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By Peter Hermann and Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Sitting in a wheelchair at a nursing home, Brian Buber can't recall the instant 17 years ago when tons of screaming metal came rocketing toward him on the Capital Beltway, scattering fellow construction workers and crushing their paving equipment. In 1997, a civil jury found Hanover-based Gunther's Leasing Transport Inc. negligent in the accident, which killed one person and injured seven, awarding them nearly $16 million in damages and medical expenses. Buber, 49, crippled and with severe brain damage, received some insurance money but "never saw a penny" of the $13 million earmarked by the jury for his care, says his stepfather, Bob Buber.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A Pennsylvania trucking company said Monday it has opened a new facility in Elkridge, where it expects to add more than 100 jobs over the next two years. The 33,000-square-foot complex in Howard County is the only one in the Baltimore region for A. Duie Pyle, a family-owned business founded in 1924 that is looking to expand into the local market and Virginia. About 65 people are employed at the Brookdale Drive facility, most of them truckers, said John Luciani, vice president for terminals.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Marvin T. Haw III, who had held administrative positions with several heavy equipment and trucking companies, died Jan. 26 of a heart attack at his Timonium home. He was 75. Mr. Haw was born in St. Louis and raised in Bonne Terre, Mo., and West Lafayette, Ind., where he graduated in 1955 from West Lafayette High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1959 from the University of Missouri and later attended graduate school at the university.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
I read your editorial about the safety of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and found it laughable ( "Risking the bridge," July 24). First, you can not politicize physics, whose laws are immutable. In the effort to get better fuel economy auto manufacturers have been making lighter cars. And trucking companies have been putting longer, heavier rigs on the road than when the bridge was built. What does all this mean? A long heavy truck hitting a light car will impart a great deal of energy to the car. The Jersey walls are curved from bottom to top, so when hit by vehicle's wheel, the curve carries the whole vehicle upward along the curve.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Last week, safety advocates petitioned the federal government to reconsider a recent decision to allow truckers to work longer hours. The new regulations deserve more than reconsideration; they ought to be completely dismissed as a regrettable four-year experiment by the Bush administration. Truckers used to be limited to driving no more than 10 hours straight, but in 2004, the industry successfully lobbied to have them expanded on an interim basis to 11 hours. Has the 11th hour made the roads more dangerous?
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
More than 140 Marylanders lost their jobs yesterday as one of the nation's largest trucking companies shut down after losing a three-year battle with a sagging economy and nonunion competitors.Workers at St. Johnsbury Trucking Co. terminals in Jessup and Hyattsville were among the company's 4,100 employees throughout the Northeast who were laid off following weeks of speculation that the company would close or be taken over, much like the Eastern Shore's Preston Trucking Corp. last year."There allegedly were other companies looking at us prior to our going out," said David Crean, St. Johnsbury's regional manager, who supervised 800 workers at 13 terminals in four states, including Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | April 8, 1994
A nationwide Teamsters strike against 22 trucking companies entered its second day as a dockworkers union asked members to honor truckers' picket lines.Leaders of the International Longshoremen's Association made the request yesterday of its 80,000 members, who load freight from ships along the Great Lakes, the Eastern seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico. The move came at the request of the Teamsters and followed the unraveling of management's united front.Yesterday, management negotiators told 18 of the 23 trucking firms it represents that they were free to sign interim agreements with the Teamsters union.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 7, 2001
The Bush administration indicated yesterday that it would reverse a Clinton administration policy and begin allowing Mexican trucks to haul goods throughout the United States, despite concerns about the trucks' safety. Administration officials disclosed the plan on the same day that a dispute resolution panel ruled that the United States was violating the North American Free Trade Agreement by not already allowing Mexican trucks to enter. "The president has said that Nafta trucking provisions should be implemented, and we intend to do that," said Clair Buchan, a White House spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Most of the 89 employees at Consolidated Freightways Corp.'s Baltimore terminal were scrounging for new jobs yesterday after the Vancouver, Wash.-based trucking company decided to shut down its U.S. operations on Labor Day, putting about 15,500 Teamsters out of work nationwide. William Alexander, president of Teamsters Local 557, called the company's decision to shutter the terminal on Labor Day "a slap in the face." Alexander spent much of yesterday morning on the phone, helping former Consolidated drivers and dockworkers find work with other union trucking companies in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By JANE APPLEGATE | August 31, 1992
