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By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 2002
ANDREW HORRIGAN, 14, of Sykesville Middle School is busy preparing for the semifinal National Trumpet Competition, which will be held at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., on Friday. If Andrew is successful Friday, he will compete this weekend at the finals, with hopes of taking home the first-place prize -- a new Bach trumpet. The National Trumpet Competition is the largest competitive event for trumpet players ages 11 to 28. It attracts applicants from all over the United States and Canada, and is divided into seven divisions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Trumpet recitals are among the rarest of events in the classical music realm. It's just a guess on my part, but I imagine that recitals by female trumpeters have tended to be ever so slightly rarer. Which is to say that Sunday evening's appearance by Tine Thing Helseth for the Shriver Hall Concert Series was extra cool. The Oslo-born trumpeter, joined by an exceptional pianist, Bretton Brown, brought with her a vivid program. There aren't a ton of works originally composed for trumpet and piano.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 30, 1991
Although most people associate the sound of jazz with sultry saxophones and darkly thumping double basses, it's really the trumpet (along with its siblings, the cornet and flugelhorn) that should stand as the style's pre-eminent instrument. After all, jazz was essentially invented on the trumpet, back in 1922 when Louis Armstrong stepped forth from the ensemble in KingOliver's band to deliver its first improvised solo; the instrument's bright, brash tone and extraordinary melodic flexibility made it a natural leader.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Ravens fans giddy from Justin Tucker's stunning last-minute, third-longest game-winning field goal in the history of the NFL, got a treat while on the road today. Billboards along 95, 895 and I-83 proclaim "Legatron > Megatron" and "In Tucker we Trust"  in celebration of the Ravens' victory 18-16 over the Detroit Lions. Clear Channel Outdoor posted the messages this morning to the electronic billboards they own.   Twitter users reacted with delight, especially to the Legatron board.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1994
Gospel music turned Dontae Winslow on to jazz. If that sounds strange, let the young trumpet player who stars in tonight's Big Event benefit for the Children's Museum tell the story himself."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Arthur B. Jenkins Jr., a trumpet player and music teacher at Polytechnic Institute, died Friday of a heart attack at his Monastery Avenue home. He was 55.Mr. Jenkins influenced students by teaching them to employ music as an academic discipline and becoming a steadying influence in their lives."He was teaching his third generation of students," said Jan Levin, an employee of Shubert Music Co. in Pikesville, where Mr. Jenkins taught trumpet. "He produced a legacy of students who are coming in, buying music, favors and batons to put in his coffin."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 6, 2002
Towson University's Center for the Arts was turned into a center for the trumpets on Monday. The university's department of music offered master classes and workshops during the day, drawing area middle and high school students and teachers, and two concerts were held in the evening. Capping this mini-fest was a recital - more like half a recital, really - by Andrew Balio, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's remarkable principal trumpeter. His well-focused tone and clean technique produced particularly expressive results in Paul Hindemith's 1939 Sonata for Trumpet and Piano.
FEATURES
By Patricia O'Haire and Patricia O'Haire,New York Daily News | September 4, 1993
Some 100 trumpet players will be blowing their own horns tomorrow in New Jersey. All at once. And for free.Hopefully, it will also sound heavenly.The 100 horn players -- including such names as Ted Curson, Chuck Mangione, Jonah Jones, Kenny Barron, Randy Brecker, Doc Cheatham, Mike Leonhart, Donald Byrd and many, many more -- will be led by Jon Faddis, a Gillespie protege.They will blow away at the First Annual Trumpet Salute to Dizzy Gillespie, a benefit for the Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, where the good-natured, popular and highly innovative Gillespie died in January after a long illness.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,Contributing Writer | March 3, 1993
Lou Ginsberg won't say how old he is, but he will say this: When he played his first professional big band gig, it was 1933 and he was still wearing knickers.He's been wearing long pants for a long time, and the 60-year veteran of the Baltimore music scene is still playing his trumpet -- in Baltimore, in Pennsylvania, in Washington, even in North Carolina.With his Lou Ginsberg Orchestra, he still plays 75 gigs a year and books several more, at country clubs, parties and celebrations. In fact, some of his sidemen have been around as long as he has. Their repertoire is a history of whatever makes people get up and dance.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2007
