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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
The Maryland Chapter of Trout Unlimited has come up with a tournament fundraiser that should be a lot of fun and of great benefit to Jones Falls upstream from Stevenson Road.On Sept. 25, MDTU will hold the First Annual Gunpowder Benefit Trout Fishing Contest, which will pair 15 contestants with trout fishermen who regularly fish the Gunpowder.The tournament will cost each contestant a $100 tax deductible donation to MDTU, and each contestant will fish a different part of the Gunpowder.Prizes -- including a $325 Sage or Scott Fly rod for top prize -- will be awarded for largest fish, most fish, most flies lost in trees, most fish missed, biggest fish story, etc.Fly and spin fishermen are welcome to enter, but all must use barbless hooks and release the fish they catch.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Tucked amid the woods of northern Baltimore County is one of Maryland's natural gems - the Big Gunpowder Falls, a nationally renowned trout stream that draws anglers from far and wide to try their skills and luck in the cold, rushing water. But some fishermen and fishing guides say they're having a harder time getting at this prized outdoor resource - though it's publicly accessible in Gunpowder Falls State Park - because of unusually heavy river flows that make it hard to fish or even stand at times in the water.
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NEWS
By BILL BURTON | November 3, 1991
Trout Unlimited is coming to Carroll County, and with it is coming that prominent conservation group's focus on the cold-water fisheries of Central Maryland.Also coming is Lefty Kreh, internationally known fly fisherman and author who for 19 years was outdoor columnist for The Sun. In retirement, he conducts guided fishing tours anywhere in the world for Frontiers International of Wexford, Pa.Kreh will be the keynote speaker at the county-based chapter's inaugural meeting at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20 in the Iroquois Building of Hashawha Environmental Appreciation Center near Westminster.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
NEWS
By Bill Burton | February 9, 1992
As hatchery trucks prepare to roll across the state, Carroll County's new Trout Unlimited Chapter is hatching some ambitious ideas of itsown.Native trout -- brooks, browns and rainbows -- are spawning increasingly in natural fashion, and they're boosted in their effortsby organized angling buffs such as members of TU and individual fishermen volunteering time for restoration and improvement projects. TheDepartment of Natural Resources and other state groups also are helping.Despite suburban and country development, and probably more troutchasers than ever, Maryland's trout fishing picture is brighter thanever, and the new Patapsco Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited is helping.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | April 25, 1993
"Welcome back to Patapsco Valley Trout Unlimited," Dan Meyer said, greeting more than 30 area trout fishing fans at this month's chapter meeting. "After an inactive summer and fall, this TU is back in business and here to stay."The chapter, which represents Carroll County, was founded in November 1991, but, as Mike Boyle told me, "things got kind of untracked for a time."The original thrust of the organization's efforts were to be aimed at the East Branch of the Patapsco, but though some valuable work was done, interest lagged when various degrees of opposition developed because of private ownership of lands along the river.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | October 15, 1995
LOOK WITH HOPE along the eager stream that twists through the pastures of the DeFord farm in the clear sunlight of a fall afternoon and you can almost see the brown trout swimming by.It may take a few years, God and nature willing, for this mile-long winding stretch of Long Green Creek to recover its status as a natural fishery, lost over the years to agricultural runoff and erosion of cattle grazing.But the process is getting a lot of human help from efforts of Trout Unlimited and the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay.Those two conservation groups will be training volunteers in replanting stream banks and buffer zones on the Hydes, Md., property this Saturday in what is hoped to become a model demonstration of riparian restoration on private lands.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1999
The diverse worlds of offshore and inshore sport fishing come indoors on Jan. 23 when Salt Water Sportsman magazine brings its national seminar series to College Park.The six-hour program will feature senior editor George Poveromo, publisher-at-large Spider Andresen and a group of top-notch Chesapeake Bay and coastal captains.The courses are designed to cover the how, where and why of catching game fish from the offshore canyons to the upper Chesapeake using the latest techniques, tackle and strategies.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
Steve Barnhart of Finksburg volunteers with the Patapsco Valley chapter of Trout Unlimited, an organization with 80,000 members nationwide whose mission is to preserve and protect cold water fisheries.Mr. Barnhart is a member of the group's board of directors and coordinator of its activities in the Morgan Run watershed.He has been active in Project Access, an effort to develop a wheelchair-accessible fishing area at the Morgan Run Natural Environment Area. He is also spearheading efforts to convert an old barn at Morgan Run into a nature center.
