Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTrue Blue
IN THE NEWS

True Blue

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
More than 50 restaurants have signed onto the Maryland's 'True Blue' certification program and marketing campaign. Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the 'True Blue' certification program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue crab products to use a special logo in marketing or advertising the product. 'True Blue' wasn't so much designed to convert restaurant owners and diners to Maryland crab meat as it was to help diners who want Maryland crab meat find restaurants that serve it. “We're not saying that imported crab meat can't be delicious,” said DNR Fisheries Marketing Director Steve Vilnit when the program was announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
  Governor Martin O'Malley, on behalf of Chesapeake Bay watermen and the True Blue program that promotes Maryland Blue Crab sustainability, accepted a donation of $10,270 from Flying Dog Brewery and Old Bay on Wednesday at the beer company's Frederick taproom.  The money, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston, comes from a portion of proceeds from sales of the Flying Dog Dead Rise beer, which is a collaboration with...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Is your Maryland crab cake true blue? Only a small number of restaurants in Maryland reliably make their crab cakes from local crabmeat, and the state does not require restaurants to identify the specific source of the meat in crab cakes. True Blue, a new  labeling and promotion initiative from The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), hopes to give restaurants that do use Maryland crabmeat a claw up on those that fill their crab cakes with inexpensive imported meat from Indonesia and Venezuela.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Now in its second season, the state's "True Blue" seafood certification program has increased the roster of participating restaurants from 26 to 150, according to Steve Vilnit of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The state launched the labeling and marketing initiative in 2012 to help encourage restaurants to carry Maryland crab meat. Not everyone needed encouragement, though. "We're an 80-year-old Baltimore business, so why wouldn't we support a local industry," said Sebastien Trossman, the executive chef at Alonso's, one of the newer restaurants on the True Blue roster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Is that Maryland crab meat in your crab cake, or is it from parts unknown? Some diners can tell the difference between Maryland and imported crab meat with one bite. Some folks don't care much, but diners who do now have a way of finding restaurants that promise to serve exclusively Maryland crab meat. Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the True Blue program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue crab products to use a special logo in marketing or advertising the product to diners.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | June 8, 2003
Almost 40 years ago in 1966, Father's Day became a national holiday when then President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation making the third Sunday in June a day to honor fathers. Since then, it's been a holiday often marked by food celebrations. That has always been true at our house. As a youngster, our son Michael always loved to help prepare a meal for his dad on this designated Sunday even if things often became overcooked. Last year, Mike became a father himself, so now he will be the object of attention on June 15. Like millions of Americans, our family has always commemorated this occasion by cooking a meal outdoors, and, more often than not, hamburgers have served as the most popular main course at these backyard festivities.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | September 2, 2012
Eat Maryland crab meat and win a prize. Throughout September, diners who eat at restaurants participating in Maryland's True Blue program can win a pair of tickets to the Mermaid's Kiss Oyster Fest, an after-hours celebration of Maryland seafood on Oct. 3 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore . Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the True Blue program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue...
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson | October 8, 1997
Color her tickled.Amber Coffman, the Glen Burnie girl who formed an organization to help the homeless, has been named the "Ultimate Crayola True Blue Hero" and will have a crayon named after her.Amber, 15, was chosen from among 10,000 nominations for the top honor in the Crayola Search for True Blue Heroes. She was honored for her work as the founder and director of Happy Helpers for the Homeless, which has helped more than 26,000 homeless people. She started this work when she was 8 years old.Amber was nominated by Jesse Pittman, 7, of Davidsonville, one of the volunteers.
FEATURES
By Carol Stocker and Carol Stocker,Boston Globe | September 13, 1998
Blue is the color most pursued by gardeners. Yet blue is a mysterious hue with as many personalities as uses. Blue flowers can be tranquil or melancholy, dark as denim or light as the sky, restful as twilight or restless as the sea. They blur boundaries, suggest distant horizons and make gardens look larger.But above all, blue flowers are sought-after."Blue is always the most popular color because it goes with everything," theorizes garden store owner Kathy Tracey. "And because it seems hard to find."
