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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 26, 1999
There's no avoiding the deja vu that comes while watching "EDtv," a comedy about a man whose life is being broadcast on television 24 hours a day.But despite its surface similarities to "The Truman Show," "EDtv" is actually a radically different movie: Truman was not aware that his every move was being watched by a rapt worldwide audience, but the star of "EDtv" is a willing guinea pig."EDtv" is a shaggy, low-brow cousin to "The Truman Show," less concerned with satirizing the tube than with doodling on our celebrity-obsessed pop culture, in which just "appearing" on TV is enough to make you famous -- even if you have accomplished little of merit.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 18, 2007
For nearly 30 years, he has been one of the best known, most instantly recognizable composers of our time, his music performed throughout the world to an unusually wide public. THE BSO / / Thursday at Music Center at Strathmore / / Friday through Feb. 25 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 410-783-8000 or baltimoresymphony.org Philip Glass Born: Baltimore, Jan. 31, 1937 Current home: New York City Early music studies: Entered Peabody Institute at age 8, studied flute High school: City College Higher education: Admitted to University of Chicago at age 15, majored in math and philosophy, also studied piano; entered Juilliard School in New York at 19 Musical landmark: Premiere of Einstein on the Beach at Metropolitan Opera, 1976 Film scores: The Thin Blue Line, Kundun, The Truman Show (Golden Globe winner)
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
"The Truman Show" meditates, variously, on the invasiveness of the media, on Americans' desperate need to identify with celebrities, on how society steamrolls individuals' innate sense of adventure and nudges them toward group mediocrity, on how personal contentment and conformity exist uneasily on the same slippery sliding scale.And this is a Jim Carrey movie?Well, it's also a Peter Weir film, and from his earliest films made in his native Australia, "Picnic at Hanging Rock" and "The Last Wave," to his high-profile Hollywood fare, "Witness," "The Mosquito Coast" and "Fearless," Weir has made films with profound themes, from the relationship between man and nature to confronting the specter of death.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
"You Can Count On Me" is as much a small miracle as a seashell, as unassuming and as full of echoes. The movie is so wise and restrained that days after I saw it, I found myself thinking about the complex reverberations that the characters set off in the people around them, vibrations that by the end of the film have built into an entire subliminal symphony. That's all the more remarkable because "You Can Count On Me" is writer-director Kenneth Lonergan's filmmaking debut. The movie is similar to "Tender Mercies" because it's about forgiveness and healing; to "A River Runs Through It" because it's about the impossibility of saving people who don't want to be saved; and to "The Sweet Hereafter" because it refuses to smooth over life's ambiguities.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"The Truman Show" is a movie and the name of a television show within the movie, both of which star Jim Carrey. This tidy little metaphysic is superbly maintained throughout Peter Weir's flawlessly executed film.From its opening moment, "The Truman Show" explores the porous membrane between fiction and reality -- are we watching the TV show or the movie about the TV show? -- and it never veers from its mission to keep the difference ambiguous.In its themes it recalls such films as "Network" and "Natural Born Killers."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 18, 2007
For nearly 30 years, he has been one of the best known, most instantly recognizable composers of our time, his music performed throughout the world to an unusually wide public. THE BSO / / Thursday at Music Center at Strathmore / / Friday through Feb. 25 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 410-783-8000 or baltimoresymphony.org Philip Glass Born: Baltimore, Jan. 31, 1937 Current home: New York City Early music studies: Entered Peabody Institute at age 8, studied flute High school: City College Higher education: Admitted to University of Chicago at age 15, majored in math and philosophy, also studied piano; entered Juilliard School in New York at 19 Musical landmark: Premiere of Einstein on the Beach at Metropolitan Opera, 1976 Film scores: The Thin Blue Line, Kundun, The Truman Show (Golden Globe winner)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 5, 1998
Since television was introduced to the throngs at the New York World's Fair in 1939, TV and the movies have had a curious relationship: at times hostile, at times mutually supportive and even, on rare occasions, spurring each other to greater creativity.Film and television have become so symbiotic it's difficult to believe that when TV was first introduced, the movie industry refused to have anything to do with it. Until the mid-1950s, the studios forbade their stars from appearing on television, and banned their films from being shown on the dreaded box.By 1956, the folly of such strategies had been made clear by two groundbreaking TV events: The huge success of ABC's "Disneyland" series, which not only was a hit with audiences but also provided valuable cross-promotion for Disney's theme park and feature films; and the 1956 airing on CBS of "The Wizard of the first feature film ever to be shown on television, and proof positive that Hollywood's movies could be invaluable programming fodder for the networks.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 5, 2000
The first thing Paul Romer, the executive producer of "Big Brother," wants viewers to know is that his new "reality" series premiering tonight on CBS is not "The Truman Show" and he is not Christoff, the beret-wearing, television producer-Svengali played by Ed Harris in that film. "The big difference between `The Truman Show' and `Big Brother' is that `The Truman Show' was fiction, and `Big Brother' is real," Romer said in a telephone conference call to promote the series that puts 10 strangers in a house for three months and lets us play peeping tom via 28 cameras and 60 microphones.
