 2011
Conventional wisdom around the Ravens was that once Jimmy Smith recovered from the high left ankle sprain that had shelved him since the season opener on Sept. 11, the rookie cornerback would quickly overtake Danny Gorrer as the fifth defensive back in the defense's nickel package. But that wasn't the case on Monday night as Gorrer, not Smith, lined up as the nickel back in the team's 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars. Smith, who is still dealing with some soreness in the ankle, was relegated to strictly special teams work against Jacksonville.
NEWS
July 8, 2002
IT'S A SCANDAL that predates Enron, Tyco International and WorldCom: Boxes of records have been destroyed, and the fate of the documents covered up. A whistleblower needed protecting. The accounts of about 300,000 people are at stake. And the potential financial fallout could exceed $20 billion. It sounds like the latest example of corporate corruption, but this scandal is a case of colossal bureaucratic bungling. Malfeasance isn't the problem; mismanagement is. At issue is the Department of Interior's shockingly lax management of 56 million acres of Indian land and the royalties paid to individual Native Americans or Indian tribes for use of the land.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
The Palestinians are certainly the biggest liars and hypocrites in the world ( "The way forward in Gaza ," July 25). On the one hand they claim they have no idea why Israel is attacking them, yet they have fired thousands of rockets into Israel and have built more than 40 tunnels deep into Israeli territory so they can infiltrate heavily armed terrorists to murder and kidnap Israeli citizens. And these are strong, concrete tunnels located under schools and civilian targets.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Driver advocacy organization AAA Mid-Atlantic, known for its roadside assistance and insurance and travel services, is moving headlong into a new market in Maryland: automotive repair and maintenance. "It's a major retooling of our retail structure," said Bernhard M. Koch, the group's president and CEO, at the official opening of the group's newest retail shop and mechanic's garage in Columbia on Friday. While AAA will continue to give its seal of approval to independent auto repair shops through its "approved automotive repair network," which includes about 80 shops in Maryland, its own entrance into the market has been expanding at a steady clip in recent years.
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