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Truck Traffic

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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
There's not much the City of Westminster can do about truck traffic through a narrow alley that runs past Schaeffer Lumber Co. to West George Street, a two-member City Council committee has concluded.The Public Improvements Committee's decision to take no action left Gloria and Richard MacPhee, who own a rental house at 20 W. George St. next to the alley, "a little nonplused," the couple said in a statement.Mr. and Mrs. MacPhee of Finksburg had asked the council for help in October. They said their tenants in the Westminster house are inundated with diesel fumes and noise from truck traffic that begins at 7 a.m. and continues throughout the day.Truck traffic through the alley includes tractor-trailers that deliver supplies to Schaeffer Lumber Co. and flatbed trucks that pick up items from the company's materials storage yard, which adjoins the alley on the opposite side of George Street.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
All lanes going through the Ft. McHenry Tunnel have reopened after overturned box truck and fuel leak closed part of the tunnel Thursday afternoon during rush hour. The lanes reopened around 7 p.m. The truck flipped over around 4 p.m. heading southbound in the tunnel, and police helped cars back out of the tunnel, officials said. The tunnel carries traffic on I-95 under Baltimore's harbor near the downtown exits. Officials did not immediately know a cause of the accident. lbroadwater@baltsun.com Twitter.com/lukebroadwater
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | February 6, 1991
In less than 30 minutes Sunday morning, the town lost a century-old part of its history.Much to the dismay of residents who want to preserve the town's past, the walls of 302 E. Main St. came tumbling down to make room for increased truck traffic.Under a $3,260 contract with the state, John Baran bulldozed the house at Main Street and Route 75. Its location brought about its demise.The State Highway Administration had purchased the house fromRichard M. Warehime for $110,000. Several traffic studies, the accident history of the intersection and the number of complaints left SHA with no choice but destruction, said Stephen N. Clarke Jr., state right of way agent.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
City and state officials are re-evaluating their approach to a proposed railroad cargo facility in Southwest Baltimore, acknowledging that their initial response to community concerns fell flat. The public backlash stalled the CSX Corp. project, which is nearly a year behind schedule, and created tension between local officials, who are collaborating on bringing a project considered critical to the port of Baltimore to fruition, according to interviews and internal email. "It's a difficult project.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
Relief for highway traffic congestion may soon be just a few computer bytes away.Aiming to move truck traffic more efficiently, the state Department of Transportation unveiled yesterday a computerized inspection system that allows a truck to be weighed in Maryland and not have to stop for another inspection anywhere on the East Coast."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Mary Gail Hare and Sheridan Lyons and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
The state will contribute $3.5 million toward a road-and-rail improvement in Union Bridge -- aimed at improving access for businesses while helping residents by reducing heavy truck traffic.Local and private money will cover the balance of the $5.5 million project that will provide a new road to the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. and a new Maryland Midland Railway Co. spur. The spur will mean removing railroad tracks through town, the state Department of Transportation announced yesterday."It's great," said Union Bridge Mayor Perry L. Jones.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
A Sykesville resident urged the County Commissioners yesterday to put speed bumps and a three-way stop sign on Monroe Avenue near the site where two teen-age cousins were killed in a car accident last month.Nimrod Davis, who lives near the scene of the accident, gave the commissioners a petition "signed by at least 95 percent of the people on the street" asking for the "traffic-calming devices" and a ban on through truck traffic.He said the county has created "a traffic monstrosity" in the Eldersburg area by trying to reduce traffic on major arteries such as Routes 26 and 32 and directing it to side streets such as Monroe Avenue.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
Representatives of the trucking industry vowed during a public hearing last night to fight the State Highway Administration's proposal to ban some heavy trucks from Routes 424 and 450 through Crofton.Some residents displayed "Ban the Trucks" signs and said the vehicles pose a safety hazard in an area that has exploded with residential growth.A divided audience of more than 100 applauded speakers on both sides of the issue during the hearing at Crofton Middle School.The SHA proposal would bar trucks weighing more than 26,000 pounds from Route 424 between Route 3 and U.S. 50 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; and bar the trucks from Route 450 between Route 3 and Route 424 during those same hours.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has decided to ban heavy trucks from driving through Southeast Baltimore's waterfront communities, but even supporters of the move fear it will only push the displaced truck traffic into other neighborhoods.The decision, which went into effect Monday, means that tractor-trailers are permanently banned from driving through a zone created on a trial basis in February. The zone is bounded by President Street to the west, Conkling and Fagley streets to the east, Eastern Avenue to the north and Boston Street and the waterfront to the south.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
New Windsor Town Council has vetoed a proposed truck route that proponents said would have eased traffic woes in Carroll's smallest town.With state bypass money a pipe dream, Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. and Steve Horn, county transportation planner, proposed a three-quarter-mile road connecting Route 31 to Route 75 at the north end of town."
