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By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,special to the sun | April 14, 1996
TC "The Price of Experience, Power, Money, Image and Murder in Los Angeles," by Randall Sullivan. Atlantic Monthly Press 705 pages. $27.50 Even the most avid true crime connoisseur is bound to be overwhelmed by the size, complexity and quality of this exhaustive account about the Billionaire Boys Club, the life, times and crimes of Joe Hunt and his elite cohorts.Books in the genre often profess to be describing the "crime of the century" or to be the best since "In Cold Blood." This book does indeed cover in grand style as good a case as is likely to have arisen this close to the year 2000, starring one of the most brilliantly twisted psychopaths ever to be exposed to a criminal courtroom.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | July 12, 2009
This has been a great summer for Maryland books and authors, and just in time for mountain, beach or backporch reading is Ed Okonowicz's True Crime: Maryland. The State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases, published by Stackpole Books. True Crime is a departure for the Elkton author, folklorist, semiretired University of Delaware professor, freelance journalist and storyteller, who with his wife, Kathleen, has published more than 20 books of ghost stories and regional folklore since 1994. "I got to the point I was ghosted out and I needed a change," Okonowicz said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2000
The story of Bridget Cleary is both a fairy tale and a true crime. In 1895, Bridget's horrible fate served as a potent piece of political propaganda against Home Rule for the Irish. In the course of time and continuing tumult, the case had never received the attention it richly deserves. Now, a century later, perhaps coincidentally seduced by the supernatural creatures who created the case, three women academics have come out with two very good books covering the times and trials of the woman from County Tipperary who was burned alive for a fairy changeling.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2007
NEVER ENOUGH Joe McGinniss Simon & Schuster / 358 pages / $25 Joe McGinniss has always been intrigued by the seamy underside of American families, and the Kissel family readily fits that criterion. Gorgeous, vivacious Nancy Kissel, 39, with her svelte, blond looks and ready smile, hardly seems like a murderer. Thus in 2003, when she was arrested for the bludgeoning murder of Robert, her financier husband, who worked for Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch as an investment banker, the expatriate community in Hong Kong - of which the couple was a focal point - was stunned.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and By Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | October 27, 2002
Real-life crime books are always either good or horrible. Cape May Court House by Lawrence Schiller (HarperCollins, 368 pages, $24.95) is one of the good ones. Schiller, an investigative journalist and movie director / producer, has made true crime his specialty, writing about O.J. Simpson, the JonBenet Ramsey murder and spy Robert Hanssen. Now he has turned to a less sensational New Jersey case that has never been closed. Eric Thomas, a dentist in Cape May Court House, N.J., was a passenger in his Ford Explorer when it crashed on a Saturday night in February 1997.
NEWS
By Leslie Walker | May 5, 1991
"White Lies: Rape, Murder and Justice Texas Style" an "Predator: Rape, Madness, and Injustice in Seattle" both are about men wrongly accused of rape, but that's about all these books have in common.Jack Olsen's "Predator" (Pantheon, 402 pages, $23) is formulaic true crime: It offers a seedy profile of a sociopathic loser who eventually confesses to raping more than 50 women, mostly in the Seattle area. Authorities catch the rapist only after they mistakenly prosecute and convict an innocent man. Even though he is exonerated before he serves time in prison, the innocent man's life is shattered.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1995
On-line, there has been no rest for "Sleepers," or its author, Lorenzo Carcaterra.For weeks, the best-selling and controversial memoir about four boyhood friends who literally get away with murder has been dissected and defended, primarily in CompuServe, although other on-line services and the Internet have provided virtual battlefields as well.In one CompuServe forum, true crime writers filed a petition, demanding the book's recall on the ground that it is an incredible fraud masquerading as nonfiction.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 25, 1993
Tatum O'Neal plays a police officer called Bambi charged with the murder of her lover's ex-wife in NBC's "Woman on the Run: The Lawrencia Bembenek Story." Elizabeth Montgomery stars as churchgoing woman who poisons her husband, as well as her boyfriend, in "Black Widow Murders: The Blanche Taylor Moore Story" for NBC.Gary Cole portrays a Vietnam veteran who starts out as a bodyguard and winds up a murderer in "When Love Kills: The Seduction of John Hearn" on CBS. And Tim Roth is a Nebraska teen-ager who takes his 14-year-old girlfriend on a killing spree in ABC's "Murder in the Heartland."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Here's the kind of movie "True Crime" is: Steve Everett (Clint Eastwood), a drunken stumblebum of a reporter who's worn away the patience of every editor he's ever worked for, is hurriedly assigned a death-row interview, and within a few seconds, he's figured out they're gonna fry the wrong guy.Can he prove this guy's innocent, take his young daughter to the zoo and keep from being beaten senseless by the news editor whose wife he's sleeping with, all...
