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NEWS
December 30, 2003
IF MORE than the usual number of Baltimoreans arrived at work yesterday morning a bit groggy, blame not holiday revelry but the Ravens, who battled until almost midnight Sunday before eking out an overtime victory over the hated Pittsburgh Steelers on a 47-yard field goal. The game did not count - after the Cincinnati Bengals' defeat that afternoon had clinched the Ravens' first division title. But their last regular season contest sure turned out to be an intense, intriguing slugfest, one which fully displayed the true grit of this young team and its coach.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 1, 2012
Unless you have the family on a no-carb diet – and we know how that fad has died out – you probably spend some meal-planning energy on carb-y side dishes to go with protein sources and vegetables. Potatoes, pasta, rice, grains are among the choices. And among the grain-y options we tend to forget are grits. That's right. Grits. The South's answer to Italian polenta. Since we do, in essence, live in the South, you've probably tried had grits for breakfast, but few of us consider fixing them for supper.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 12, 2006
Amid windy conditions that kept half of the White Marlin Open's eligible boats ashore, calm reigned on the leader board as the tournament came to a close in Ocean City yesterday. That was good news for the Hotz family, which gained $1.552 million for their victory in the white marlin competition, which event co-founder Chuck Motzko described as the best in its 33-year history. Known as the largest billfishing tournament in the world, the Open had only 60 boats head out yesterday, deterred by fuel expenses and waves of 6 to 8 feet.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
Despite a driving rain and chilly temperatures at the Women's World Cup semifinal in Monchengladbach, Germany this week, the victory of the American team over the French sent rays of hope to serious and occasional soccer fans around the nation. On Sunday, the American women will play the Japanese team for the World Cup championship. If the Americans are victorious, they will match the accomplishments of the 1999 team, which captured the nation's imagination with its dominant run through the tournament and its exciting final.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
You could do far worse tonight than settle in for an evening of Errol Flynn on TCM. So do it already."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Don't miss this repeat of a landmark in TV history, as Tom Selleck first appears as Courteney Cox's boyfriend (TV Guide says they're TV's sexiest couple). NBC."Essence Awards" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Halle Berry and Sinbad are hosts for this salute to seven African-Americans chosen for their efforts to help young people of all races.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
This year's Oscar nominees carry the heritage of art houses and revival theaters into the mainstream and offer vivid similarities or contrasts to past great art and entertainment. Danny Boyle did spectacularly dextrous work to open up the mind of a canyoneer trapped between a boulder and a rock wall — and determined to escape — in "127 Hours. " Decades ago, Robert Bresson used more austere means to even more indelible effect, conveying the spellbinding concentraion and vaulting faith of a French Resistance fighter who springs himself from a Nazi prison fortress in "A Man Escaped" (1957)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1995
Half-century retrospectives continue to dot the schedule, with two documentaries on the fall of Berlin and a "Biography" study of A-bomb scientist Robert Oppenheimer. One of John Wayne's most popular performances is also on cable.* "NFL Preseason Football" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The Minnesota Vikings and San Diego Chargers open their exhibition schedules as Al Michaels, Dan Dierdorf and Frank Gifford launch a new season of "Monday Night Football," from Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
John Wayne, after spending more than a quarter-century as probably the world's most popular movie star, finally won his Best Actor Oscar for 1969's True Grit (3 p.m., TCM), a revisionist Western in which he got to play a scurrilous, drunken federal marshal whose gruff demeanor does a lousy job of disguising his true heart of gold. This delightfully satisfying exercise in star power features Wayne as one-eyed Rooster Cogburn, hired by spitfire teen-ager Mattie Ross (an embracingly plucky Kim Darby)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
Dribs and drabs from the notebookBaltimore's own "Black Elvis" is hitting the big time.Well, not exactly, but he is appearing on next weekend's Children's Miracle Network Telethon on WMAR, Channel 2. Money raised during the telethon benefits Johns Hopkins' Children's Center.Baltimore's Black Elvis (a k a Tony Dee) -- not to be confused with other Black Elvises from other cities -- is scheduled to perform on the telethon Saturday between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m.And if you watch, keep in mind what the King himself would say if he knew: "Thank you. Thank you very much."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter 'The White Balloon' | March 22, 1996
'Little Indian, Big City'**; PG"Little Indian, Big City" is one of the most successful films ever made in France. Well, what do you expect from a people who think that Jerry Lewis is a god?The movie turns out to be so lightweight it's hard to imagine what all the fuss was about. What would Jacques Barzun say? BTC What about Truffaut? He must be doing cartwheels in his grave.Dubbed into English, the movie's a variation on the old wild-boy-in-the-city theme. Thierry Lhermitte plays a prosperous French businessman who voyages to the Amazon, there to ask the wife who left him 13 years ago to formally sign divorce documents so that he may marry again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