SPORTS
February 16, 1992
Naming namesSports team names were chosen out of admiration and not out of demeaning intentions. However, instead of being proud, some groups interpret the names as being degrading. I can understand their concern if naming conventions were used for negative purposes, but this doesn't seem to be the case.Anyhow, for example, consider the origination of Native American names such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Crow, Blackfoot, etc.William B. HahnWestminsterEnd-zone bluesI, too, am one of the unfortunate football fans stuck in the end zone for the Saints-Dolphins preseason game.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | September 2, 2012
Eat Maryland crab meat and win a prize. Throughout September, diners who eat at restaurants participating in Maryland's True Blue program can win a pair of tickets to the Mermaid's Kiss Oyster Fest, an after-hours celebration of Maryland seafood on Oct. 3 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore . Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the True Blue program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Is that Maryland crab meat in your crab cake, or is it from parts unknown? Some diners can tell the difference between Maryland and imported crab meat with one bite. Some folks don't care much, but diners who do now have a way of finding restaurants that promise to serve exclusively Maryland crab meat. Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the True Blue program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue crab products to use a special logo in marketing or advertising the product to diners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
More than 50 restaurants have signed onto the Maryland's 'True Blue' certification program and marketing campaign. Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the 'True Blue' certification program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue crab products to use a special logo in marketing or advertising the product. 'True Blue' wasn't so much designed to convert restaurant owners and diners to Maryland crab meat as it was to help diners who want Maryland crab meat find restaurants that serve it. “We're not saying that imported crab meat can't be delicious,” said DNR Fisheries Marketing Director Steve Vilnit when the program was announced.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 7, 2012
With crab season upon us, Maryland's "True Blue" campaign is gaining steam.  The Department of Natural Resources launched the marketing push earlier this year to promote crabmeat caught in state waters, which is often shunned by restaurants and markets in favor of cheaper imported meat from Indonesia and Venezuela. While many places tout "Maryland crab cakes" on their menus, it's no secret that they're often simply serving Maryland-style cakes, with a little Old Bay dressing up "come-here" crabmeat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Is your Maryland crab cake true blue? Only a small number of restaurants in Maryland reliably make their crab cakes from local crabmeat, and the state does not require restaurants to identify the specific source of the meat in crab cakes. True Blue, a new  labeling and promotion initiative from The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), hopes to give restaurants that do use Maryland crabmeat a claw up on those that fill their crab cakes with inexpensive imported meat from Indonesia and Venezuela.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Howard County has other places where you can get Mexican food, but a $100 margarita? I don't think so. Azul 17, Columbia's new Mexican restaurant and tequila lounge, offers more than 100 tequilas and 17 signature margaritas. It doesn't give those margaritas away, but none of them costs over $17. However, those who are feeling flush can order one of two other margaritas, which are assembled tableside: the Ultimate Margarita made with Tequila Patron Platinum for $40 or the Rockefeller Margarita made with Tequila Don Julio Real for $100.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 1997
It's a typical Maryland midsummer, and many of our gardens' most stellar performers are in eclipse. The roses are reeling under the one-two punch of heat and Japanese beetles. The spring bulbs and azaleas are a fond memory, and the black-eyed Susans are still waiting in the wings. And the drought and humidity have flowers and gardeners both singing the blues.But the daylily, dependable trouper that it is, is ready for its close-up.Daylilies are, of course, those ubiquitous orange perennials which, lanky and cheerful, flank many a rural roadside.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | April 21, 1991
THE SEA AND SKY INSPIRED DESIGNERS THIS SEASON AS EXPANDING ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS CONTINUED ITS INFLUENCE ON THE FASHION WORLD. REPLACING LAST YEAR'S EARTH TONES ARE BLUES OF EVERY HUE, FROM CLASSIC NAVY TO THE DEEPEST TURQUOISE, SOMETIMES DECORATED WITH FISH OR SEASHELL MOTIFS OR TRIMMED WITH SUCH CLASSIC SPRING DETAILS AS NAUTICAL COLLARS AND BRAIDING.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATO | July 9, 2008
I knew a girl once who taught me to believe in love, no matter how hard I resisted. And then a third baseman ruined it for me. Thanks for nothing, A-Rod. Alex Rodriguez's wife, Cynthia, filed for divorce this week on grounds of "infidelity" and accusations that the 12-time All-Star "emotionally abandoned" her and their two children. "The marriage of the parties is irretrievably broken because of the husband's extramarital affairs and other marital misconduct," according to her petition for dissolution of marriage, which was filed in Miami-Dade County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2008
When considering where to play college lacrosse last year, Severn's Mark Staines showed his true colors. North Carolina, Maryland, Georgetown and Virginia were hoping to land him, but the decision came down to the Cavaliers and the Tar Heels. "He made up his own mind, but I think he figured that in 20 years from now, at the Thanksgiving dinner table, he didn't want to talk about the wrong color blue," said Ron Staines Sr., Mark's father. It should come as no surprise that the powder blue of North Carolina won out. That's because Mark has three older brothers -- Ronnie, Billy and Ben -- who all played at Chapel Hill.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.