NEWS
July 19, 2002
Jack Olsen, 77, a former sheriff's deputy and journalist who won awards for his true-crime novels, died after suffering a heart attack at his island home near Seattle. Mr. Olsen wrote 31 books on topics ranging from sports to the problems troubling society and had recently finished the first part of a trilogy about his childhood years, said his wife, Su Olsen. She found him dead at their Bainbridge Island, Wash., home Tuesday. Mr. Olsen, a former sheriff's deputy in Gilpin County, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Antonucci and Mike Antonucci,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 18, 2003
Here's a starter's list of a dozen promising games being released by the end of the year. Boktai: The Sun is in Your Hand (this week for Game Boy Advance). A candidate for game of the year. A solar sensor in the game cartridge makes players better vampire hunters when using their GBAs in good sunlight. The vampires are stronger at night. It's an inspired innovation from Konami game designer Hideo Kojima. Age rating: Everyone. Jak II (Oct. 14, PlayStation2). This is an ambitious sequel to 2001's Jak and Daxter, with terrific graphics and clever humor.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
Without warning one March afternoon, Jeremiah Swift clubbed 12-year-old John Hatherly to death with a hoe as they worked in a tobacco field in Elkridge. The 20-year-old Englishman then chased down Hatherly's 10-year-old brother, Benjamin, struck him with the hoe and left him for dead. But Benjamin survived. Swift returned to the Hatherlys' farmhouse and stalked other children of the couple, who were away attending a funeral. Swift, the family's indentured servant, stabbed a 14-year-old daughter and another young son, then grabbed an ax and delivered a fatal blow to her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Leary and Mike Leary,Sun Staff | July 13, 2003
Red Zone: The Behind-the-Scenes Story of the San Francisco Dog Mauling, by Aphrodite Jones. William Morrow. 336 pages. $24.95. The horrific death of Diane Whipple in January 2001, was instant fodder for the tabloids and cable TV -- a former all-American lacrosse player, she was literally torn to shreds by two huge Presa Canario "fighting dogs" in the hallway of her tony apartment building. Neo-Nazis, tattooed convicts, bestiality, the Mexican mafia, Celtic runes and lesbianism all figured in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and By Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | October 27, 2002
Real-life crime books are always either good or horrible. Cape May Court House by Lawrence Schiller (HarperCollins, 368 pages, $24.95) is one of the good ones. Schiller, an investigative journalist and movie director / producer, has made true crime his specialty, writing about O.J. Simpson, the JonBenet Ramsey murder and spy Robert Hanssen. Now he has turned to a less sensational New Jersey case that has never been closed. Eric Thomas, a dentist in Cape May Court House, N.J., was a passenger in his Ford Explorer when it crashed on a Saturday night in February 1997.
NEWS
July 19, 2002
Jack Olsen, 77, a former sheriff's deputy and journalist who won awards for his true-crime novels, died after suffering a heart attack at his island home near Seattle. Mr. Olsen wrote 31 books on topics ranging from sports to the problems troubling society and had recently finished the first part of a trilogy about his childhood years, said his wife, Su Olsen. She found him dead at their Bainbridge Island, Wash., home Tuesday. Mr. Olsen, a former sheriff's deputy in Gilpin County, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,Special to the Sun | July 15, 2001
A Cold Case, by Philip Gourevitch. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 182 pages, $22. New Yorker staff writer Philip Gourevitch, whose first book was a provocative account of the 1994 massacre of 800,000 people during 100 days of genocide in Rwanda, now probes an obscure New York double homicide focusing on the fact that it took 30 years to bring one evildoer to nebulous justice. Lightly switched from the monstrous to the minuscule, Gourevitch's keen insights and skillful reporting continue to captivate.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE HOW TO MAKE AN AMERICAN QUILT. Whitney Otto. Villard. 179 pages. $18 | July 21, 1991
TRUE CRIME.Michael Mewshaw.hTC Poseidon Press.288 pages. $19.95. Tom Heller is the author of several best-selling true-crime books, each one packed with lurid details about murder and mayhem among the very rich. "Some critics call me a muckraker, a carrion bird," he says. But when his own father, Big Tom, is shot and Tom tries to solve the crime, it's the start of an adventure that ultimately gives the writer a new perspective on his slightly unsavory profession.An American expatriate who has spent the last several years living overseas, Tom leaves his wife and kids in Italy and rushes home to Maryland to be with his dad. As Big Tom lies dying in the hospital, the father and son of Tom's long-ago girlfriend are shot and killed at their posh bayside estate.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | July 12, 2009
This has been a great summer for Maryland books and authors, and just in time for mountain, beach or backporch reading is Ed Okonowicz's True Crime: Maryland. The State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases, published by Stackpole Books. True Crime is a departure for the Elkton author, folklorist, semiretired University of Delaware professor, freelance journalist and storyteller, who with his wife, Kathleen, has published more than 20 books of ghost stories and regional folklore since 1994. "I got to the point I was ghosted out and I needed a change," Okonowicz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and By Elsbeth L. Bothe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2000
The story of Bridget Cleary is both a fairy tale and a true crime. In 1895, Bridget's horrible fate served as a potent piece of political propaganda against Home Rule for the Irish. In the course of time and continuing tumult, the case had never received the attention it richly deserves. Now, a century later, perhaps coincidentally seduced by the supernatural creatures who created the case, three women academics have come out with two very good books covering the times and trials of the woman from County Tipperary who was burned alive for a fairy changeling.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Here's the kind of movie "True Crime" is: Steve Everett (Clint Eastwood), a drunken stumblebum of a reporter who's worn away the patience of every editor he's ever worked for, is hurriedly assigned a death-row interview, and within a few seconds, he's figured out they're gonna fry the wrong guy.Can he prove this guy's innocent, take his young daughter to the zoo and keep from being beaten senseless by the news editor whose wife he's sleeping with, all...
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