FEATURES
February 10, 1999
It's that time of year again, campers, so all together now:What were they thinking?* The wildly overstyled, overstuffed and underwhelming "Elizabeth" nominated for best picture over and above Peter Weir's captivating pop-culture fantasy "The Truman Show"?* The leaden, tin-eared "Primary Colors" nominated for best-adapted screenplay rather than Paul Schrader's finely calibrated adaptation of the Russell Banks novel "Affliction"?* Two very uneven films ("Hilary and Jackie," "Gods and Monsters")
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
"You Can Count On Me" is as much a small miracle as a seashell, as unassuming and as full of echoes. The movie is so wise and restrained that days after I saw it, I found myself thinking about the complex reverberations that the characters set off in the people around them, vibrations that by the end of the film have built into an entire subliminal symphony. That's all the more remarkable because "You Can Count On Me" is writer-director Kenneth Lonergan's filmmaking debut. The movie is similar to "Tender Mercies" because it's about forgiveness and healing; to "A River Runs Through It" because it's about the impossibility of saving people who don't want to be saved; and to "The Sweet Hereafter" because it refuses to smooth over life's ambiguities.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 5, 2000
The first thing Paul Romer, the executive producer of "Big Brother," wants viewers to know is that his new "reality" series premiering tonight on CBS is not "The Truman Show" and he is not Christoff, the beret-wearing, television producer-Svengali played by Ed Harris in that film. "The big difference between `The Truman Show' and `Big Brother' is that `The Truman Show' was fiction, and `Big Brother' is real," Romer said in a telephone conference call to promote the series that puts 10 strangers in a house for three months and lets us play peeping tom via 28 cameras and 60 microphones.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 26, 1999
There's no avoiding the deja vu that comes while watching "EDtv," a comedy about a man whose life is being broadcast on television 24 hours a day.But despite its surface similarities to "The Truman Show," "EDtv" is actually a radically different movie: Truman was not aware that his every move was being watched by a rapt worldwide audience, but the star of "EDtv" is a willing guinea pig."EDtv" is a shaggy, low-brow cousin to "The Truman Show," less concerned with satirizing the tube than with doodling on our celebrity-obsessed pop culture, in which just "appearing" on TV is enough to make you famous -- even if you have accomplished little of merit.
