Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrumpeter Swans
IN THE NEWS

Trumpeter Swans

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
IT'S A FINE spring day a few decades in the future, and near your boat something swirls massively, a 10-foot dinosaur of a fish.Virtually extinct in Chesapeake Bay waters for a century, sturgeon have begun to prosper since they were restocked in the Nanticoke River back in 1996.And from overhead comes a loud calling, as piercing as a Klaxon horn, absent from Chesapeake skies for about 200 years.Trumpeter swans, the world's largest flying waterfowl, are heading north, their ranks swelled to thousands from the little flock reintroduced to Dorchester County in the autumn of 1997.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
GRASONVILLE - State and federal wildlife officials are looking for someone who killed a trumpeter swan Sunday that was part of a research project in which ultralight planes are being used to teach the birds to migrate to the Chesapeake region - where they have not been seen for more than 200 years. In an effort that mimics a successful experiment with Canada geese depicted in the 1996 movie "Fly Away Home," scientists coaxed 10 of the rare swans to the Horsehead Wetlands Center near Kent Island from upstate New York on Jan. 18. The birds, all fitted with collars and transmitters to allow scientists at the center to track their movements as they gradually learn to feed in the wild, were seen by researchers in a secluded area along Cabin Creek in Queen Anne's County around 11 a.m. Sunday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
THE EAGLE has landed," the world heard in July 1969, as humans reached up and touched the moon.On Dec. 19, just as thrilling and profound, three trumpeter swans alighted in a Chesapeake salt marsh, their species' first return in two centuries.But how can you compare them, moonshot and swanfall (a British term for the birds' descent at migration's end)?The Saturn V that boosted Apollo 11 toward the lunar surface stood 363 feet high, weighed 6 million pounds, propelled the astronauts to an escape velocity of seven miles a second, and struck a moving target a quarter-million miles distant with sniper's precision.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
Yo Yo is a no-show.The 10-month-old trumpeter swan, one of three taught to migrate to Maryland's Eastern Shore in December behind an ultralight airplane, has been missing from her Dorchester County wintering grounds for two weeks."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
WARRENTON, Va. -- Flapping furiously to catch up with the ungainly ultralight airplane they regard as their mother, three sleek white trumpeter swans rose from a frosty hayfield at sunrise yesterday en route to the Chesapeake Bay.Yo Yo, Isabelle and Sid soon fell into formation off the right wingtip of the noisy aircraft. Together, the odd flock circled the field twice, wheeled gradually to the east and disappeared over treetops."They're in the air. They're moving in the direction we want them to. I'd say that's pretty close to perfect," said Bob Ferris, director of species conservation for the Defenders of Wildlife.
NEWS
March 20, 1993
A caption in The Sun of March 20 stated incorrectly that tundra swans were once known as trumpeter swans. In fact, they were once known as whistling swans.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
GRASONVILLE - State and federal wildlife officials are looking for someone who killed a trumpeter swan Sunday that was part of a research project in which ultralight planes are being used to teach the birds to migrate to the Chesapeake region - where they have not been seen for more than 200 years. In an effort that mimics a successful experiment with Canada geese depicted in the 1996 movie "Fly Away Home," scientists coaxed 10 of the rare swans to the Horsehead Wetlands Center near Kent Island from upstate New York on Jan. 18. The birds, all fitted with collars and transmitters to allow scientists at the center to track their movements as they gradually learn to feed in the wild, were seen by researchers in a secluded area along Cabin Creek in Queen Anne's County around 11 a.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
Yo Yo is a no-show.The 10-month-old trumpeter swan, one of three taught to migrate to Maryland's Eastern Shore in December behind an ultralight airplane, has been missing from her Dorchester County wintering grounds for two weeks."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 31, 1998
One of three trumpeter swans that learned to migrate at the wing of an ultralight airplane last fall appears to have begun her spring migration to Airlie, Va., on her own.Bob Ferris, of Defenders of Wildlife, said Yo Yo was spotted Sunday on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay, at a Patuxent River spot where the birds rested during their fall flight to the Eastern Shore. "She is going back the same way she came," Ferris said.The other two trumpeters remain at the Dorchester County wintering grounds.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Kirk Goolsby and Frank Standafer had a slight case of th jitters yesterday as they headed across Columbia's Wilde Lake on a skiff to swap a few swan eggs -- in the name of science, of course.They were part of an unfolding plan to help reintroduce trumpeter swans to the Chesapeake region. The graceful birds once lived here in great numbers but were devastated by early settlers. Since then, other, more aggressive kinds of swans have taken their place.The chief worry of Mr. Goolsby and Mr. Standafer yesterday was the potential ire of two trumpling swans, nicknamed Jim and Pattie, residing on the lake.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
THE EAGLE has landed," the world heard in July 1969, as humans reached up and touched the moon.On Dec. 19, just as thrilling and profound, three trumpeter swans alighted in a Chesapeake salt marsh, their species' first return in two centuries.But how can you compare them, moonshot and swanfall (a British term for the birds' descent at migration's end)?The Saturn V that boosted Apollo 11 toward the lunar surface stood 363 feet high, weighed 6 million pounds, propelled the astronauts to an escape velocity of seven miles a second, and struck a moving target a quarter-million miles distant with sniper's precision.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
WARRENTON, Va. -- Flapping furiously to catch up with the ungainly ultralight airplane they regard as their mother, three sleek white trumpeter swans rose from a frosty hayfield at sunrise yesterday en route to the Chesapeake Bay.Yo Yo, Isabelle and Sid soon fell into formation off the right wingtip of the noisy aircraft. Together, the odd flock circled the field twice, wheeled gradually to the east and disappeared over treetops."They're in the air. They're moving in the direction we want them to. I'd say that's pretty close to perfect," said Bob Ferris, director of species conservation for the Defenders of Wildlife.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
IT'S A FINE spring day a few decades in the future, and near your boat something swirls massively, a 10-foot dinosaur of a fish.Virtually extinct in Chesapeake Bay waters for a century, sturgeon have begun to prosper since they were restocked in the Nanticoke River back in 1996.And from overhead comes a loud calling, as piercing as a Klaxon horn, absent from Chesapeake skies for about 200 years.Trumpeter swans, the world's largest flying waterfowl, are heading north, their ranks swelled to thousands from the little flock reintroduced to Dorchester County in the autumn of 1997.
NEWS
March 20, 1993
A caption in The Sun of March 20 stated incorrectly that tundra swans were once known as trumpeter swans. In fact, they were once known as whistling swans.The Sun regrets the error.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 29, 1993
Last Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Environmental Defense Fund came to an agreement that would ban the manufacture, processing and distribution of some types of lead fishing weights in the United States.The EDF, a New York-based, non-profit organization, petitioned and then sued the EPA before the settlement was reached last week.The EDF based its arguments on studies that showed common loons, trumpeter swans and a Mississippi sandhill crane, an endangered species, had been poisoned by ingesting lead fishing sinkers.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Columbia is no paradise for trumpling swans.The disappearance of a trumpling swan from Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi in September and the spray-painting of a swan earlier this month have forced researchers to move the lake's four resident swans to Virginia.The swans were rounded up yesterday morning by Columbia Association workers to be transported to Airlie Center in central Virginia, a preserve and home to the Swan Research Program."I couldn't be happier to see them go. I was getting very worried about their safety," said Helen Thompson, a member of the Columbia Waterfowl Committee, a wildlife protection group.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.