Up to this point in their high school careers, many of the students in the Glenelg Jazz Ensemble have followed a musical path strikingly similar to that of accomplished Jazz trumpeter Alex Pope Norris. Tonight, they will experience firsthand where that familiar path can lead, when Norris returns to Howard County as guest soloist at the ensemble's benefit concert under the direction of Barry Enzman, Glenelg High School's director of bands, at 7:30 p.m. in the school auditorium. Norris, 39, started playing the trumpet at what was then Dasher Green Elementary School, stuck with it at Owen Brown Middle School, and continued to play at Hammond High.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The sculpture court at the Walters Art Museum is one of Baltimore's most inviting spaces. Acoustically, it's a bit of a soup, but who cares in such an ambience? That point was drive home Sunday evening when An Die Musik Live and the Walters presented the last in this season's series of early music concerts. This one, which drew a spill-over crowd, featured one of the Baltimore Symphony's star players, principal trumpet Andrew Balio, in a bright burst of baroque repertoire.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Baltimore has a national-class football team, and The Sun devotes a whole section to it during the season. Baltimore has a national-class baseball team, and The Sun devotes many pages to it during the season. Baltimore has a world-class symphony orchestra, and The Sun ignores reviewing its performances. Last Friday, a full symphony hall enjoyed a wonderful program with the most enthusiastic response that I have witnessed in 42 years as a subscriber. To Sun print readers, the program didn't exist.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Julie Minch has 60 daffodils cooling their petals in her refrigerator — and her fingers crossed. Wouldn't you know it? The Maryland Daffodil Society, the oldest in the nation, is the host of the national show and convention next weekend, and a strangely warm winter means the flower's season has come and nearly gone. "It is a little scary," said Minch of Baltimore and the convention chair. "But the Mid-Atlantic is such a perfect place to grow daffodils — and we have them coming in from other pockets of the country — so we are still hoping to get 2,000 blooms.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Nelson William Knode, a trumpeter who led a swing orchestra and was known as the music man of Catonsville, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 88 and lived in Relay. Born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue, he credited his parents with getting him into a life of music. "I'll tell you what kind of people they were," he said in a 1982 Sun article. "My dad was laid off by the B&O Railroad when I was 8 or 9 years old. It was right around Christmastime, and we didn't have two pennies to rub together.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek | July 20, 2008
Andrew Edward Neubauer, a Franklin High School honor student, died suddenly of unknown causes Wednesday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Reisterstown resident was 16. Andrew, born in Towson and raised in Reisterstown, attended Reisterstown Elementary School and Sudbrook Magnet Middle School before attending Franklin, where he would have been a junior this school year. A member of the gifted and talented education program at Franklin, Andrew excelled in math and science. He played trumpet in the school's symphonic band and dreamed of pursuing a career in computer science after college.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and June Arney and Justin Fenton and June Arney,Sun Reporters | June 8, 2008
Louis Ginsberg, a trumpeter for more than 60 years whose band played at President John F. Kennedy's inauguration, died Friday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 92. Mr. Ginsberg was born in Lynn, Mass., and moved to the Baltimore area when he was 10 years old. He graduated from City College in 1933. He started playing the trumpet in 1929, at age 13, and studied under musicians at the Peabody Conservatory and the National Symphony. From 1940 to 1941, he played trumpet with Don Bestor's Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun music critic | July 9, 2000
Of all musical instruments, none has inspired more awe than the trumpet. Its sound has been celebrated for centuries. Trumpets heralded the arrival of kings and emperors and have urged armies on to victory since the time of Tutankhamen. According to the Bible, Joshua used trumpet blasts to bring down the walls of Jericho, while the Book of Revelation promises the angel Gabriel will announce the end of time with a trumpet solo guaranteed to raise the dead. There's something brash and reckless -- macho, even -- about the instrument.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | January 21, 2007
American Idol" launched its sixth TV season with a double-barrel blast of shows Tuesday and Wednesday. Chris Botti didn't tune in - either night. The reason wasn't that the ever-touring trumpeter was busy giving concerts in Norfolk, Va. and Charlotte, N.C. CHRIS BOTTI AND BAND / / They perform tonight at 8 at the Lyric. 410-685-5087, www.chrisbotti.com
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 8, 2007
Before the Orioles' game last night, 23 wounded soldiers from across the nation were honored. Reliever Jamie Walker met them on the field beforehand. By now, he's well-versed in the early stages of this type of conversation. The soldiers shake his hand and give Walker an enthusiastic "thank you." And Walker interrupts them as soon as he can. "Hell, nah," he tells them. "Thank you." I don't share this with you because it is especially out of the ordinary. In fact, Walker does quite a bit of work with wounded soldiers and veterans of the armed forces.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | June 8, 2007
It happened in Ellicott City just a little after 5 p.m. Monday. Anyone on the outside looking in would describe the scene as rather ordinary; a couple of people appeared to be lounging around a home office, listening to something streaming over the speakers of a computer. But sometimes serendipity is on a reporter's side. In this case, an interview and the beginning of something potentially big in the world of blues and jazz converged. And though the first people to hear it over the airwaves probably were in and around St. Michael's College in Burlington, Vt. -- where station WWPV 88.7 was the first to air cuts from our hometown wunderkind -- the rest of us can hear it live this weekend at the Columbia Festival of the Arts.
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