NEWS
December 11, 2013
The Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation [MALPF] Board has recently enacted a new "Non-Traditional Uses" program for farms in this program. It allows current and future landowners to operate what I consider commercial-industrial operations. These include private air strips, saw mill-lumber kiln, livestock slaughtering facility, firewood, mulch processing and more. Now less-expensive Agricultural Land can be purchased by large commercial-industrial corporations. It can be used for commercial-industrial use at less than commercially industrially zoned land while paying lower Ag taxes.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2012
Editor: I wanted to let you know that I am very concerned about the proposal to locate a Waste Transfer Facility in the 800 block of Philadelphia Road in Joppa. Numerous people living near the site have written to me expressing their concern and at times their outrage over the facility being placed in this location. They are worried about how so many large trash trucks coming and going will safely navigate that section of Philadelphia Road which is already very busy. They are concerned about noise, dust and potential contamination. Of course they are afraid their property values will plummet.  I couldn't state more strongly that their concerns must be addressed and their questions answered to the fullest. One family who owns a home and property next to the proposed site has lived in their home for over 50 years. The couple says they are heartbroken to think they must spend their retirement years dealing with all the problems they anticipate will come with a trash facility located so close to their home.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 3, 2012
Editor: Please consider printing my letter to the editor. Although I am a resident of Jarrettsville, I have been following with great interest the coverage of the proposed transport station for Route 7 in Joppa. I travel daily on this road and heartily agree with the residents who say that this road cannot handle any more traffic. Traveling Route 7 has always been a much more pleasurable drive than taking I-95. Why can't it remain a scenic alternative to the busier highways of Route 40 and I-95?
NEWS
March 30, 2011
I am the owner of Garrett County's oldest land and water adventure company. Our eco tourism business will be a joke if everywhere we turn there are trucks, smells, bad water, gas wells, compressor stations and gas pipelines crisscrossing our forested mountains. My wife and I own a home in Garrett County and have lived in this home on the banks of the Youghiogheny River Wild and Scenic River Corridor for almost 20 years. One of the first natural gas wells using the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technique is scheduled to begin just outside of our small town, and the first horizontal gas fracking shaft is coming within 500 feet of my front door and just across our beautiful wild and scenic river.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
The State Highway Administration closed one of the two bridges leading into Ocean City to truck traffic Wednesday afternoon after inspectors found deterioration of one of the girders that supports the structure. Highway Administrator Neil J. Pedersen said he ordered the emergency restrictions, which will bar vehicles heavier than 6,000 pounds from the Route 90 bridge, after receiving recommendations from staff and consulting engineers. He said the bridge remains safe for passenger vehicle traffic but that anything larger than a pickup truck would be diverted to the U.S. 50 bridge.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2005
LOS ANGELES - The twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began operating on weekends and evenings yesterday in an initiative designed to ease Southern California's worst-in-the-nation traffic congestion and smog. By expanding beyond regular Monday-through-Friday business hours, officials hope to reduce the ports' tangle of shipping trucks, which would also cut exhaust emissions released when the vehicles sit in stalled traffic. "The economic benefits [of the port] are not without a cost to our quality of life," Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said yesterday as he described the program while trucks revved in the distance.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
If the Carroll County commissioners don't do something to stop trucks from speeding down Klees Mill Road, a fatal accident will occur there one day, residents living along the South Carroll road insist. Lee Strayer said his wife often returns home trembling because trucks bear down on her at tremendous speeds as she drives down a hill to their house. "She's afraid they're going to run her over," Strayer told the commissioners this week. Commissioner Donald I. Dell said it might be unfair to restrict commercial truck traffic because of residents' concerns.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Some truckers are fuming because Baltimore City has experimentally banned through-trucks from Fells Point and Canton. For two weeks, police have been writing warnings to truckers caught in an area bounded by President Street, Eastern Avenue, Fagley Street and Boston Street. From now on, violators will be issued a $50 ticket."It's totally unfair," protests Pam Smith, who operates a trucking firm with her husband, Curley. To save money and avoid paying a $4 toll each way in the Fort McHenry Tunnel, their trucks have been hauling cargo through Inner Harbor and East Baltimore streets.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
Maryland's secretary of transportation arrived in New Windsor yesterday with news of a $3.4 million bypass, a road that would relieve truck traffic, enhance safety and cut down the noise in the western Carroll County town of 1,400. The persistent background noise from hefty 18-wheelers cranking gears, spewing exhaust and trying to maneuver the turn at High and Main streets nearly drowned out Robert L. Flanagan's remarks. When a 55-foot- long milk hauler nearly jumped the curve behind his podium, Flanagan asked, "Did somebody arrange this?"
NEWS
September 11, 2002
John Andrew Bagley, a retired traffic manager, died of respiratory failure Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 79 and had lived in Bel Air for the past seven years. Mr. Bagley was a traffic manager at Smith's Transfer, Roadway and other Baltimore-based truck lines until he retired 12 years ago. Born in Baltimore and raised on Rueckert Avenue, where he lived until moving to Bel Air, he was a graduate of St. Dominic and St. James the Less parochial schools. During World War II, he served in the Army in an engineering battalion in France and Germany.
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