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By Elizabeth Large | February 11, 1998
Gifts that have a heartWilliams-Sonoma has some heartfelt presents for your Valentine cook, including a heart-shaped Vitantonio waffle iron ($59.95), heart damask linens (napkins are four for $16; tablecloths ($34- $42), cast-iron, heart-shaped muffin tins ($22) and heart butter molds, which work for chocolates, soft cheeses and ice cubes as well ($6.50). Call 800-541-2233 for more information.Chef holds classChef Brian Boston will be teaching a cooking class at the new Milton Inn in Sparks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The season's chilly weather calls for comfort food, but that's no reason to pack on the pounds. After all, spring is right around the corner. We asked local chefs to share their comfort food favorites, lightened up a bit in honor of the season ahead. Many of our chefs gravitated toward seafood, and some added fresh vegetables and herbs. Eat and enjoy! Cyrus Keefer Birroteca 1520 Clipper Road, Baltimore 443-708-1934 bmorebirroteca.com "I've always found pasta comforting," says Cyrus Keefer.
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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 2007
Quick pasta dishes don't always require tomato sauce from a jar. The olive oil and butter in this recipe provide silky texture and great taste while allowing the flavors of the other ingredients to shine through. That's important in this dish, which highlights the wintry, woodsy flavors so welcome now. While this dish calls for a little bacon and some fresh-grated parmesan cheese, it also can be vegan. Skip the meat and forgo the cheese. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 2007
Quick pasta dishes don't always require tomato sauce from a jar. The olive oil and butter in this recipe provide silky texture and great taste while allowing the flavors of the other ingredients to shine through. That's important in this dish, which highlights the wintry, woodsy flavors so welcome now. While this dish calls for a little bacon and some fresh-grated parmesan cheese, it also can be vegan. Skip the meat and forgo the cheese. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The season's chilly weather calls for comfort food, but that's no reason to pack on the pounds. After all, spring is right around the corner. We asked local chefs to share their comfort food favorites, lightened up a bit in honor of the season ahead. Many of our chefs gravitated toward seafood, and some added fresh vegetables and herbs. Eat and enjoy! Cyrus Keefer Birroteca 1520 Clipper Road, Baltimore 443-708-1934 bmorebirroteca.com "I've always found pasta comforting," says Cyrus Keefer.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 18, 2006
"When in doubt, serve meat and potatoes." That's a motto I embrace often when entertaining, if my guest list does not include vegetarians. My spouse, like countless others, swoons when he hears this combination mentioned. He likes almost any variation on the theme. Last month, he was delighted by a creamy potato gratin that I served with a leg of lamb on one occasion and with beef tenderloin on another. He even went off his diet and indulged in seconds. The rich gratin is a remake of a scalloped potato dish I created several years ago. In the original version, I topped layers of sliced potatoes with creme fraiche (a thick French cream that is a cross between heavy and sour cream)
NEWS
By CAROLYN JUNG and CAROLYN JUNG,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | February 22, 2006
Remember when party food meant your mom proudly setting out a Pyrex dish or hollowed-out sourdough round filled with gooey, warm dip, heavy on Best Foods mayonnaise and Philadelphia cream cheese? It may seem so yesterday. It is so not. Because this winter, hot dips are hot. Especially when given a modern flourish with gourmet ingredients such as truffle oil, feta cheese, dried porcini, kalamata olives, fresh Dungeness crab and bacalao (salted cod). Mushroom and Swiss dip boasts a deep, earthy flavor not only from dried porcini, but also from a mix of fresh wild mushrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Good news for lovers of Pappas' famous crab cakes. Pappas Cockeysville (550 Cranbrook Road, 410-666-0030) is now open, in the Cranbrook Shopping Center location where Patrick's used to be. The restaurant and sports bar, from the owners of the original Pappas in Parkville, is open daily from 11 a.m to 11 p.m.   •  Donna's Charles Village (3101 St. Paul St., 410-889-3410, donnas.com) recently extended its hours. The restaurant is now open until 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday and until 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 3, 2010
Just like Hollywood actors and actresses of a certain age, popcorn has had a little work done. A little nip here, a little tuck there, and pretty soon Orville Redenbacher is looking like George Clooney. The classic movie theater treat, a natural for Oscar parties this weekend, has gotten so glammed up that it is making cameos on menus in high-end restaurants. Cooked in duck fat and adorned with truffle oil and truffle sea salt at a North Baltimore bistro. Spiced up with sriracha and tossed into a spinach salad in a Canton eatery.
NEWS
September 2, 2001
Put it on your body, not in your mouth While it may not occur to most of us to groom with our food, it's increasingly becoming the norm. Just take a look at what's available: * The Thymes Olive Leaf Exfoliating Body Polish ($16): The lotion is made from the entire olive (the oil, the leaf and even the pit), which is supposed to have "age-defying" antioxidants. Available online at www.thymes.com. * Alterna Inc.'s White Truffle Shampoo ($65) and Conditioner ($85): More expensive than platinum, Alterna says white truffle oil is rich in B vitamins, which protect hair against breakage.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | February 11, 1998
Gifts that have a heartWilliams-Sonoma has some heartfelt presents for your Valentine cook, including a heart-shaped Vitantonio waffle iron ($59.95), heart damask linens (napkins are four for $16; tablecloths ($34- $42), cast-iron, heart-shaped muffin tins ($22) and heart butter molds, which work for chocolates, soft cheeses and ice cubes as well ($6.50). Call 800-541-2233 for more information.Chef holds classChef Brian Boston will be teaching a cooking class at the new Milton Inn in Sparks.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
After the final bows were taken during Everyman Theatre's inaugural opening night performance of "August: Osage County," an exhuberant yell could be heard from behind the closed curtain. It was an expression of the actors' relief at having survived the challenges posed by playwright Tracy Letts' Tony Award-winning black comedy, "August: Osage County. " And it was an expression of delight in finally having a performing home suitable for an established ensemble theater troupe. That sense of accomplishment was the theme of the theater's official opening this weekend, which included a cocktail party and post-performance cast party on Friday; a gala dinner and performance on Saturday, and a Sunday brunch.
FEATURES
By Ron Ottobre and Ron Ottobre,KNIGHT RIDDER /TRIBUNE | April 11, 2001
I was like a kid on Christmas morning when I headed into a meeting with my chefs recently. It was the passing of winter, however, not its climax, that had me so excited. And it was our gardener, not Santa, who held my wish list - an alphabetized cornucopia of spring produce that my chefs and I could now put on our menu. Asparagus, that edible lily, headed the list. The proud and pointed emblem of spring would at last grace our soups, appetizers, pastas and side dishes. But wait! The gifts continue: baby carrots, green garlic, heirloom beets, new potatoes, rhubarb, Romanesque broccoli and spring onions.
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