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NEWS
By Matthew Buck | December 4, 2000
AS WE FUMBLE around down here with a messy political morass, Americans should take note of the national election that occurred north of the border a week ago. In electing Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his Liberals to a third term, a solid majority of Canadians remained true to their hearts and chose to uphold the values and philosophy that have successfully guided their nation throughout the modern era. Yanks who pay a proper amount of attention to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
If you don't think TV is in the midst of revolutionary change, go to Amazon.com this weekend and instead of buying a book or baby food, take a look at the online giant's original production of "Alpha House. " It's a political satire written and produced by "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau starring John Goodman and Clark Johnson. It's set in a house on Capitol Hill that four Republican members of the U.S. Senate share, and the first three episodes can be streamed for free this week.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | May 26, 2007
At Goucher College's graduation ceremony yesterday, Doonesbury creator Garry Trudeau apologized to the Class of 2007 for representing yet another baby boomer peddling wisdom to the micro-managed children his generation has produced. "It must at times seem to your generation that mine will never get off the stage," the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist said to about 275 graduating students. "Don't despair," Trudeau said. He quoted some reassurance he received decades earlier from a mentor, when the politically charged Doonesbury was being dumped by "stuffy, out of touch" newspaper publishers: "Sooner or later, these guys die."
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Ouch! Apparently the truth hurts, as evidenced by the visceral reaction to last week's "Doonesbury" cartoons. The strip dealt honestly and pulled no punches about the utter hypocrisy and lack of morals of the so-called "right to life" zealots. They're upset that Gary Trudeau dared to utter the truth about anti-abortion fanatics - that they don't so much hate abortion as they hate women, especially women who refuse to live their lives barefoot, pregnant and chained to a stove.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Owens | October 6, 2000
MONTREAL -- In 1968, when most Baltimore teen-agers were still suffering from the lingering effects of Beatlemania, I came down with a severe case of another affliction: Trudeaumania. Defined as a wild enthusiasm for Pierre Elliot Trudeau, the dashing new prime minister of Canada, my symptoms appeared after my annual visit to see my Canadian grandparents in Ontario. Thousands of Canadian women had it, but back in Baltimore I think I can safely say that I was the only 13-year-old with a giant poster of Trudeau, rather than a rock star, decorating my room.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
THE CANADA that we see from south of the border is bilingual and multicultural coast-to-coast. It has its own constitution with its version of a bill of rights. It goes its own way in foreign policy, often as United Nations peace-keepers. Canada was not always that way. Pierre Elliott Trudeau introduced all this while prime minister from 1968 to 1979 and 1980 to 1984. It was not easy to achieve. Many English-and French-speaking Canadians were dragged along kicking and screaming. But his vision of Canada was the only alternative in Quebec to a language-, heritage- and religion- based provincialism, rebelling against second-class citizenship, which would have destroyed Canada for something else that, even now, is difficult to imagine.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
Today's Doonesbury comic strip contains an image that might strike some readers as inappropriate, given recent events in Iraq. The strip, which was drawn in April, contains one frame with a character's head on a platter. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau said the beheading of an American citizen, Nicholas Berg, in Iraq earlier this month now has made his previously drawn image "clearly inappropriate." The Sun, like most newspapers, prints its Sunday comics weeks in advance of their distribution.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Trudeau is hero but not starterBackup QB enjoys moment in the sunFor the moment, Jack Trudeau is the darling of Indianapolis. But when the Colts take the field at the Hoosier Dome on Sunday against the Phoenix Cardinals, the darling of Indianapolis will assume a low-profile position on the sideline. He will be a backup quarterback again.Trudeau, a seven-year NFL veteran, accepts his subordinate role to franchise quarterback Jeff George, albeit reluctantly."It's hard to sit down when you know you're playing real well, when basically you know you helped get the team on a three-game winning streak," he said this week.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The melodrama that haunts the Indianapolis Colts already read like bad Hollywood fiction after three weeks of the season:The grizzled coach was under siege.The hot-shot quarterback was under the gun.The recalcitrant running back was under suspension.Into that boiling pot stepped Jack Trudeau yesterday, cool, calm and protected.It was somehow fitting that Trudeau, a backup quarterback, would provide momentary relief in the Colts' season of angst. Indianapolis' 24-23, come-from-behind victory over the staggering Philadelphia Eagles at Veterans Stadium was clearly a study in role reversal.
SPORTS
By Hank Gola and Hank Gola,New York Daily News | December 14, 1992
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Mike Ditka he isn't. So when Indianapolis Colts coach Ted Marchibroda yanked Jeff George and found his quarterback protesting yesterday, he turned the other cheek and continued to turn to the other arm.In the end, Marchibroda's tolerance and intuition were rewarded as Jack Trudeau threw the deciding TD pass in a 10-6 win over the New York Jets.L Maybe that's why Marchibroda has lasted 30 years in the NFL."I guess the word is 'upset,' " Marchibroda said of George. "I knew he would be and I hoped that he would be. I didn't want him to be happy.
