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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO, if you spent an evening being entertained by Truman Capote you would have probably been one of the richest people in the world. Now, you just need the price of a ticket to the Mechanic Theatre."
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NEWS
March 2, 2008
Henry Johnson is a partner of Johnson/Berman, an interior design firm responsible for many high-profile projects, including the State House in Annapolis and the Maryland Club in Baltimore. Johnson has always had a keen interest in architectural history, which has informed much of his award-winning work for more than two decades. He says he believes that good design is not an accident, but the result of a thoughtful and purposeful approach to problem-solving with exact and specific goals.
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FEATURES
October 18, 1990
The makeup process for "Tru" was created by Kevin Haney, the Academy Award-winning key character makeup artist for the movie "Dick Tracy." It takes dresser and makeup artist Liz Spetnagel about 1 hour to transform Robert Morse into the likeness of Truman Capote."
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2007
Norman Mailer, the pugnacious two-time Pulitzer Prize winner who jabbed and bobbed his way through an extraordinary career as one of the most original and audacious voices in postwar American letters, died yesterday. He was 84. Beset by serious health problems that required heart bypass surgery in 2005 and hospitalizations for lung problems this fall, Mailer died of acute renal failure at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, said his literary executor, J. Michael Lennon. Mailer, called "a great and obsessed stylist" by Joan Didion, wrote nearly 50 books that zigzagged among genres, including fiction, biography, history, essays and highly personal journalism.
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By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1997
"Truman Capote: In Which Various Friends, Enemies, Acquaintances, and Detractors Recall His Turbulent Career," by George Plimpton. Talese/Doubleday. Illustrated. 498 pages. $35.OK, so remarks aren't literature. Still, had Gertrude Stein encountered the literary techniques of George Plimpton, she might have amended that famous bon mot once lobbed to Ernest Hemingway. Remarks are, in fact, biography. Or at least they are when choreographed by the old-pro writer, Paris Review editor, commercial pitchman, actor and literary personage-about-town whose concept of "participatory journalism" is to round up a parade of fellow personages and get them jawing.
NEWS
March 2, 2008
Henry Johnson is a partner of Johnson/Berman, an interior design firm responsible for many high-profile projects, including the State House in Annapolis and the Maryland Club in Baltimore. Johnson has always had a keen interest in architectural history, which has informed much of his award-winning work for more than two decades. He says he believes that good design is not an accident, but the result of a thoughtful and purposeful approach to problem-solving with exact and specific goals.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
In Infamous, a bevy of New York City socialites, a flock of Holcomb, Kan., solid citizens and at least one killer circle around Truman Capote (Toby Jones) like brightly colored gypsy moths around a flame. Why did writer-director Douglas McGrath call this Infamous? A better title might be Irresistible. This is the musical-comedy version of Capote, complete with Gwyneth Paltrow doing a Peggy Lee imitation on a Cole Porter song, a Greek chorus of high-society gals (Sigourney Weaver, Isabella Rossellini and Hope Davis)
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By CAROLE GOLDBERG and CAROLE GOLDBERG,HARTFORD COURANT | October 25, 2005
Americans love everything new, the latest scoop, brand-new names, fresh ideas. But sometimes when it comes to reading, the hot new thing may be a great old book. When a major film adaptation or anniversary brings a classic back into the spotlight, publishers have the opportunity to recapture its earlier audience and attract new readers by "rebranding" it. Through reprints with freshly designed covers adorned with movie images, or a banner proclaiming the anniversary edition or tie-ins to other works by that author, they can make something old seem new again and further enhance an author's reputation.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 16, 1990
Flashing the gap-toothed grin he became famous for nearly 30 years ago in "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," Robert Morse enters his dressing room at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. With his shock of hair and boyish face, the 59-year-old actor still looks like the young upstart he played in that musical.But it's 12:45 p.m. on a matinee day, and -- thanks to the wonders of makeup -- when Mr. Morse leaves this room in a little more than an hour, he will be transformed into a round-faced, pouty, heavily jowled man with a broad forehead and thinning hair.
NEWS
May 6, 1999
Edward Davis, 88, a one-time mechanic who became the first black American to own a new car dealership, selling Studebakers and later Chrysler-Plymouth vehicles, died of congestive heart failure Monday in Detroit. In 1993, the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers created the annual Edward Davis Pioneer Award. In January, Mr. Davis became the first black man to be inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame Museum in Dearborn. George Butler, 94, an artist and the oldest living member of Britain's prestigious Royal Watercolor Society, died April 19 in Bakewell, England.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
In Infamous, a bevy of New York City socialites, a flock of Holcomb, Kan., solid citizens and at least one killer circle around Truman Capote (Toby Jones) like brightly colored gypsy moths around a flame. Why did writer-director Douglas McGrath call this Infamous? A better title might be Irresistible. This is the musical-comedy version of Capote, complete with Gwyneth Paltrow doing a Peggy Lee imitation on a Cole Porter song, a Greek chorus of high-society gals (Sigourney Weaver, Isabella Rossellini and Hope Davis)
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | October 30, 2005
Before he declined, he dazzled. While some writers gain power as they mature, Truman Capote, subject of a new feature film, Capote, spiraled down, personally and professionally. But several of his works, mostly the early ones, qualify as very good literature: Other Voices, Other Rooms: This 1948 book was Capote's first published novel, and it was a fine start. Vivid and lean, it's the story of Joel Knox, who is searching for his lost father - a theme drawn directly from Capote's life.
