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By VIDA ROBERTS | August 5, 1993
The designer trunk show is as old as traveling salesman jokes and as new as this week's hemlines. There was a time, before Elsa Klensch revealed the mysteries of the haute couture to one and all via cable TV, that the only way designer clothes could be seen was at tony local specialty stores. That's when designers packed up their entire collections in trunks and took them cross country to show them on models, explain their design direction and charm the customers into ordering those special frocks for the season ahead.
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By Rachel Gatulis, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Toward the end of the summer, I was up in Cape Cod and visited this adorable vintage bridal shop with my future mother-in-law and bridesmaid Lindsey. I found a great veil with three rows of satin edges that was both beautiful and inexpensive, so I bought it. It has been in my car, in a bag ever since. Two weekends ago, I went to Betsy Robinson to try on my dress for two out-of-town bridesmaids. I brought my trusty vintage veil only to discover that vintage equaled really, really yellow.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | June 9, 2011
In the tradition of the old-fashioned trunk show, home furnishings vendors often stage events to present new fabrics, wallpapers, finishes and more to interior designers hungry for new ideas. The materials typically come in swatches or sample books or even catalogs. But at McLain Wiesand's recent trunk show, the new products were on a runway. For the second year in a row, the Baltimore custom furniture maker put on the event, drawing a crew of home furnishings sales reps to set up displays to pitch their new products.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | August 11, 2011
It seems you can buy just about anything at discount retailer Costco. Now, brides visiting the Costco store in Howard County next week will be able to buy a wedding dress designed by Kirstie Kelly. The four-day trunk show will be held from Aug. 18 through the 21 st at the store at 6675 Marie Curie Drive in Elkridge. The retailer says gowns will start at 40 percent off retail price. Not keen on buying a dress next to gallons of mayonnaise or 300 pairs of tube socks for $10?
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
She's the wedding dress designer to the stars: Philippines-raised and Los Angeles-residing Monique Lhuillier, whose sexy but classy take on bridal and evening gowns has made her one of the hottest young designers in Hollywood. This week, Lhuillier's talent train makes a first-ever stop in Baltimore, and more local brides will have the chance to be outfitted for their weddings by the same bridal gown designer who dressed Britney Spears and Kevin Costner's wife. Today through Saturday, a representative from Lhuillier's company will be presenting a trunk show of her most current designs at Betsy Robinson's Bridal Collection in Pikesville.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | August 11, 2011
It seems you can buy just about anything at discount retailer Costco. Now, brides visiting the Costco store in Howard County next week will be able to buy a wedding dress designed by Kirstie Kelly. The four-day trunk show will be held from Aug. 18 through the 21 st at the store at 6675 Marie Curie Drive in Elkridge. The retailer says gowns will start at 40 percent off retail price. Not keen on buying a dress next to gallons of mayonnaise or 300 pairs of tube socks for $10?
FEATURES
By Rachel Gatulis, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Toward the end of the summer, I was up in Cape Cod and visited this adorable vintage bridal shop with my future mother-in-law and bridesmaid Lindsey. I found a great veil with three rows of satin edges that was both beautiful and inexpensive, so I bought it. It has been in my car, in a bag ever since. Two weekends ago, I went to Betsy Robinson to try on my dress for two out-of-town bridesmaids. I brought my trusty vintage veil only to discover that vintage equaled really, really yellow.
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By Jill L. Kubatko | April 26, 1992
Due to inaccurate information supplied to The Sun, an artist' name was omitted from an item in Sunday's On the Home Front. Watercolor artist Roberta Lang of Lutherville also contributed art for the game, "Garden Plots: A Floral Card Game."* The Sun regrets the error.A game for gardenersJill Ann Williams initially compiled the stack of gardening reference cards to help her with her volunteer duties at the Cylburn Arboretum, but others also found her comprehensive notes so useful that she decided to make them part of an educational card game.