NEWS
September 15, 2009
Taxes, and government, should be limited to essentials In a letter from Brent McKee of Arnold on Aug. 20, "Anti-tax ideology indicates a selfish platform," I am satirically taken to task. The thrust of Mr. McKee's letter insinuates that I am opposed to all taxes. This is ridiculous and is neither the case with me nor with the patriots protesting excessive government spending across our great country. What Mr. McKee left out was the context of my "taxes bad" commentary. In reality, my comment was in response to a reporter about what advice I would give to some of my colleagues in the Democrat majority in Annapolis who are advocating raising taxes yet again.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | May 26, 2007
At Goucher College's graduation ceremony yesterday, Doonesbury creator Garry Trudeau apologized to the Class of 2007 for representing yet another baby boomer peddling wisdom to the micro-managed children his generation has produced. "It must at times seem to your generation that mine will never get off the stage," the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist said to about 275 graduating students. "Don't despair," Trudeau said. He quoted some reassurance he received decades earlier from a mentor, when the politically charged Doonesbury was being dumped by "stuffy, out of touch" newspaper publishers: "Sooner or later, these guys die."
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2004
There was nothing funny about Doonesbury last Sunday. The names of 700 American soldiers killed in Iraq filled six panels of the comic strip - a somber roll call of the fallen in a section of the newspaper where we also learned Cathy was having trouble fitting into her bathing suit and Garfield's owner has a lousy love life. But while the strip may have been out of place on the funnies page, it was not out of character for Doonesbury, which has always pushed the boundaries of what comics can be to make readers think before they laugh.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
Today's Doonesbury comic strip contains an image that might strike some readers as inappropriate, given recent events in Iraq. The strip, which was drawn in April, contains one frame with a character's head on a platter. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau said the beheading of an American citizen, Nicholas Berg, in Iraq earlier this month now has made his previously drawn image "clearly inappropriate." The Sun, like most newspapers, prints its Sunday comics weeks in advance of their distribution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Stossel and Scott Stossel,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Among the many rareified accomplishments to which the cartoonist Garry Trudeau can lay claim -- a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, a cartoon strip that runs in more than 1,400 newspapers, a 20-year marriage to Jane Pauley -- perhaps the most revealing is this one: Trudeau is surely the only person to have had one of his books prefaced with an essay by the arch-conservative William F. Buckley Jr. (Doonesbury's Greatest Hits: A Mid-Seventies Revue, Holt,...
NEWS
By Matthew Buck | December 4, 2000
AS WE FUMBLE around down here with a messy political morass, Americans should take note of the national election that occurred north of the border a week ago. In electing Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his Liberals to a third term, a solid majority of Canadians remained true to their hearts and chose to uphold the values and philosophy that have successfully guided their nation throughout the modern era. Yanks who pay a proper amount of attention to...
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 7, 1996
Garretson Beekman Trudeau, who calls himself Garry and signs his work "G.B. Trudeau," graduate of St. Paul's School and Yale and descendant of the man for whom New York City's Beekman Place was named, has just produced his sixty-first outraging book: "Flashbacks: Twenty-Five Years of Doonesbury -What a Long Strange Strip It's Been" (Andrews and McMeel. 332 pages. $18.95).I like the book, intemperately. In his quarter-century peregrination of the superhighway of American life, Mr. Trudeau leaves no turn unstoned.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 1, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The Philadelphia Eagles and coach Buddy Ryan have repeated a Super Bowl mantra for four seasons, trying to convince themselves and their opponents they were the bullies from the East, come to plunder a championship.But, after yesterday's game at Veterans Stadium, the mantra sounded hollow. The Eagles lost to the Indianapolis Colts, 24-23, as quarterback Jack Trudeau completed a two-minute drill with a 6-yard touchdown pass to Bill Brooks and Dean Biasucci kicked the extra point with no time remaining.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Owens | October 6, 2000
MONTREAL -- In 1968, when most Baltimore teen-agers were still suffering from the lingering effects of Beatlemania, I came down with a severe case of another affliction: Trudeaumania. Defined as a wild enthusiasm for Pierre Elliot Trudeau, the dashing new prime minister of Canada, my symptoms appeared after my annual visit to see my Canadian grandparents in Ontario. Thousands of Canadian women had it, but back in Baltimore I think I can safely say that I was the only 13-year-old with a giant poster of Trudeau, rather than a rock star, decorating my room.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
THE CANADA that we see from south of the border is bilingual and multicultural coast-to-coast. It has its own constitution with its version of a bill of rights. It goes its own way in foreign policy, often as United Nations peace-keepers. Canada was not always that way. Pierre Elliott Trudeau introduced all this while prime minister from 1968 to 1979 and 1980 to 1984. It was not easy to achieve. Many English-and French-speaking Canadians were dragged along kicking and screaming. But his vision of Canada was the only alternative in Quebec to a language-, heritage- and religion- based provincialism, rebelling against second-class citizenship, which would have destroyed Canada for something else that, even now, is difficult to imagine.
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