Nearly every day, Donald Carnahan and his clients profit from someone else's mistakes. One recent Monday, he was smiling at a pile of checks worth about $15,000.Mr. Carnahan is president and owner of Associated Traffic Services, a Covina, Calif.-based firm that audits freight bills and provides consulting services to big and small businesses.He and his staff of nine review about 40,000 freight bills a month, usually finding some kind of mistake on each one. And, when they do, his firm earns half of the money they collect from trucking companies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Federal regulators and state police plan a wide-ranging review of the waste-removal company owned by the trucker seriously hurt when a CSX train collided with his truck at a crossing. The company, Alban Waste, had been flagged in the past for safety violations. Because of Tuesday's accident in Rosedale, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and state police plan a top-to-bottom compliance audit. Officials said they would vet the trucking company, its drivers and vehicles for any violations that had gone undetected in previous reviews.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
The owner of an Anne Arundel County trucking company put out of business late last year by federal safety officials has filed for bankruptcy protection again, listing more than $3.3 million in debt. Mark David Gunther Sr., owner of Harmans-based Gunthers Transport LLC, filed under Chapter 11 in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore on May 15. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration called Gunthers Transport an "imminent hazard" to the public when it ordered the company's trucks off the road on Nov. 16. When the company tried to reconstitute itself weeks later as Clock Transport LLC, it, too, was ordered closed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Marvin T. Haw III, who had held administrative positions with several heavy equipment and trucking companies, died Jan. 26 of a heart attack at his Timonium home. He was 75. Mr. Haw was born in St. Louis and raised in Bonne Terre, Mo., and West Lafayette, Ind., where he graduated in 1955 from West Lafayette High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1959 from the University of Missouri and later attended graduate school at the university.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
The nation's top trucking regulators said Wednesday that their agency is moving to prevent companies that have been shut down for repeated safety violations from staying in business by changing their names, a recurring problem in the industry. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is upgrading its screening of applicants seeking to operate trucking companies, agency officials said. It has proposed rules to replace three independent application systems with a single, more easily monitored site.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Federal regulatory officials moved quickly to shut down an Anne Arundel County trucking company that opened at the same address as a freight hauler closed this month by authorities who cited a number of safety violations and seven crashes in the past year. Clock Transport LLC opened weeks before federal authorities shut down Gunthers Transport LLC. Both companies listed the same address on Railroad Avenue in Hanover, and the head of Clock was listed in state and federal documents as the son of the head of Gunthers Transport.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Weeks before federal trucking regulators ordered Gunthers Transport LLC off the road for being an "imminent hazard" to the public, the owner's son filed the paperwork to create a new entity: Clock Transport LLC. The new trucking company, which shares the Hanover address of Gunthers Transport, was cited for a safety violation last month. One of its trucks failed an inspection in Ohio, which sidelined the vehicle and driver until the problems were fixed. Maryland State Police said Monday that their troopers have been ordered to pull over and inspect trucks bearing either name.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
I read your editorial about the safety of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and found it laughable ( "Risking the bridge," July 24). First, you can not politicize physics, whose laws are immutable. In the effort to get better fuel economy auto manufacturers have been making lighter cars. And trucking companies have been putting longer, heavier rigs on the road than when the bridge was built. What does all this mean? A long heavy truck hitting a light car will impart a great deal of energy to the car. The Jersey walls are curved from bottom to top, so when hit by vehicle's wheel, the curve carries the whole vehicle upward along the curve.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1999
The people managing Baltimore's marine terminals and rail yards feel a headache coming on, and union boss James P. Hoffa is making it happen.The newly elected president of the Teamsters is negotiating his first national contract -- for 12,000 workers in the car-hauling business. He says the negotiations will prove that "the Teamsters are back," and is promising to "shut this industry down" if talks don't go his way.But in Baltimore, the car-hauling industry is a staple of domestic and international commerce.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
Sitting in a wheelchair at a nursing home, Brian Buber can't recall the instant 17 years ago when tons of screaming metal came rocketing toward him on the Capital Beltway, scattering fellow construction workers and crushing their paving equipment. In 1997, a civil jury found Hanover-based Gunther's Leasing Transport Inc. negligent in the accident, which killed one person and injured seven, awarding them nearly $16 million in damages and medical expenses. Buber, 49, crippled and with severe brain damage, received some insurance money but "never saw a penny" of the $13 million earmarked by the jury for his care, says his stepfather, Bob Buber.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Edgar Wilford Weal Jr., a retired trucking company executive and co-founder of an Ellicott City ice cream shop, died June 17 of heart failure at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pigtown, Mr. Weal was a 1935 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He attended the old Baltimore College of Commerce and enlisted in the Army in 1941. After graduating from officer candidate school and earning his commission, Mr. Weal served in Europe and stateside.
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