FEATURES
By CAROLE GOLDBERG and CAROLE GOLDBERG,HARTFORD COURANT | October 25, 2005
Americans love everything new, the latest scoop, brand-new names, fresh ideas. But sometimes when it comes to reading, the hot new thing may be a great old book. When a major film adaptation or anniversary brings a classic back into the spotlight, publishers have the opportunity to recapture its earlier audience and attract new readers by "rebranding" it. Through reprints with freshly designed covers adorned with movie images, or a banner proclaiming the anniversary edition or tie-ins to other works by that author, they can make something old seem new again and further enhance an author's reputation.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 2001
Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird is part civil rights saga, part children's coming-of-age story, part courtroom drama and part suspense tale. The 1962 movie version, with its Academy Award-winning screenplay by Horton Foote, beautifully balanced all these elements. But Christopher Sergel's 90-minute stage adaptation barely breaks the surface, and Timothy Childs' front-and-center direction makes the courtroom speeches feel more like soapbox declarations than impassioned entreaties to judge and jury.
NEWS
May 6, 1999
Edward Davis, 88, a one-time mechanic who became the first black American to own a new car dealership, selling Studebakers and later Chrysler-Plymouth vehicles, died of congestive heart failure Monday in Detroit. In 1993, the National Association of Minority Automobile Dealers created the annual Edward Davis Pioneer Award. In January, Mr. Davis became the first black man to be inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame Museum in Dearborn. George Butler, 94, an artist and the oldest living member of Britain's prestigious Royal Watercolor Society, died April 19 in Bakewell, England.
FEATURES
By Vincent Fitzpatrick and Vincent Fitzpatrick,Special to the sun | July 26, 1998
"The Rufus Chronicle: Another Autumn," by C.W. Gusewelle. Ballantine. 217 pages. $19.95. Some men learn about forgiveness by studying the lives of saints," C. W. Gusewelle remarks winningly in "The Rufus Chronicle," his lively account of nearly 13 years, and 12 autumns in the field, with a lively Brittany spaniel. "And some of us keep dogs."A quail hunter and author of five previous books, Gusewelle is an associate editor and columnist with the Kansas City Star, and his columns about Rufus originally appeared there.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 10, 2001
Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird is part civil rights saga, part children's coming-of-age story, part courtroom drama and part suspense tale. The 1962 movie version, with its Academy Award-winning screenplay by Horton Foote, beautifully balanced all these elements. But Christopher Sergel's 90-minute stage adaptation barely breaks the surface, and Timothy Childs' front-and-center direction makes the courtroom speeches feel more like soapbox declarations than impassioned entreaties to judge and jury.
FEATURES
By Vincent Fitzpatrick and Vincent Fitzpatrick,Special to the sun | July 26, 1998
"The Rufus Chronicle: Another Autumn," by C.W. Gusewelle. Ballantine. 217 pages. $19.95. Some men learn about forgiveness by studying the lives of saints," C. W. Gusewelle remarks winningly in "The Rufus Chronicle," his lively account of nearly 13 years, and 12 autumns in the field, with a lively Brittany spaniel. "And some of us keep dogs."A quail hunter and author of five previous books, Gusewelle is an associate editor and columnist with the Kansas City Star, and his columns about Rufus originally appeared there.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1997
"Truman Capote: In Which Various Friends, Enemies, Acquaintances, and Detractors Recall His Turbulent Career," by George Plimpton. Talese/Doubleday. Illustrated. 498 pages. $35.OK, so remarks aren't literature. Still, had Gertrude Stein encountered the literary techniques of George Plimpton, she might have amended that famous bon mot once lobbed to Ernest Hemingway. Remarks are, in fact, biography. Or at least they are when choreographed by the old-pro writer, Paris Review editor, commercial pitchman, actor and literary personage-about-town whose concept of "participatory journalism" is to round up a parade of fellow personages and get them jawing.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
It's the Rodney Dangerfield of confections -- rich, successful, unmistakable and, in some circles, utterly without respect.It's a hallowed family tradition, it's standard late-show humor. It's a business that includes great big bakeries, bit players, high school bands and Trappist monks. It's a seasonal treat, a yearlong guilty habit, a lifelong running joke and a litmus test of family relationships.Ah, fruitcake. To know it is to love it or hate it -- no messing with Mr. or Ms. In-between when it comes to the dense loaf of candied fruit (usually)
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