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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
A couple of hard-edged veteran cops are driving down a desolate Louisiana road after investigating a grisly crime scene in HBO's new Sunday-night drama, “True Detective.” They have been partners for three months but have spoken little about their personal lives. “Ask you something?” the older detective (Woody Harrelson) says. “You a Christian, yeah?” “No,” his partner (Matthew McConaughey) replies, looking out the passenger-side window at the barren landscape.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
I love "Breaking Bad," and even I didn't think it would win as big as it did Monday night at the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards. Best drama, best actor (Bryan Cranston), best supporting actor (Aaron Paul), best supporting actress (Anna Gunn) and best writing (Moira Walley-Beckett). Did show runner Vince Gilligan & Co. ever go out on a high. And it is all the more impressive when you consider the incredible level of competition for each of those awards. I picked it as best drama, and I picked Gunn and Paul as best supporting actress and actor.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 17, 2014
Among the many Baltimore long-timers who had an old, sad anger awakened by the recent mention of Esther Lebowitz in the news was Nick Giangrasso, the detective in charge of the crime scene the day her body was found. "Some cases never leave you," he said, "and that's one of them. The years go by, and something flashes here and there in your memory. " It was 1969, and Giangrasso was a 26-year-old detective. A call came in the middle of a late-September day for a detective to respond to a tree-lined place in Northwest Baltimore that Giangrasso knew as a lover's lane on the edge of Mount Washington, across from Pimlico Race Course . Two police officers had stopped in the shady spot to have lunch in their car; one of them discovered the girl's body in tall grass.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 17, 2014
Among the many Baltimore long-timers who had an old, sad anger awakened by the recent mention of Esther Lebowitz in the news was Nick Giangrasso, the detective in charge of the crime scene the day her body was found. "Some cases never leave you," he said, "and that's one of them. The years go by, and something flashes here and there in your memory. " It was 1969, and Giangrasso was a 26-year-old detective. A call came in the middle of a late-September day for a detective to respond to a tree-lined place in Northwest Baltimore that Giangrasso knew as a lover's lane on the edge of Mount Washington, across from Pimlico Race Course . Two police officers had stopped in the shady spot to have lunch in their car; one of them discovered the girl's body in tall grass.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2014
Just for good measure - to make sure we understand how a homicide detective could become a tortured and isolated human being - viewers of the hottest current drama on HBO were presented with a dead baby in a microwave oven. Actually, the perspective was from inside the oven, from just above the bluish, charred remains of the infant. That way, we were able to see Detective Marty Hart's reaction when he opened the door to have a look. As you might imagine - if "True Detective" can be said to leave anything to the imagination - Woody Harrelson's Hart was pretty upset, so much so that he decided to quit the Louisiana State Police.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
I love "Breaking Bad," and even I didn't think it would win as big as it did Monday night at the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards. Best drama, best actor (Bryan Cranston), best supporting actor (Aaron Paul), best supporting actress (Anna Gunn) and best writing (Moira Walley-Beckett). Did show runner Vince Gilligan & Co. ever go out on a high. And it is all the more impressive when you consider the incredible level of competition for each of those awards. I picked it as best drama, and I picked Gunn and Paul as best supporting actress and actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
There was a strong Baltimore flavor to the nominations for the 2014 Emmys announced today. Baltimore-made "House of Cards," the first non-TV series to win a major Emmy last year, scored in three of the highest categories with nominations for best drama, best actor in a drama (Kevin Spacey) and best actress (Robin Wright). Creator and showrunner Beau Willlimon was nominated for best writing in a drama series, while Carl Franklin is a nominee for his direction. Kate Mara and Reg E. Cathey also earned nominations as best guest actor and actress.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
Prosecutors rested their case against Nathaniel Hurt yesterday, after the accused killer's lawyer and the chief police investigator in the case went head-to-head during a heated cross-examination.Throughout the trial, defense lawyer Stephen L. Miles has accused police of conducting a shoddy or biased investigation into the Oct. 10, 1994, death of 13-year-old Vernon Lee Holmes Jr. Yesterday, given the chance to question the lead detective, Mr. Miles suggested that police ignored evidence indicating Mr. Hurt did not fire the fatal shot.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 27, 1990
On The Weekend Watch:THE HOLIDAY BLUES -- Is anybody else upset every year at the onrush of old episodes of series? They are especially exasperating in shows with continuing story lines. A case in point is "L.A. Law," whose episodes this season have included the sub-plot of the breakup of Stuart and Ann's marriage (Michael Tucker and Jill Eikenberry). Again tonight (at 10, Channel 2) for the second week running, look for the two to be incongruously back together, for the show is from last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | May 13, 2014
At Sunday's Art Outside event, local artists and crafters will gather at Druid Hill Park in a revival of sorts of the city's free al-fresco community art festivals of the 1950s and 1960s. Among the artists will be 28-year-old Brian Behm, also a designer and musician, who returns for the second year to Art Outside (11 a.m.-5 p.m.; artoutsidemd.org ). Behm, who lives in Windsor Hills, said he will showcase some of his large-scale paintings at Art Outside, but will also have for sale some pieces he has been working on recently - sunset scenery and city skyline paintings (go to briancbehm.com for more information)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2014
Just for good measure - to make sure we understand how a homicide detective could become a tortured and isolated human being - viewers of the hottest current drama on HBO were presented with a dead baby in a microwave oven. Actually, the perspective was from inside the oven, from just above the bluish, charred remains of the infant. That way, we were able to see Detective Marty Hart's reaction when he opened the door to have a look. As you might imagine - if "True Detective" can be said to leave anything to the imagination - Woody Harrelson's Hart was pretty upset, so much so that he decided to quit the Louisiana State Police.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
A couple of hard-edged veteran cops are driving down a desolate Louisiana road after investigating a grisly crime scene in HBO's new Sunday-night drama, “True Detective.” They have been partners for three months but have spoken little about their personal lives. “Ask you something?” the older detective (Woody Harrelson) says. “You a Christian, yeah?” “No,” his partner (Matthew McConaughey) replies, looking out the passenger-side window at the barren landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014
He started out as a teenager washing dishes during summer nights at the Jersey Shore, but these days Jordan Miller is busy planning the fancy Baltimore Winter Restaurant Week menu at the French Kitchen inside downtown's Lord Baltimore Hotel. "Restaurant Week gives people the opportunity to explore Baltimore's culinary landscape without going broke," said the 28-year-old New Jersey native who now lives in Charles Village. "If you're like me, you go out to dinner and order pretty much everything on the menu and come home $200 to $300 poorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2005
The Hot Kid By Elmore Leonard. William Morrow. 282 pages. $25. Considering that the early 1930s was a time of depression, lawlessness and would-be nihilism, it seems altogether fitting that one of the most revered crime writers would take on that period and make it his own. Perhaps there's a better fit for Elmore Leonard, but I'd be hard-pressed to think of one more suited to him than what's depicted in The Hot Kid: a colorful tale of gunslinging heroes,...
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