FEATURES
February 10, 1999
It's that time of year again, campers, so all together now:What were they thinking?* The wildly overstyled, overstuffed and underwhelming "Elizabeth" nominated for best picture over and above Peter Weir's captivating pop-culture fantasy "The Truman Show"?* The leaden, tin-eared "Primary Colors" nominated for best-adapted screenplay rather than Paul Schrader's finely calibrated adaptation of the Russell Banks novel "Affliction"?* Two very uneven films ("Hilary and Jackie," "Gods and Monsters")
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 5, 1998
Since television was introduced to the throngs at the New York World's Fair in 1939, TV and the movies have had a curious relationship: at times hostile, at times mutually supportive and even, on rare occasions, spurring each other to greater creativity.Film and television have become so symbiotic it's difficult to believe that when TV was first introduced, the movie industry refused to have anything to do with it. Until the mid-1950s, the studios forbade their stars from appearing on television, and banned their films from being shown on the dreaded box.By 1956, the folly of such strategies had been made clear by two groundbreaking TV events: The huge success of ABC's "Disneyland" series, which not only was a hit with audiences but also provided valuable cross-promotion for Disney's theme park and feature films; and the 1956 airing on CBS of "The Wizard of the first feature film ever to be shown on television, and proof positive that Hollywood's movies could be invaluable programming fodder for the networks.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 23, 1998
BOSTON -- I didn't make it in time for the delivery. It was just one of those things. A traffic jam on the Internet. Creep and beep. Stall and crawl. Everybody trying to get to the same Web site at the same time.When I was finally admitted to the birthing room at www.ahn.com in the Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando, Fla., Elizabeth had already given birth to the 7-pound, 8-ounce baby boy with the full head of black hair. And everyone, save baby Sean, was congratulating themselves for an Internet birth well done.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
"The Truman Show" meditates, variously, on the invasiveness of the media, on Americans' desperate need to identify with celebrities, on how society steamrolls individuals' innate sense of adventure and nudges them toward group mediocrity, on how personal contentment and conformity exist uneasily on the same slippery sliding scale.And this is a Jim Carrey movie?Well, it's also a Peter Weir film, and from his earliest films made in his native Australia, "Picnic at Hanging Rock" and "The Last Wave," to his high-profile Hollywood fare, "Witness," "The Mosquito Coast" and "Fearless," Weir has made films with profound themes, from the relationship between man and nature to confronting the specter of death.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 23, 1998
BOSTON -- I didn't make it in time for the delivery. It was just one of those things. A traffic jam on the Internet. Creep and beep. Stall and crawl. Everybody trying to get to the same Web site at the same time.When I was finally admitted to the birthing room at www.ahn.com in the Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando, Fla., Elizabeth had already given birth to the 7-pound, 8-ounce baby boy with the full head of black hair. And everyone, save baby Sean, was congratulating themselves for an Internet birth well done.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Mr. West is Washington bureau chief of The Sun | June 14, 1992
TRUMAN.David McCullough.Simon & Schuster.1,117 pages. $30. The 1980 Republican convention was out of control. From his perch in the CBS anchor booth, Walter Cronkite was brokering a deal that would put former President Gerald R. Ford on the Reagan ticket. At a nearby hotel, George Bush squirmed anxiously in his suite, awaiting a phone call that might never come.During a break in the action, a rookie reporter hurrying down a corridor at the convention hall found himself overtaken by the loping gait of Richard L. Strout, a journalistic legend who'd been covering presidential politics since the days of Warren G. Harding.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"The Truman Show" is a movie and the name of a television show within the movie, both of which star Jim Carrey. This tidy little metaphysic is superbly maintained throughout Peter Weir's flawlessly executed film.From its opening moment, "The Truman Show" explores the porous membrane between fiction and reality -- are we watching the TV show or the movie about the TV show? -- and it never veers from its mission to keep the difference ambiguous.In its themes it recalls such films as "Network" and "Natural Born Killers."
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Mr. West is Washington bureau chief of The Sun | June 14, 1992
TRUMAN.David McCullough.Simon & Schuster.1,117 pages. $30. The 1980 Republican convention was out of control. From his perch in the CBS anchor booth, Walter Cronkite was brokering a deal that would put former President Gerald R. Ford on the Reagan ticket. At a nearby hotel, George Bush squirmed anxiously in his suite, awaiting a phone call that might never come.During a break in the action, a rookie reporter hurrying down a corridor at the convention hall found himself overtaken by the loping gait of Richard L. Strout, a journalistic legend who'd been covering presidential politics since the days of Warren G. Harding.
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