SPORTS
January 17, 2010
BEST BET Wednesday Charlie Gougeon, state fisheries biologist, presents a status report on the trout population in the Gunpowder River at a meeting of the Maryland Chapter of Trout Unlimited, 7:30 p.m., Odd Fellows Hall, 511 York Road (next door to Set's Sport Shop). Details: 410-303-3829. ARCHERY Sundays through March Winter 3-D shoot, sponsored by Anne Arundel Archers, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Twenty targets set in the woods. Open to the public. Club is in Crofton on the southbound side of Route 3, across from McDonald's.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 4, 2007
Scorchy Tawes wasn't much of a hard-hitting journalist. Thank God. Western Shore people didn't get to see his work on WBOC-TV unless they crossed the Chesapeake Bay, and that's a pity. Tawes, who started out broadcasting outdoors reports, expanded his role with the blessing of station managers, who knew a good thing when they saw it. He liked to say he covered the Eastern Shore from "Kiptopeake to Kent County, Bridgeville to Blackwater." For 21 years he did a show called Scorchy's Corner, where he let regular people tell their stories - more than 2,000 all told - in their own words at their own speed.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 27, 2006
My first brook trout arrived on a frosty late-spring morning in mountain water so cold it made my fingers tingle before going completely numb. No bigger than my hand, the brookie was a work of art to rival New Hampshire's Chocorua Lake, its home just before I enticed it to swallow my fly and to which I would return it moments later. Its olive skin peppered with blue-ringed red dots and a rakish orange belly is a vivid image that has stayed with me for more than 25 years. If I had a lick of artistic ability, I could draw that fish from memory.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
The earthy growl of the big tank truck that creeps along back roads beckons Maryland's 56,000 trout fishermen the way the cheery jingle of an ice cream truck calls to kids. Sloshing around in the tank's cold recesses are springtime treats: dark, glistening brown trout; silver, speckled rainbows; and a sunflower-yellow variety that makes the surrounding water glitter. In an annual ritual that precedes the opening of trout season March 25, hundreds of thousands of plump, wiggling fish raised in hatcheries are being trucked to streams and lakes around the state and turned loose.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 11, 2005
THE ALLEGED enticement of "free" lectures always reminds me of the opening of Annie Hall, in which Woody Allen starts with a joke: "Two elderly women are at a Catskill mountain resort and one of 'em says: `Boy, the food in this place is really terrible.' The other one says: `Yeah, I know. And such small portions.' " Free, of course, is only as good as the quality of what's being offered. In the case of the Maryland Chapter of Trout Unlimited's Tuesday meeting, the free offer involves priceless tips from Lefty Kreh, one of the country's premier fly fishing experts and authors.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
Crouched by a bank of the Middle Patuxent River in Columbia, pupils giggled and fidgeted as they held blue plastic cups containing precious creatures. At the count of three, the children lowered their cups into the water, releasing hundreds of pinky-sized trout that they had raised in their classrooms. Wading in shallow water nearby, 11-year-old Briana Lakish bid her fish farewell. "Bye, babies; we'll miss you," Briana said. Since January, groups of fourth- and fifth-graders from three Howard County schools - Forest Ridge in Laurel and Swansfield and Thunder Hill in Columbia - have raised nearly 600 rainbow trout imported from British Columbia as part of the Trout in the Classroom program, organized by Trout Unlimited, a conservation group, and the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | April 9, 1995
I spent some time last Saturday shoreline fishing Liberty Reservoir around Oakland Mills Road, off of Route 26 and later off of Nicodemus Road, near Finksburg.A number of reports of nice largemouth bass hookups at both Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs over the last couple of weeks sparked my interest.This wasn't very serious fishing, but more like a leisure scouting mission, and it paid off when three nice pre-spawn bass grabbed my lures. All three were in shallow, protected water.I took two on spinnerbaits in an area known as Three Fingers Cove, which is near the boat ramp off Liberty Road.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | November 15, 1992
Recent stock assessments of red drum indicate high catch rates and low spawning success, and measures to control both will be the subject of a Maryland Department of Natural Resources public meeting Wednesday night in Berlin.The meeting, which will begin at 7 p.m. at Stephen Decatur High School, also will deal with the status of the black drum.It is unclear whether black drum are being overfished.Copies of the draft management plan for black and red drum may be reviewed at Chesapeake Bay Program repository libraries.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 6, 2003
There should be a reserved table in anglers' hell for poachers. You know the type - never takes the legal five trout when 50 are available and then boasts about it. The state has a toll-free number for good citizens to turn in rotten ones. It advertises the number in both editions of the fishing guide. Trout Unlimited chapters give away business cards with the number. Pretty good so far. But lots of anglers, from Conowingo Dam to Point Lookout, tell me that not only do there seem to be more poachers each year, they're also growing bolder.
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