This year's Oscar nominees carry the heritage of art houses and revival theaters into the mainstream and offer vivid similarities or contrasts to past great art and entertainment. Danny Boyle did spectacularly dextrous work to open up the mind of a canyoneer trapped between a boulder and a rock wall — and determined to escape — in "127 Hours. " Decades ago, Robert Bresson used more austere means to even more indelible effect, conveying the spellbinding concentraion and vaulting faith of a French Resistance fighter who springs himself from a Nazi prison fortress in "A Man Escaped" (1957)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 8, 2011
The pre-Super Bowl showdown between the Capitals and the Penguins was significantly lacking sizzle with Pittsburgh stars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin out of the lineup. But that doesn't mean the Capitals' 3-0 win on Sunday wasn't impressive. Pittsburgh had won five straight games without its top two offensive players (Crosby has been out since suffering a concussion against Washington in the Winter Classic and Malkin had missed five games before blowing out his knee in his return last week)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
Julie & Julia," the twinned tale of a groundbreaking cookbook queen, Julia Child (Meryl Streep), and a contemporary blogger, Julie Powell (Amy Adams), proves to be wacky, engaging entertainment. Writer-director Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle") fills it with colorful, mismatched parts. Happily, her fondness for the subject matter seals the rifts. For my money, this movie is by far her spriest and most likable achievement. Child, in heady postwar Paris, enters an all-male class at Le Cordon Bleu and later, with French friends, prepares her chef d'oeuvre.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | February 7, 2009
Sitting there in a black cocktail dress, pearls and high heels, her chestnut hair cascading around her shoulders, Sarah Hemminger is an attractive yet curious figure. Listening to her speak to a prominent group of city leaders, it's hard to believe that this woman with the Hoosier smile is all that she says she is - doctoral candidate in biomedical engineering, founder of a nonprofit mentoring program, den mother to 31 of Baltimore's most challenged teens. But she is all that, and at 28, her accomplishments should impress any astute CEO, strategic community organizer and impassioned do-gooder.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
John Wayne, after spending more than a quarter-century as probably the world's most popular movie star, finally won his Best Actor Oscar for 1969's True Grit (3 p.m., TCM), a revisionist Western in which he got to play a scurrilous, drunken federal marshal whose gruff demeanor does a lousy job of disguising his true heart of gold. This delightfully satisfying exercise in star power features Wayne as one-eyed Rooster Cogburn, hired by spitfire teen-ager Mattie Ross (an embracingly plucky Kim Darby)
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
On the tip of his finger, Matt Lee balances a corn kernel. Candlelight travels through the translucent grain, turning it into a Day-Glo specimen for Lee's discourse on the "anatomy of a grit." The powdery stuff on the kernel's ridge that "looks like a French pedicure" is corn flour, he says. Then, sifting through a cup of coarse, stone-ground corn, Lee finds the "hard, glassy protein part" that comprises grits, along with bits of hull and black specks of stem-ends, where the kernel grew from the cob. When Matt Lee and his brother Ted hold cooking demonstrations to promote their recent cookbook, they make their own grits with a hand grinder and give this same lesson.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
The networks are relying mostly on reruns this week, giving you a second chance to watch some of the year's highlights. But tonight's real gem is that rarity of rarities -- an awards show for people who really deserve awards.* "Kennedy Center Honors" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The best thing about this annual salute to the arts is that it introduces us to genres we're probably not familiar with. You may know all about Sidney Poitier and Neil Simon and B. B. King, but what about diva Marilyn Horne and ballet legend Jacques D'Amboise?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
Julie & Julia," the twinned tale of a groundbreaking cookbook queen, Julia Child (Meryl Streep), and a contemporary blogger, Julie Powell (Amy Adams), proves to be wacky, engaging entertainment. Writer-director Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle") fills it with colorful, mismatched parts. Happily, her fondness for the subject matter seals the rifts. For my money, this movie is by far her spriest and most likable achievement. Child, in heady postwar Paris, enters an all-male class at Le Cordon Bleu and later, with French friends, prepares her chef d'oeuvre.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Legging out a triple, pushing off the pitcher's rubber and pivoting around second base to turn a double play were all things Marriotts Ridge junior John Cruz took for granted, having played baseball since he was 6 years old. But that abruptly changed one afternoon in late September when the 17-year-old was driving home from football practice in a heavy downpour. Cruz didn't see the car that had just turned in front of him on Route 99 until it was too late. He smashed into the back of it, and the next thing he knew he was at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, being treated for an open fracture dislocation of his right ankle.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 12, 2006
Amid windy conditions that kept half of the White Marlin Open's eligible boats ashore, calm reigned on the leader board as the tournament came to a close in Ocean City yesterday. That was good news for the Hotz family, which gained $1.552 million for their victory in the white marlin competition, which event co-founder Chuck Motzko described as the best in its 33-year history. Known as the largest billfishing tournament in the world, the Open had only 60 boats head out yesterday, deterred by fuel expenses and waves of 6 to 8 feet.
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