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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 26, 1992
DALLAS -- This wouldn't seem to be the best time to be a fashion designer, what with retail outlets folding, designer labels dying and customers staying away from stores in droves.But Marc Jacobs doesn't see it that way."The recession has made it more fun for me," said Mr. Jacobs, 28, who has been the women's wear designer for the Perry Ellis label for more than three years."I can't see doing anything that requires spending money unless it's a pleasant, fun experience," he said. "If I spend money, it has to be on something I love.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | August 7, 2010
Trends mystify me. It's hard for me to imagine buying something just because it's currently in fashion. In fact, I normally do just the opposite. Still, when it's time to buy new furniture or redo the drapes, better to follow the trends than risk being passé. And while trends are often "created" by marketing gurus in effort to sell new products, trends with staying power, those that eventually morph into classics, emerge organically, because somewhere, someone smart was paying attention and filled a need before it even existed.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | June 9, 2011
In the tradition of the old-fashioned trunk show, home furnishings vendors often stage events to present new fabrics, wallpapers, finishes and more to interior designers hungry for new ideas. The materials typically come in swatches or sample books or even catalogs. But at McLain Wiesand's recent trunk show, the new products were on a runway. For the second year in a row, the Baltimore custom furniture maker put on the event, drawing a crew of home furnishings sales reps to set up displays to pitch their new products.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | August 7, 2010
Trends mystify me. It's hard for me to imagine buying something just because it's currently in fashion. In fact, I normally do just the opposite. Still, when it's time to buy new furniture or redo the drapes, better to follow the trends than risk being passé. And while trends are often "created" by marketing gurus in effort to sell new products, trends with staying power, those that eventually morph into classics, emerge organically, because somewhere, someone smart was paying attention and filled a need before it even existed.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
She's the wedding dress designer to the stars: Philippines-raised and Los Angeles-residing Monique Lhuillier, whose sexy but classy take on bridal and evening gowns has made her one of the hottest young designers in Hollywood. This week, Lhuillier's talent train makes a first-ever stop in Baltimore, and more local brides will have the chance to be outfitted for their weddings by the same bridal gown designer who dressed Britney Spears and Kevin Costner's wife. Today through Saturday, a representative from Lhuillier's company will be presenting a trunk show of her most current designs at Betsy Robinson's Bridal Collection in Pikesville.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | August 5, 1993
The designer trunk show is as old as traveling salesman jokes and as new as this week's hemlines. There was a time, before Elsa Klensch revealed the mysteries of the haute couture to one and all via cable TV, that the only way designer clothes could be seen was at tony local specialty stores. That's when designers packed up their entire collections in trunks and took them cross country to show them on models, explain their design direction and charm the customers into ordering those special frocks for the season ahead.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko | April 26, 1992
Due to inaccurate information supplied to The Sun, an artist' name was omitted from an item in Sunday's On the Home Front. Watercolor artist Roberta Lang of Lutherville also contributed art for the game, "Garden Plots: A Floral Card Game."* The Sun regrets the error.A game for gardenersJill Ann Williams initially compiled the stack of gardening reference cards to help her with her volunteer duties at the Cylburn Arboretum, but others also found her comprehensive notes so useful that she decided to make them part of an educational card game.
FEATURES
By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 26, 1992
DALLAS -- This wouldn't seem to be the best time to be a fashion designer, what with retail outlets folding, designer labels dying and customers staying away from stores in droves.But Marc Jacobs doesn't see it that way."The recession has made it more fun for me," said Mr. Jacobs, 28, who has been the women's wear designer for the Perry Ellis label for more than three years."I can't see doing anything that requires spending money unless it's a pleasant, fun experience," he said. "If I spend money, it has to be on something I love.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,New York Times News ServiceEdited by Catherine Cook | March 5, 1992
Stepping elegantlyAfter business is settled, assignments dispersed and plans drafted the conversation will turn to shoes. Women who juggle career, family and a heavy social schedule want to walk in high fashion even when they are on the run. It takes a woman of style and sensibility to under-stand that need. Charna Garber, who with her daughter Ellise Garber designs the d'Rosanna shoe line, has that dramatic sense and the answers.The creative initiative was taken by Charna Garber, who after many years experience in the shoe business decided to strike out on her own. The designs clicked with women of fashion and buyers for the finest stores.
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By Katharine Ward and Katharine Ward,Sun reporter | February 24, 2007
Devotees of Bravo's Project Runway might remember Austin Scarlett for the romantic, feminine creations he sent down the catwalk in Runway's first season. Now he is the designer and creative director of the Kenneth Pool line of wedding dresses. Today, he will appear in Pikesville for the collection's trunk show at the Betsy Robinson Bridal Collection. The show allows brides-to-be a chance to see a variety of samples from the line and, in this case, meet the designer as well. Scarlett will be at the store from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., answering questions and helping brides with their selections.
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